Preparedness Notes for Tuesday — November 26, 2019

November 26th is the birthday of both gun inventor Eugene Reising (born 1884, died February 21, 1967) and the late Barton Biggs (born 1932, died July 14, 2012). Biggs was a money manager known for his pro-preparedness stance. Reising was best known as the designer of the Reising submachinegun. (Pictured.)

I just got word that Palmetto State Armory (one of our affiliate advertisers) has started their week-long Black Friday sale.  They have their 16″ Mid-Length 5.56 NATO 1:7 Nitride Classic Upper with Bolt Carrier Group & Charging Handle in Flat Dark Earth (FDE) on sale for just $219.99. To find this, type “5165457990” in their search box, to find this item. Meanwhile they have match complete lowers on sale for $129.99. Just type “7779346” in their search box, to find this item. If you slap that upper on that lower then–aside for a magazine and a rear sight (or optic)–you’ll have a complete M4gery for less than $350!  That is a great deal. If you can afford to, then I recommend that you buy several sets.

They also have their Nitride MPI Full-Auto AR-15 Bolt Carrier Groups on sale at just $49.99!  Paste item number 516446953 into their search box. If you own two or more ARs, then you should keep at least one  complete spare Bolt Carrier Group on hand!

And if you have an AR  lower already on hand, then don’t miss their Midlength 5.56 NATO 1:7 A2 Nitride Freedom Rifle Build Kits, at $289.99.  Just type “507279” in their search box, to find this build parts kit.

Order soon, since quantities are limited, and they are not taking back orders at the Black Friday prices.

SurvivalBlog Writing Contest

Today we present another entry for Round 85 of the SurvivalBlog non-fiction writing contest. The more than $12,000 worth of prizes for this round include:

First Prize:

  1. A $3,000 gift certificate towards a Sol-Ark Solar Generator from Veteran owned Portable Solar LLC. The only EMP Hardened Solar Generator System available to the public.
  2. A Gunsite Academy Three Day Course Certificate. This can be used for any one, two, or three day course (a $1,095 value),
  3. A course certificate from onPoint Tactical for the prize winner’s choice of three-day civilian courses, excluding those restricted for military or government teams. Three day onPoint courses normally cost $795,
  4. DRD Tactical is providing a 5.56 NATO QD Billet upper. These have hammer forged, chrome-lined barrels and a hard case, to go with your own AR lower. It will allow any standard AR-type rifle to have a quick change barrel. This can be assembled in less than one minute without the use of any tools. It also provides a compact carry capability in a hard case or in 3-day pack (an $1,100 value),
  5. Two cases of Mountain House freeze-dried assorted entrees in #10 cans, courtesy of Ready Made Resources (a $350 value),
  6. A $250 gift certificate good for any product from Sunflower Ammo,
  7. American Gunsmithing Institute (AGI) is providing a $300 certificate good towards any of their DVD training courses.

Second Prize:

  1. A gift certificate from Quantum Harvest LLC (up to a $2,200 value) good for 12% off the purchase of any of their sun-tracking models, and 10% off the purchase price of any of their other models.
  2. A Front Sight Lifetime Diamond Membership, providing lifetime free training at any Front Sight Nevada course, with no limit on repeating classes. This prize is courtesy of a SurvivalBlog reader who prefers to be anonymous.
  3. A Glock form factor SIRT laser training pistol and a SIRT AR-15/M4 Laser Training Bolt, courtesy of Next Level Training, which have a combined retail value of $589,
  4. A $300 purchase credit for any of the products from EMPShield.com
  5. A Three-Day Deluxe Emergency Kit from Emergency Essentials (a $190 value),
  6. Two 1,000-foot spools of full mil-spec U.S.-made 750 paracord (in-stock colors only) from www.TOUGHGRID.com (a $240 value).
  7. An assortment of products along with a one hour consultation on health and wellness from Pruitt’s Tree Resin (a $265 value).

Third Prize:

  1. Good2GoCo.com is providing a $400 purchase credit at regular prices for the prize winner’s choice of either Wise Foods or Augason long term storage foods, in stackable buckets.
  2. Three sets each of made-in-USA regular and wide-mouth reusable canning lids. (This is a total of 300 lids and 600 gaskets.) This prize is courtesy of Harvest Guard (a $270 value)
  3. A Royal Berkey water filter, courtesy of Directive 21 (a $275 value),
  4. Expanded sets of both washable feminine pads and liners, donated by Naturally Cozy (a $185 retail value),
  5. Two Super Survival Pack seed collections, a $150 value, courtesy of Seed for Security, LLC,
  6. Mayflower Trading is donating a $200 gift certificate for homesteading appliances.

Round 85 ends on November 30th, so get busy writing and e-mail us your entry. Remember that there is a 1,500-word minimum, and that articles on practical “how to” skills for survival have an advantage in the judging.



Our Prepping Journey – Part 1, by Elli O.

This article describes how we began our self-reliance path, and where we are now.

