JWR’s Recommendations of the Week:

Here are JWR’s Recommendations of the Week for various media and tools of interest to SurvivalBlog readers. The focus is usually on emergency communications gear, bug out bag gear, books and movies that have any tie-in to disaster preparedness, and links to “how to” self-sufficiency videos. There are also links to sources for both storage food as and food storage containers. You will also note an emphasis on history books and historical movies. This week the focus is on ambulance conversions to campers . (See the Instructional Videos section.)

Books:

Gardening When It Counts: Growing Food in Hard Times

o  o  o

EMS Field Guide, BLS Version

o  o  o

Guns, Germs, and Steel: The Fates of Human Societies

o  o  o

The Complete Guide to Your New Root Cellar: How to Build an Underground Root Cellar and Use It for Natural Storage of Fruits and Vegetables (Back to Basics Building)

Continue reading“JWR’s Recommendations of the Week:”





Preparedness Notes for Tuesday — August 6, 2019

On August 6th, 1945 at 8:16 a.m. (Japanese time), an American B-29 bomber– the Enola Gay– dropped the world’s first war-time atom bomb over the city of Hiroshima. Approximately 80,000 people were killed as a result of the blast, with another 35,000 injured. At least another 60,000 would be dead by the end of the year from the effects of the fallout. History is always written by the victors, so the reasoning and justification for this will be argued for years to come. But one thing is for sure: this action officially ushered in the nuclear age in war and has generated mass fear among civilization ever since, even though the firebombing of Japanese cities caused far more damage and loss of life. An interesting side note is Tsutomu Yamaguchi was 3km from the Hiroshima blast but survived. Along with a few other survivors, he made his way to his hometown, Nagasaki, and was again within 3km of the second blast yet survived this one also.

SurvivalBlog Writing Contest

Today we present another entry for Round 84  of the SurvivalBlog non-fiction writing contest. The more than $12,000 worth of prizes for this round include:

First Prize:

  1. A $3,000 gift certificate towards a Sol-Ark Solar Generator from Veteran owned Portable Solar LLC. The only EMP Hardened Solar Generator System available to the public.
  2. A Gunsite Academy Three Day Course Certificate. This can be used for any one, two, or three day course (a $1,095 value),
  3. A course certificate from onPoint Tactical for the prize winner’s choice of three-day civilian courses, excluding those restricted for military or government teams. Three day onPoint courses normally cost $795,
  4. DRD Tactical is providing a 5.56 NATO QD Billet upper. These have hammer forged, chrome-lined barrels and a hard case, to go with your own AR lower. It will allow any standard AR-type rifle to have a quick change barrel. This can be assembled in less than one minute without the use of any tools. It also provides a compact carry capability in a hard case or in 3-day pack (an $1,100 value),
  5. Two cases of Mountain House freeze-dried assorted entrees in #10 cans, courtesy of Ready Made Resources (a $350 value),
  6. A $250 gift certificate good for any product from Sunflower Ammo,
  7. American Gunsmithing Institute (AGI) is providing a $300 certificate good towards any of their DVD training courses.

Second Prize:

  1. A gift certificate from Quantum Harvest LLC (up to a $2,200 value) good for 12% off the purchase of any of their sun-tracking models, and 10% off the purchase price of any of their other models.
  2. A Front Sight Lifetime Diamond Membership, providing lifetime free training at any Front Sight Nevada course, with no limit on repeating classes. This prize is courtesy of a SurvivalBlog reader who prefers to be anonymous.
  3. A Glock form factor SIRT laser training pistol and a SIRT AR-15/M4 Laser Training Bolt, courtesy of Next Level Training, which have a combined retail value of $589,
  4. A Three-Day Deluxe Emergency Kit from Emergency Essentials (a $190 value),
  5. Two 1,000-foot spools of full mil-spec U.S.-made 750 paracord (in-stock colors only) from www.TOUGHGRID.com (a $240 value).
  6. An assortment of products along with a one hour consultation on health and wellness from Pruitt’s Tree Resin (a $265 value).

Third Prize:

  1. Three sets each of made-in-USA regular and wide-mouth reusable canning lids. (This is a total of 300 lids and 600 gaskets.) This prize is courtesy of Harvest Guard (a $270 value)
  2. A Royal Berkey water filter, courtesy of Directive 21 (a $275 value),
  3. Expanded sets of both washable feminine pads and liners, donated by Naturally Cozy (a $185 retail value),
  4. Two Super Survival Pack seed collections, a $150 value, courtesy of Seed for Security, LLC,
  5. Mayflower Trading is donating a $200 gift certificate for homesteading appliances.

Round 84 ends on September 30th, so get busy writing and e-mail us your entry. Remember that there is a 1,500-word minimum, and that articles on practical “how to” skills for survival have an advantage in the judging.