Our Background

I am a retired career public safety employee with a secondary career of teaching disaster preparedness. My husband is in sales and has a past career in carpentry. We are both in our 60s and have four grown children. We were raised and still reside in Ohio.

The Move to the Farm

When our children were still pre-adolescent we moved from a small city (50,000) to our present location. There was something within us that preferred a country setting even though we weren’t exactly living in downtown Los Angeles. So we purchased a home with just over 10 acres with an average sized house and lots of space outdoors.

Our land is mainly meadow/pasture with some wooded areas. It was because of this “pasture land” that caused us to consider (and eventually purchase) livestock. The land is beautiful but the soil composition is far from acceptable, mainly clay and shale. This makes gardening a challenge, but not an impossibility!

Location

As I stated earlier we live in rural Ohio, only 40 miles from a large metropolis. On different occasions I have perused SurvivalRealty.com with thoughts of relocating to the American Redoubt. But then I realized that what I needed was not a change of scenery, it was a change of attitude!

Our “true neighbors” are friendly but non-intrusive, gardeners and gun owners. But our closest neighbors are actually in a home on our property. Several years after we moved to our farm, we invited my parents to build on a corner of our land. This was extremely beneficial for all involved. As my parents aged and needed assistance, we were only 100 steps away. And our children received the blessing of growing up with grandparent involvement.

This residence is now rented by a friend who is like minded in the area of preparedness/self-sufficiency. This is more of a blessing than you can imagine. His area of expertise is security (more on this later) where as mine is food and medical. He is a wonderful addition to our farm.

Lessons learned from our property
  1. It’s easier to keep the land cleared than to play catch-up.
  2. Start small.

I would describe myself as a modern day house wife of the 1950’s. I have not ventured far from the way in which I was raised. I enjoy cooking from scratch, sewing and repairing clothing, cleaning house, gardening, and preserving food.

My handyman husband is in sales but has a background as a carpenter. He can build or fix anything if it’s made of wood. He also handles electrical and mechanical with ease and competency.

Our Lifestyle

We consider ourselves blessed beyond measure but in reality we are your basic middle class family trying to live within our means. Our lifestyle is thought to be miserly by some but we are frugal due to our “low debt tolerance”. We have learned throughout the years that “new” is not always better, and that “best” isn’t always needed. The last brand new vehicle we purchased was in 1986! But you would be wrong to think we are scrooges or that every dime we earn goes toward prepping. We take vacations, have family gatherings, live comfortably, and have been happily married for almost 35 years.

Lessons learned from our family/marriage:
  1. Be on the same page- whether it is parenting, financially, spiritually, and goals.
  2. If you are not on the same page with your spouse/significant other, actively work towards it.

 

Our Prepping Awakening

We have always had extra food in the pantry and the freezer as well as being prepared for just about any emergency whether at home or away. But our journey into “hardcore” prepping began when I met a man through my second career as a disaster preparedness educator. He would ask me “what if…” questions and we would discuss different disaster scenarios. Then he mentioned the novel by William Forstchen, One Second After. I devoured the book.

It was as if my eyes were opened to the friviolousness of my previous prepping. I felt like a preschooler talking science with a professor from MIT. Looking back, we had unknowingly done what the professionals call a hazard risk analysis- we had prepped for the most likely of disasters, those being tornadoes and power outages. We were on the right path for disaster preparedness, just shortsighted in our planning. We needed to consider and plan for the possibility of long term grid down. Things were going to change.

Gardening

I began with gardening. Remember how I said the soil was not suitable for growing vegetables? The past land owner had a spot where dirt had been brought in for a garden. I began growing vegetables. Some years I did well; some years the weeds won out. I realized that because of the location of the garden (it was over the hill and out of sight from the backyard) that I would often forget about it until the weeds were taller than the plants and the vegetables were nowhere to be found.

This problem was corrected by building some raised beds right outside of the back porch. Every year I add to their number and to the variety of vegetables I grow. The raised beds also seem less overwhelming when it comes to weeding. An author I read while researching raised beds suggested that you consider building your raised beds in the fall because you may be too busy in the spring. I found this to be true for us.

As the years passed, I began composting, building my own barrel composters from 55 gallon food grade drums. I still use the composting drums but sometimes I just throw the food scraps directly on the garden during the off season.

Several years ago I decided to buy a small (6×8’) greenhouse kit. My husband and daughter braved a cold April day to assemble it for me. Much to my embarrassment I haven’t used it to its full potential. It is more of a place of storage rather than a place of growth. I am trying to correct that this fall!

Lessons learned from our garden:
  1. Build raised beds in the fall when you will have more time.
  2. Start small. Increase gradually. Yes, I realize that I said this in regards to our lifestyle, but it fits here also.
  3. Grow what you will eat.

 

Preserving the Food

The next logical step was to begin preserving food- either by canning (both water bath and pressure canning), dehydrating, vacuum sealing for the freezer(s), and/or buying in bulk.

I set up some shelves in the basement laundry area which became my extended pantry. I purchased how-to books on preserving food and equipment for the process. Most of the equipment was used- purchased from Craigslist or at auctions. When a friend heard I was learning how to dehydrate food and using a small plastic dehydrator, he gave me an extra Excalibur dehydrator that has a temperature gauge and lots of room. What a gift!

When I have extra cash I make a trip to purchase foods in bulk, generally at a nearby bulk food store. The foods I get here are things like flour, sugar (brown, white, and powdered), and pancake mixes. I had read that most people cannot grow enough wheat to provide the amount of flour their family will need. For this reason I buy flour in 50# bags. Before sealing the flour in food saver bags, I store the flour in the freezer for at least a week to kill any bugs that may be lurking. I was given an electric grain grinder and I purchased #10 cans of wheat berries for long term prepping. These have a 30 year shelf life.

Another valuable source for bulk, long-term storage foods is the LDS (Latter Day Saints) Bishop Storehouses that are located throughout the United States. You don’t have to belong to their church to purchase from their storehouses. Most of their items come in #10 cans and have a 25-30 year shelf life. And they are reasonably priced. Check them out here: www.providentliving.churchofjesuschrist.org/food-storage/home-storage-center-locations

I also watch for sales on seasonal foods- but this may entail other purchases. For example this year when Idaho cherries were on sale, I purchased lots and then had to purchase a cherry pitter!

Some of the more helpful books are listed below. (And no, I don’t get compensation for mentioning them, but SurvivalBlog should earn a sales commission):

  1. Preserving By the Pint – Marisa McClellan
  2. Store This Not That – Crystal Godfrey and Debbie Kent
  3. Ball Complete Book of Home Preserving
Livestock on our Farm

Beef Cattle

About the time I started gardening we thought about making good use of the back field by turning it into pasture for potential livestock. Three sides were already fenced in so our initial costs were relatively low. I have a close friend who raises beef cattle and we held many discussions about raising our own beef. Soon we had purchased two jersey bull calves, each a week old. They cost us $75 each but that was in 2006. (I have seen the cost fluctuate between $75 and $650 per calf.)

Our initial supply purchases included milk replacer, bottles, penicillin (just in case), castration equipment, and dehorning paste. The greatest asset was our friend/mentor who saved the life of more than one calf just by a phone call! He also allowed us use of his calf hutches, stock trailer and truck when we were first starting out. Since then we have made our own hutches from leaking IBP plastic water containers. We also found a great deal on a farm truck (a beater with a heater) and a gently used small stock trailer. But these larger purchases were made eight years or so after our original calf purchases.

Chickens as “Layers”

I have read that most people start with small livestock such as chickens but my husband had bad memories of stinky chicken coops and gory processing from his childhood, so he was against getting chickens. But as I proved myself a worthy keeper of cattle, he finally relented and allowed me to raise chickens for eggs. We were careful with the placement of the coop (for the smell) as well as ease of egg collection. On the first day I brought the hens home, I was thrilled to actually get eggs! To this day, I still get a feeling of satisfaction eating fresh eggs from my “ladies”.

We also have four Pekin ducks that seemed like a good idea at the time we purchased them. Because we don’t have any body of water on our property a bathtub was placed in their pen. During the spring, summer, and fall they provide us with 2-3 eggs a day. These eggs I trade with a friend for his honey.

Sheep

Because we only have 2-4 beef cows at a time, the pasture wasn’t getting eaten down like it should. So when a neighbor with Suffock sheep was moving away and looking for a buyer of their five ewes, we stepped up and bought them. They have done an excellent job eating not only grass but also poison ivy, bittersweet, and grape vines.

Just recently we decided to change breeds of sheep. Instead of Suffock which have wool that need to be sheared every year, we purchased Katahdin ewes that have hair and shed every spring. Both came bred so we will increase our Katahdin flock and hopefully sell off our Suffock flock next spring.

Meat Chickens

I also started a few years ago raising meat chickens. This decision was made when a friend offered to teach me how to process them. I started small- with only 6 chicks and I lost 3 of them before their time. But not to be deterred, I bought another 10 and was able to process them 8 weeks later. Now I raise 20 meat chickens twice a year and am pleased knowing where and how my meat was raised. And yes, I process my own chickens.

Bees

Because of my sweet tooth, I thought it would be a good idea to raise bees. My success has been limited but I am going to try at least another year… I was told early on that there is a steep learning curve when raising bees. I guess I just didn’t understand this comment. What this translates to is this: Keeping bees is expensive to begin and there is no guarantee that you will be successful. I attended day-long bee school, read “Bee Keeping for Dummies” by Howland Blackiston, and attended a weekly training session during the past two summers. But I haven’t harvested any honey. This is very frustrating due to the time, effort, and money that I have invested in this adventure. But because of this investment, I will try another year.

Meat Rabbits

My last addition to the farm were meat rabbits. I purchased a pregnant New Zealand doe. Within 3 weeks she delivered 4 healthy babies. Only 3 months into this adventure, I now have several pregnant does, a buck, and 4 growing babies that will be processed in another few weeks. I plan on processing these here on our farm.