My Toolbox, by Richard T.

I’m now 71 years old, and I have had a toolbox ever since my dad helped me build my first one when I was about 12. He cut all the parts on a homemade tablesaw that he had built out of an old washing machine motor and plywood. He showed me how to nail the parts together and paint it. It was a simple tray-style toolbox; one side had room for pliers, a hammer, screwdriver and the other side had partitions for hardware. My mother’s diary records that I liked to build things at an early age, I still do.

My folks moved from the farm to town a year before I was born. On the farm my Dad either improvised the tools he needed, paid a visit to the blacksmith shop or waited several weeks for the Sears-Roebuck catalog order to arrive. That didn’t change much in town where he had a workshop in the basement with the table saw and a wall mounted tool cabinet made out of plywood painted gray to make it look like metal. He had places in that cabinet for screwdrivers, saws, pliers, hammers, etc. He organized hardware, little brads and screws, by containing them in jars whose lids were attached to a strip of wood under a shelf and the jar contents would be accessed by twisting the jar off. This was a very common tip in 1950s and 1960s Popular Mechanics magazines.

Because I was a city boy, I bought my tools from a Sears-Roebuck store several miles away, which at that time was where you went to buy tools. And at first the only tools I needed were to work on my vehicles, therefore wrenches was all that I had. My first power tool was a Stanley 3×21 belt sander for $65 that I bought with my paperboy income when I was in high school. For many years one 16” gray metal Craftsman toolbox with a red handled tray served me well. I didn’t begin to acquire a lot of tools until my job as a cabinetmaker required that I have my own tools. Those were left at work but when we bought a house that was in need of massive restoration, I began to acquire a vast number of tools in various categories.Continue reading“My Toolbox, by Richard T.”



SurvivalBlog’s News From The American Redoubt

This weekly column features news stories and event announcements from around the American Redoubt region. (Idaho, Montana, eastern Oregon, eastern Washington, and Wyoming.) Much of the region is also more commonly known as The Inland Northwest. We also mention companies of interest to preppers and survivalists that are located in the American Redoubt region. Today, we focus on a widely-wandering grizzly bear.  (See the Idaho section.)

Region-Wide

Reader Tim J.  sent us this: Some great aerial photography, showing life on the Palouse: Ag Pilot/Crop Duster “Day in the life of”.  He operates primarily in eastern Washington and adjoining Idaho.  As you watch this, take notice: The narrow runway (I’ve seen wider taxiways), a very tight turn-round at the ag chem site (note the small gap between the wing tip and the building), and some precision low-level flying with zero margin for error!

o o o

Radio Free Redoubt: T-REX 2019 Countdown and America Love it or Leave it

Idaho

This retreat home property offered for sale is roughly half way between Sandpoint and Athol: Off-Grid Homestead, Cocolalla, Idaho. JWR’s Comment:  Coincidentally, I stayed at this home as a guest, back around 2003. Even then, it struck me as a quite viable retreat. With the many improvements since then, it is undoubtedly an even better retreat now.

o o o

Wandering grizzly still in upper Lochsa River region

Continue reading“SurvivalBlog’s News From The American Redoubt”



The Survivalist’s Odds ‘n Sods:

SurvivalBlog presents another edition of The Survivalist’s Odds ‘n Sods— a collection of news bits and pieces that are relevant to the modern survivalist and prepper from “JWR”. Our goal is to educate our readers, to help them to recognize emerging threats and to be better prepared for both disasters and negative societal trends. You can’t mitigate a risk if you haven’t first identified a risk. Today, I’m starting off with news about a City-Killer Asteroid.

Approach of ‘City-Killer Asteroid’ was Missed

By way of Whatfinger.com (my favorite news aggregation site): Scientists almost didn’t detect approach of ‘city-killer asteroid’. An excerpt:

“Alan Duffy was confused. On Thursday, the astronomer’s phone was suddenly flooded with calls from reporters wanting to know about a large asteroid that had just whizzed past Earth, and he couldn’t figure out ‘why everyone was so alarmed.’

‘I thought everyone was getting worried about something we knew was coming,’ Duffy, who is also lead scientist at the Royal Institution of Australia, told The Washington Post. Forecasts had already predicted that a couple asteroids would be passing relatively close to Earth this week.

Then he looked up the details of the hunk of space rock named Asteroid 2019 OK.

‘I was stunned,’ he said. ‘This was a true shock.’

This asteroid wasn’t one that scientists had been tracking and it had seemingly appeared from “out of nowhere,” Michael Brown, a Melbourne-based observational astronomer, told The Post. According to data from NASA, the craggy rock was large, roughly 110 yards wide, and moving quickly along a path that brought it within about 45,360 miles of Earth. That’s about one-fifth of the distance to the moon and what Duffy considers ‘uncomfortably close.'”