No Dairy Animals

The one area in which we have a great void is the dairy livestock. Because we are not able to commit to milking even once daily, we have chosen to not have either dairy cows or goats. To address this void, we have purchased powdered milk from the grocery store and long term powdered milk from the LDS Storehouse. Although this will only last so long, hopefully it will keep us going until we can barter for a dairy animal should things take a turn for the worse.

Family Dogs

And no farm would be complete without the family dogs. They sleep inside but enjoy being outside when the weather permits. Besides their loyal companionship, they do an excellent job alerting us to visitors and shooing the stray livestock back into the pasture.

(To be concluded tomorrow, in Part 2.)



SurvivalBlog’s News From The American Redoubt

This weekly column features news stories and event announcements from around the American Redoubt region. (Idaho, Montana, eastern Oregon, eastern Washington, and Wyoming.) Much of the region is also more commonly known as The Inland Northwest. We also mention companies of interest to preppers and survivalists that are located in the American Redoubt region. Today, we focus on the listing for sale of Lolo Sporting Goods. (See the Idaho section.)

Region-Wide

The liberal BuzzFeed managed to get most the facts straight in this piece about the Redoubt: The Fight to Bear Arms.

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Supersonic Jets Could Return To Inland Northwest Skies

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H.R.1321 – The Northern Rockies Ecosystem Protection Act may die in committee. This is a bad piece of legislation introduced back in February, by a New York Democrat.  The bill would create umpteen new wilderness areas, block existing roads, and make these areas vulnerably to wildfires. Please contact your congresscritter, and ask them to oppose this over-reaching and land-grabbing legislation. It has 41 co-sponsors. One of them, Elijah Cummings, recently died. So should this legislation.

Idaho

I just heard that a gun store with some interesting history is for sale, in Lewiston, Idaho. Any shooter who lives in north central Idaho is probably familiar with Lolo Sporting Goods. This shop was a regular haunt of gun writers Elmer Keith and Jack O’Connor, back in the day. With its plank floors and pressed tin ceiling, it has an old-fashioned feel. Presently, in addition to its walk-in clientele, it also has an online presence, mainly selling through GunBroker.com. Now that America is fully in the depth of The Trump Slump, I believe that it is a good time to buy any gun-related business. I inquired, and the $319,000 asking price for Lolo sporting Goods does not include the building, but it does include all of their very extensive inventory. Serious inquiries only can be directed to: (208) 743-1031.

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Boise PD snags huge haul of home surveillance products bought with fraudulent credit cards

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Over 100 eagles spotted in Coeur d’Alene as migration season continues

Continue reading“SurvivalBlog’s News From The American Redoubt”





Preparedness Notes for Monday — November 25, 2019

November 25th was the birthday of economist and comedian Ben Stein. His unscripted monologue on economics from Ferris Bueller’s Day Off is one of the most memorable scenes in American cinema. By the way, Stein spends part of each year at his second home in Sandpoint, Idaho, so he is an honorary Redoubter. I’ve heard that he plans to retire here.

Today, another review by our own Pat Cascio.

 



Buck Knives 841 Sprint Pro Folder, by Pat Cascio

Buck Knives is one of America’s oldest knife companies, and with good reason. Buck senses the pulse of the knife buying public, and they have produced some of the most rock-solid knife designs over the years, that are still in production. A knife executive of a major knife company once told me that, a “good” knife design has a three year shelf-life. That means that after about three years, that design no longer holds an interest to the knife buying public. But take a look at many of the Buck designs – like their classic Model 110 that have been around for decades, yet they are solid sellers. I couldn’t tell you how many times I’ve heard someone say, when they saw a large folding knife, with laminated wood handles and brass bolsters on it, and it was called a “Buck Knife”. This is just like facial tissues are usually called “Kleenex”. It has become a generic term, and in reality, it is kudos to the original maker of that product, that it is so readily recognized.

Buck Knives lives on, in Idaho. They finally packed-up and had enough of Kalifornia, and moved to a more free state – and they don’t come much more free than Idaho is. I’ve entertained the thought numerous times about just packing-up and moving to Idaho, from Oregon. The Oregon I live in now, is nothing like the Oregon I knew, when I first moved here in 1979. Oregon is on the fringe of becoming the very next Kalifornia – a state that is pretty much Communistic. Perhaps if I were much younger, I’d just pack-up and move – but such is not the case…my next move will be, into a nice used 5th wheel trailer, and I’ll sell my small homestead. I don’t need the space and acreage we have now – its hard to keep up with the chores. Not quite sure where the wife and I will place our 5th wheel, but whatever doesn’t fit inside of it, will be sold at a garage sale. More than likely, we’ll remain in Oregon – some place – not about to let the liberals run us out of our chosen home state with their idiotic politics.

In recent years Buck Knives has really turned-up the heat on turning out new knife designs. As anyone who has owned a Buck Knife knows, they always come scary sharp out of the box, and hold that edge a good long time. However, when time came to re-sharpen your Buck, it was a real pain to do so, because of the edge geometry and the high Rockwell hardness of the blade. It took a master or someone with a Master’s Degree in knife sharpening to get that job done. Not too many years ago, Buck made a few changes in their process, and their knives — while still holding a good sharp edge, for a good long time — can now be more easily re-sharpened. Way to go, Buck!Continue reading“Buck Knives 841 Sprint Pro Folder, by Pat Cascio”



Recipe of the Week: Terry’s Pumpkin Pie

Reader Terry kindly sent us this recipe of home-made pumpkin pie.

Ingredients
  • A 9-inch diameter (or larger) pumpkin
  • Enough pastry dough for a single-crust pie (9 inch diameter)
  • 2 large eggs
  • 3/4 cup brown sugar, packed
  • 1 teaspoon ground cinnamon
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 1/4 teaspoon ground cloves
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground ginger
  • 1 cup milk
  • Whipped cream (optional)
Directions
  1. Thorough wash exterior of pumpkin, and rinse.
  2. Cut the pumpkin in half lengthwise. Scoop out and discard the seeds and “strings”.
  3. Place in a large microwave-safe dish with the cut side facing down.
  4. Add water, 1 inch deep.
  5. Cover and cook in a microwave oven on high power for 15-18 minutes, until very tender.
  6. While this is cooking, meanwhile roll out pastry to fit a 9-inch pie dish.
  7. Lay the pastry in a pie dish. Trim pastry to 1/2 in. beyond edge of plate. Flute the edges, and then set it  aside.
  8. Drain the pumpkin. When it is cool enough to handle, scoop out the pumpkin pulp and mash it. Measure 1-3/4 cups for the pie mix, and set it aside. (Save any remaining pumpkin for other uses.)
  9. Preheat oven to 425° F.
  10. In large bowl, combine the mashed pumpkin, eggs, brown sugar, cinnamon, salt, cloves and ginger. Beat this mixture until smooth. Gradually beat in the milk. Pour mixture into crust.
  11. Bake at 425° F for 15 minutes. Reduce heat to 350° F; bake 40-to-50 minutes longer, until a knife inserted in the center comes out clean. Cover pie shell edges with aluminum foil during the last 40-to-50 minutes to prevent over-browning.

SERVING

Cool pie on a wire rack. Optionally, top with whipped cream. Can be served warm or chilled.

STORAGE

Refrigerated leftover pie will store for up to three days, if covered.

Do you have a favorite recipe that would be of interest to SurvivalBlog readers? In this weekly recipe column we place emphasis on recipes that use long term storage foods, recipes for wild game, dutch oven and slow cooker recipes, and any that use home garden produce. If you have any favorite recipes, then please send them via e-mail. Thanks!



Economics & Investing For Preppers

Here are the latest news items and commentary on current economics news, market trends, stocks, investing opportunities, and the precious metals markets. We also cover hedges, derivatives, and obscura. Most of these items are from the “tangibles heavy” contrarian perspective of SurvivalBlog’s Founder and Senior Editor, JWR. Today, we look at The Federal Reserve’s current repo market intervention. (See the Economy & Finance  section.)

Economy & Finance:

The Federal Reserve’s new repo market intervention–the so-called “Not QE”–now has them consistently  buying $60 billion in Treasury bills every month. This is essentially a desperation move to prevent short term interest rates from rising. But inevitably this is like trying to stop a rising tide. It is a futile effort. The rising rates are symptomatic of a much larger problem: Sovereign debt that is so enormous that it can never be re-paid. The Fed’s “Not QE” shenanigans cannot go on forever. At some point interest rates will rise, and there will be either be sovereign debt defaults (unlikely) or there will be mass inflation. Be prepared or the latter, folks. It is wise to diversify into compact liquid tangibles. Think: Silver. Gold. Guns. Lots of guns. Old guns. New guns. Guns without paperwork.

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New Google Checking Accounts Threaten to Shake Up Banking Industry

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Farm bankruptcies increase nationwide, report says

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At Wolf Street: Negative Interest Rates Bite: Bundesbank Warns of Risks to Financial Stability, Moody’s Downgrades Outlook for German Banks

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Japan considers issuing 50-year bonds to support yields

Continue reading“Economics & Investing For Preppers”



The Editors’ Quote of the Day:

“The wealth of another region excites their greed; and if it is weak, their lust for power as well. Nothing from the rising to the setting of the sun is enough for them. Among all others only they are compelled to attack the poor as well as the rich. Plunder, rape, and murder they falsely call empire; and where they make a desert, they call it peace.” – Tacitus



Preparedness Notes for Sunday — November 24, 2019

November 24th marks the day that John Knox died, in 1572. (He was born in 1514.) AtheistAgendaPedia says: “Born near Haddington Scotland. He was influenced by George Wishart, who was burned for heresy in 1546, and the following year Knox became the spokesman for the Reformation in Scotland. After imprisonment and exile in England and the European continent, in 1559 he returned to Scotland, where he supervised the preparation of the constitution and liturgy of the Reformed Church.”