Land Expropriation Without Compensation

A hat tip to D.S. for sending this from South Africa: Three major criticisms of the government’s land expropriation position.

Continue reading“The Survivalist’s Odds ‘n Sods:”



The Editors’ Quote of the Day:

“A decline in courage may be the most striking feature which an outside observer notices in the West in our days. The Western world has lost its civil courage, both as a whole and separately, in each country, each government, each political party, and of course in the United Nations. Such a decline in courage is particularly noticeable among the ruling groups and the intellectual elite, causing an impression of loss of courage by the entire society. Of course there are many courageous individuals but they have no determining influence on public life […] Should one point out that from ancient times decline in courage has been considered the beginning of the end?” – Aleksander Solzhenitsyn



Preparedness Notes for Monday — August 5, 2019

August 5th is the sad anniversary of the Mann Gulch Fire in Montana that took the lives of 13 firefighters (including 12 smokejumpers and one former smokejumper), in 1949. The intense, fast-moving forest fire took place in what later became the Gates of the Mountains Wilderness. The events of that fire were chronicled in the book Young Men and Fire by Norman Maclean and immortalized in the haunting lyrics of the ballad Cold Missouri Waters by James Keelaghan. (Warning: Grab a box of tissue, before listening.)

Today, we present a product review by our Field Gear Editor, Pat Cascio. But first, we’re announcing the winners of Round 83 of the SurvivalBlog Nonfiction Writing Contest. Round 84 is already underway. If you’d like to win one of these prize packages, then get busy writing!

 



The Latest Writing Contest Winners (Round 83)

After a brief delay due to some gun show travel, we’ve completed the judging for Round 83 of the SurvivalBlog non-fiction writing contest. That round ended on Just 31st, 2019. The winners are:

First Prize Winner:

First Prize goes to Doctor Dan for Family Medical Preps Part 1 & Part 2 (posted July 17 &18, 2019).  He will receive the following prizes:

  1. A $3,000 gift certificate towards a Sol-Ark Solar Generator from Veteran owned Portable Solar LLC. The only EMP Hardened Solar Generator System available to the public.
  2. A Gunsite Academy Three Day Course Certificate. This can be used for any one, two, or three day course (a $1,095 value),
  3. A course certificate from onPoint Tactical for the prize winner’s choice of three-day civilian courses, excluding those restricted for military or government teams. Three day onPoint courses normally cost $795,
  4. DRD Tactical is providing a 5.56 NATO QD Billet upper. These have hammer forged, chrome-lined barrels and a hard case, to go with your own AR lower. It will allow any standard AR-type rifle to have a quick change barrel. This can be assembled in less than one minute without the use of any tools. It also provides a compact carry capability in a hard case or in 3-day pack (an $1,100 value),
  5. Two cases of Mountain House freeze-dried assorted entrees in #10 cans, courtesy of Ready Made Resources (a $350 value),
  6. A $250 gift certificate good for any product from Sunflower Ammo,
  7. American Gunsmithing Institute (AGI) is providing a $300 certificate good towards any of their DVD training courses.

Second Prize Winner:

Second Prize goes to Marica Bernstein for Including Old Books in Your Preps Parts 1-4 (posted July 23-26,  2019).  She will receive the following prizes:

  1. A gift certificate from Quantum Harvest LLC (up to a $2,200 value) good for 12% off the purchase of any of their sun-tracking models, and 10% off the purchase price of any of their other models.
  2. A Front Sight Lifetime Diamond Membership, providing lifetime free training at any Front Sight Nevada course, with no limit on repeating classes. This prize is courtesy of a SurvivalBlog reader who prefers to be anonymous.
  3. A Glock form factor SIRT laser training pistol and a SIRT AR-15/M4 Laser Training Bolt, courtesy of Next Level Training, which have a combined retail value of $589,
  4. A Three-Day Deluxe Emergency Kit from Emergency Essentials (a $190 value),
  5. Two 1,000-foot spools of full mil-spec U.S.-made 750 paracord (in-stock colors only) from www.TOUGHGRID.com (a $240 value).
  6. An assortment of products along with a one hour consultation on health and wellness from Pruitt’s Tree Resin (a $265 value).

Third Prize Winner:

Third Prize goes to SoCal9mm for Our Wildfire Evacuation Parts 1-5, (posted June 11-15 2019).  They will receive the following prizes:

  1. Three sets each of made-in-USA regular and wide-mouth reusable canning lids. (This is a total of 300 lids and 600 gaskets.) This prize is courtesy of Harvest Guard (a $270 value)
  2. A Royal Berkey water filter, courtesy of Directive 21 (a $275 value),
  3. Expanded sets of both washable feminine pads and liners, donated by Naturally Cozy (a $185 retail value),
  4. Two Super Survival Pack seed collections, a $150 value, courtesy of Seed for Security, LLC,
  5. Mayflower Trading is donating a $200 gift certificate for homesteading appliances.