SurvivalBlog Writing Contest

Today we present another entry for Round 85 of the SurvivalBlog non-fiction writing contest. The more than $12,000 worth of prizes for this round include:

First Prize:

  1. A $3,000 gift certificate towards a Sol-Ark Solar Generator from Veteran owned Portable Solar LLC. The only EMP Hardened Solar Generator System available to the public.
  2. A Gunsite Academy Three Day Course Certificate. This can be used for any one, two, or three day course (a $1,095 value),
  3. A course certificate from onPoint Tactical for the prize winner’s choice of three-day civilian courses, excluding those restricted for military or government teams. Three day onPoint courses normally cost $795,
  4. DRD Tactical is providing a 5.56 NATO QD Billet upper. These have hammer forged, chrome-lined barrels and a hard case, to go with your own AR lower. It will allow any standard AR-type rifle to have a quick change barrel. This can be assembled in less than one minute without the use of any tools. It also provides a compact carry capability in a hard case or in 3-day pack (an $1,100 value),
  5. Two cases of Mountain House freeze-dried assorted entrees in #10 cans, courtesy of Ready Made Resources (a $350 value),
  6. A $250 gift certificate good for any product from Sunflower Ammo,
  7. American Gunsmithing Institute (AGI) is providing a $300 certificate good towards any of their DVD training courses.

Second Prize:

  1. A gift certificate from Quantum Harvest LLC (up to a $2,200 value) good for 12% off the purchase of any of their sun-tracking models, and 10% off the purchase price of any of their other models.
  2. A Front Sight Lifetime Diamond Membership, providing lifetime free training at any Front Sight Nevada course, with no limit on repeating classes. This prize is courtesy of a SurvivalBlog reader who prefers to be anonymous.
  3. A Glock form factor SIRT laser training pistol and a SIRT AR-15/M4 Laser Training Bolt, courtesy of Next Level Training, which have a combined retail value of $589,
  4. A $300 purchase credit for any of the products from EMPShield.com
  5. A Three-Day Deluxe Emergency Kit from Emergency Essentials (a $190 value),
  6. Two 1,000-foot spools of full mil-spec U.S.-made 750 paracord (in-stock colors only) from www.TOUGHGRID.com (a $240 value).
  7. An assortment of products along with a one hour consultation on health and wellness from Pruitt’s Tree Resin (a $265 value).

Third Prize:

  1. Good2GoCo.com is providing a $400 purchase credit at regular prices for the prize winner’s choice of either Wise Foods or Augason long term storage foods, in stackable buckets.
  2. Three sets each of made-in-USA regular and wide-mouth reusable canning lids. (This is a total of 300 lids and 600 gaskets.) This prize is courtesy of Harvest Guard (a $270 value)
  3. A Royal Berkey water filter, courtesy of Directive 21 (a $275 value),
  4. Expanded sets of both washable feminine pads and liners, donated by Naturally Cozy (a $185 retail value),
  5. Two Super Survival Pack seed collections, a $150 value, courtesy of Seed for Security, LLC,
  6. Mayflower Trading is donating a $200 gift certificate for homesteading appliances.

Round 85 ends on November 30th, so get busy writing and e-mail us your entry. Remember that there is a 1,500-word minimum, and that articles on practical “how to” skills for survival have an advantage in the judging.



Prepper Lessons from Noah’s Ark, by C.H.

Before I begin this article, I should clarify that I believe that Noah’s flood is a historical fact, not an allegorical myth. It actually happened; a flood that covered the whole earth and destroyed all humanity and all animals on the earth, with the exception of one man, his family, and those animals with him. As I see it, if one can’t believe the Bible about the flood, one can’t believe it about the resurrection either. Noah is included in the ‘cloud of witnesses’ in Hebrews 11:7. These witnesses are to encourage us to ‘lay aside every encumberance and the sin which so easily entangles us, etc.’ (Hebrews 12:1). Hardly the place for a fictional character and story. And I also note that Christ Himself spoke of the flood as an actual historical event (Matthew 24:38-39). So if you share with me the belief that flood did indeed happen, then please read on.

I must also note that much of what we ‘know’ as a culture about Noah’s ark comes from children’s books and songs (“The Loooord, told Noah, to build him an arky-arky”). Noah is usually portrayed as an elderly man with white hair and beard (rather chubby) in a bathrobe, happily enjoying a sail with a bunch of happy animals on deck. The story of Noah always seems to find it’s way into children’s Bible books, while stories about Sodom and Gomorrah (Genesis 19) or the Levite’s concubine (Judges 19) are avoided for being too ‘dark’ for a children’s book. This puzzles me. Apart from the fall and the crucifixion, there has not been a darker day in human history than the day the flood began.

This was not a rainstorm, or even a hurricane. The ‘fountains of the great deep burst open, and the floodgates of the sky were opened’ (Genesis 7:11). Enough water was released to cover the tallest mountains on earth. Cataclysm. All of humanity was destroyed. Don’t make the mistake of thinking that just a few people were lost because the earth was so young and people hadn’t multiplied. There were nine generations between Adam and Noah. And if a typical married woman today, living say 75 years, would be pregnant 10-20 times (without birth control), how many children could a woman living 900 years bear? By my reckoning, hundreds of thousands, if not millions, of lives were lost. And Noah did NOT resemble a chubby Santa Claus. Given that he lived 900 years and was 600 years old when the flood came (we don’t what age he began building the ark), in appearance he would resemble a modern day 50 year old the day he entered the ark. And if he built, by hand, a ship the size of the ark, Noah was NOT chubby. Think: chiseled, scarred, and hard as nails.Continue reading“Prepper Lessons from Noah’s Ark, by C.H.”



The Survivalist’s Odds ‘n Sods

SurvivalBlog presents another edition of The Survivalist’s Odds ‘n Sods— a collection of news bits and pieces that are relevant to the modern survivalist and prepper from “JWR”. Our goal is to educate our readers, to help them to recognize emerging threats and to be better prepared for both disasters and negative societal trends. You can’t mitigate a risk if you haven’t first identified a risk. Today, we look at the Global Warming cult.

The Global Warming Cult

Linked over at the great Whatfinger.com news aggregation site there’s this at The American Spectator: Global Warming’s Apocalyptic Path. The article begins:

 “Global warming has been characterized by its critics (and occasionally by followers like Hawaii Sen. Mazie Hirono) as a religious movement. While this is correct, it is a religious movement of a special kind, that is, an apocalyptic movement. And although it is widely known that apocalyptic movements foretell an end of days, demand huge sacrifices by followers, and demonize dissent, what is less known is that these movements follow predictable patterns. The general “laws” that an apocalyptic movement follows over time explain both its short-term strength and, fortunately, its longer-term vulnerability.”

Religious Institutions Now Must Hire Pro-Abortion and LGBT Employees

D.S.V. sent this: New York Requires Religious Schools, Churches, Hospitals To Hire Pro-Abortion, Pro-LGBT Employees.

Man Charged for Removing GPS Tracker on His Car

H.L. sent us this from The Free Thought Project site:  Cops Put GPS Tracker on Man’s Car, Charge Him With Theft for Removing It.

The article’s introduction reads:

“What would you do if you found a creepy device attached to your car that looked like something used to track you? Would you simply leave it there and go on about your business? Or, would you remove it? Well, a man in Indiana chose the latter and removed it. It turned out to be a GPS tracker and because it was placed their by police, this man is now being charged with theft. He’s now fought his case all the way to the state Supreme Court.

Since 2012, it has been unlawful for police departments to attach GPS tracking devices to vehicles without first obtaining a warrant, thanks to a ruling by the US Supreme Court. Despite outlawing warrantless applications of GPS trackers, TFTP has reported on several cases in which this still happens. However, this is not one of them. The Warrick County Sheriff’s Office legally obtained a warrant and placed a GPS tracker on Derek Heuring’s car in July of 2018.

The Warrick County Sheriff’s Office suspected Heuring of being drug dealer, so they began tracking his every move. But after a week, Heuring discovered the GPS device and removed it.”Continue reading“The Survivalist’s Odds ‘n Sods”



The Editors’ Quote of the Day:

“The raid on Deutsche Bank in Germany back in September over the money laundering probe of Danske Bank, which is the biggest lender in Denmark, contributed to the sudden collapse in confidence. The governments are desperate for money and they are hunting it on a global scale. Deutsche Bank served as a correspondent bank to Danske’s Estonia branch. That is where the latest money laundering is alleged to have occurred. The banker there in the Estonia branch of Danske, Aivar Rehe, was found dead by police there in Estonia. He had been previously questioned by prosecutors and was considered to be the key witness in the money laundering probe. As always, just like Jeffrey Epstein his death was declared to be a suicide. This is standard whenever they need to cover something up. Boris Berezovsky suddenly commits suicide being very remorseful for making billions I suppose. Anyone who could expose things others do not want always seems to commit suicide.

The crisis in liquidity is that American bankers will not lend to Europe. Because of the European Banking Crisis, banks just do not trust banks. Nobody knows who will be standing after a failure at Deutsche Bank. The Fed has had to step in to be the neutral lender not because of a crisis in the USA, but because of the collapse in confidence in Europe’s banking system as a whole. Stay alert – this is just getting started.”  – Martin W. Armstrong



Preparedness Notes for Saturday — November 23, 2019

On November 23rd, 1980, a 7.2-magnitude quake struck southern Italy killing more than 3,000 people. The casualty toll was probably so high because the tremor struck during Sunday night mass, as many residents sat in churches that crumbled in the quake. The quake was centered in Eboli, south of Naples. In nearby Balvano, children were preparing to receive their first communion at the 1,000-year-old Conza Della Comapgna church. The church was demolished and killed dozens of people, including 26 children.

SurvivalBlog Writing Contest

Today we present another entry for Round 85 of the SurvivalBlog non-fiction writing contest. The more than $12,000 worth of prizes for this round include:

First Prize:

  1. A $3,000 gift certificate towards a Sol-Ark Solar Generator from Veteran owned Portable Solar LLC. The only EMP Hardened Solar Generator System available to the public.
  2. A Gunsite Academy Three Day Course Certificate. This can be used for any one, two, or three day course (a $1,095 value),
  3. A course certificate from onPoint Tactical for the prize winner’s choice of three-day civilian courses, excluding those restricted for military or government teams. Three day onPoint courses normally cost $795,
  4. DRD Tactical is providing a 5.56 NATO QD Billet upper. These have hammer forged, chrome-lined barrels and a hard case, to go with your own AR lower. It will allow any standard AR-type rifle to have a quick change barrel. This can be assembled in less than one minute without the use of any tools. It also provides a compact carry capability in a hard case or in 3-day pack (an $1,100 value),
  5. Two cases of Mountain House freeze-dried assorted entrees in #10 cans, courtesy of Ready Made Resources (a $350 value),
  6. A $250 gift certificate good for any product from Sunflower Ammo,
  7. American Gunsmithing Institute (AGI) is providing a $300 certificate good towards any of their DVD training courses.

Second Prize:

  1. A gift certificate from Quantum Harvest LLC (up to a $2,200 value) good for 12% off the purchase of any of their sun-tracking models, and 10% off the purchase price of any of their other models.
  2. A Front Sight Lifetime Diamond Membership, providing lifetime free training at any Front Sight Nevada course, with no limit on repeating classes. This prize is courtesy of a SurvivalBlog reader who prefers to be anonymous.
  3. A Glock form factor SIRT laser training pistol and a SIRT AR-15/M4 Laser Training Bolt, courtesy of Next Level Training, which have a combined retail value of $589,
  4. A $300 purchase credit for any of the products from EMPShield.com
  5. A Three-Day Deluxe Emergency Kit from Emergency Essentials (a $190 value),
  6. Two 1,000-foot spools of full mil-spec U.S.-made 750 paracord (in-stock colors only) from www.TOUGHGRID.com (a $240 value).
  7. An assortment of products along with a one hour consultation on health and wellness from Pruitt’s Tree Resin (a $265 value).

Third Prize:

  1. Good2GoCo.com is providing a $400 purchase credit at regular prices for the prize winner’s choice of either Wise Foods or Augason long term storage foods, in stackable buckets.
  2. Three sets each of made-in-USA regular and wide-mouth reusable canning lids. (This is a total of 300 lids and 600 gaskets.) This prize is courtesy of Harvest Guard (a $270 value)
  3. A Royal Berkey water filter, courtesy of Directive 21 (a $275 value),
  4. Expanded sets of both washable feminine pads and liners, donated by Naturally Cozy (a $185 retail value),
  5. Two Super Survival Pack seed collections, a $150 value, courtesy of Seed for Security, LLC,
  6. Mayflower Trading is donating a $200 gift certificate for homesteading appliances.

Round 85 ends on November 30th, so get busy writing and e-mail us your entry. Remember that there is a 1,500-word minimum, and that articles on practical “how to” skills for survival have an advantage in the judging.



Getting Out of Dodge – Part 3, by Doc

(Continued from Part 2.  This concludes the article series.)

Getting back to the construction details:  I welded up a steel frame and built hinges using 1” bolts and pipe and 3/8” steel plate for the roof of the patio on the East end of the building. I used metal roof material supported by 6”x2” heavy tubing and 2” angle and a lot of rebar and a 3/8’ steel plate for the hydraulic cylinder to lift against. I bought a 5” diameter hydraulic cylinder 48” long and welded a trunion to steel plates on both ends. With the cylinder attached to the plate on the roof, I slid it out until it was snug against the concrete patio floor and drilled anchors in the concrete. There is also steel in the floor. I bought a hydraulic pump designed for a garage lift with a reservoir that was smaller than the capacity of the hydraulic cylinder. So I had to drill a hole in the bottom of the reservoir, weld in a fitting, and connect a hose to the other end of the cylinder so it would suck the hydraulic fluid into the cylinder and increase the system capacity. We poured 5,000 psi concrete on the roof. First I built two legs of 2” conduit that hinge down to support the roof and keep it level so the concrete wouldn’t run off. Now I feel safer if I want to sit under it for a while. It is 20 years old and the hydraulic hoses are still good.

The house has two bedrooms, a large library, a large kitchen-living room, a large walk in closet ,several other closets, a wine cellar, a generator room, a laundry room, a storage room, a full bath and a half bath, and a wood burning fireplace. That is most of the detail on the home. It is a very well protected nuclear fallout shelter and an energy efficient place to live. For many years I’ve had a low property tax bill and a phone bill, and I didn’t have to pay storage on the RV when I was out of the country. The shop above it has a 14 x 20, a 9×10, and an entry door on the west end and a half bath. It is well insulated with a 220 volt AC in the wall for emergency use if I have to rebuild something in the summer. The solar heat keeps it above freezing with the heat sink under the floor.Continue reading“Getting Out of Dodge – Part 3, by Doc”