Honorable Mention Prizes

Honorable Mention prizes ($30 Amazon gift cards, funded by JWR) are being awarded for these six articles:

Round 84 ends on September 30th, so get busy writing and e-mail us your entry. Remember that there is a 1,500-word minimum, and that articles on practical “how to” skills for survival have an advantage in the judging.



Lifelite TCP Pepper Ball Launcher, by Pat Cascio

Lethal force, less-lethal force, less-than-lethal force, non-lethal force…it can all be very confusing, and when it comes down to it, a jury will be the ones deciding your fate, in a court room, whenever you use any type of “force” to defend yourself or your loved ones. And, no matter what you might think of the amount of force you use, you could still be wrong. Not too many years ago, a Texas judge ruled that a man who was involved in a fight, used lethal force to kill another man. The “lethal” force used – it was his cowboy boots – you see, he stomped the other man to death. Ordinarily, you wouldn’t consider a pair of cowboy boots as a lethal weapon, or for that matter, a “weapon” at all. So, you see, it all boils down to what a judge and jury say, vis-a-vis the amount of force you might have used.

Some months back, I did an article on Lifelite’s pepper ball “flashlight” – for lack of a better term, and it was very impressive – it even had a laser for aiming it, still it wasn’t quite what some folks were looking for. It is a very popular item in many teacher’s desks – as a last resort to help defend against a school shooter – nice idea and many teachers are storing these “flashlights” locked in their desk drawer.

Now, Lifelite just came out with a pepper ball “gun” – and it does resemble a handgun – though any knowledgeable person would readily realize it isn’t a handgun – or at least they should. The TCP Launcher is quite unique if you ask me, first of all, it fits the hand nicely, and secondly, it has sights so you can aim it. And, it is a semi-auto “handgun” – it will fire 6 pepper balls or practice balls as fast as you can pull the trigger.

The TCP is advertised as a non-lethal solution to many problems–more on this later–but it is a darn good idea for anyone who doesn’t want to own firearms for self-defense. I believe this launcher would be great for home-defense, as well as on the streets. It is a bit big, but it can be carried in a holster than Lifelite sells – and it is a nice holster. Many security officers are not armed these days – some have nothing more than a pair of handcuffs and if they are lucky, a can of pepper spray, and it doesn’t always work, especially in the outdoors where the wind might be blowing – it can, and does get blown back into the face of the user – not a fun thing. Then we have pepper spray, that isn’t a spray, rather it comes out of the can in a stream something akin to Silly String – and it is a better option than the spray, plus it can be had with dye in it, to help ID an attacker who might have run away.Continue reading“Lifelite TCP Pepper Ball Launcher, by Pat Cascio”



Recipe of the Week: Angie’s Beef and White Bean Soup

Angie kindly sent us her recipe for a hearty beef and white bean soup. This makes good use of your stored dry white beans, or canned beans.

Ingredients
  • 2 pounds beef stew meat, trimmed and cut into 1-inch cubed pieces
  • 2 cups chopped onion
  • 2 cups sliced or chopped carrot
  • 4 garlic cloves, minced or grated
  • 2 tablespoons Canola oil, divided
  • 2 cups water
  • 1 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 1 teaspoon black pepper
  • 1 teaspoon dried thyme
  • 1/2 teaspoon dried sage
  • 3 or 4 whole bay leaves
  • 32 ounces beef broth
  • 5 cups of dried white beans, soaked overnight. These should swell to just over 6 cups. Alternatively, you may use three cans (15.8-ounce cans) of Bush brand Cannellini Beans, drained.
Directions
  1. Heat a large Dutch oven over medium-high heat. Add 1 tablespoon canola oil and heat to a ripple.
  2. Add beef to pan and brown on all sides, working in batches if needed. Remove the beef from pan.
  3. Add remaining 1 tablespoon canola oil to pan and heat. Add onion, carrot and garlic. Saute for 5 minutes.
  4. Return beef to the pan. over the sauteed mixture. Stir in the water, bean, salt, black pepper, thyme, sage, bay leaves, and beef broth. Bring to a simmer. Cover and allow to simmer for at least 1-1/2 to 2 hours, until beef is tender.
  5. Remove and discard the bay leaves.
  6. Salt and pepper to taste.
Variations

Other varieties of beans can be substituted.

For extra creaminess: Use a potato masher to crush about half of the beans after the soup has cooked for one hour.

For an electric crock pot, prepare as above, but then transfer to a slow cooker once all ingredients have been added. Slow cook the soup for at least three hours. It may be slow-cooked for 8 to 10 hours on a low setting, if you add an extra cup of water or broth.

STORAGE

Once cooked, this soup stores well refrigerated for up to three days.  After that, feed it to your chickens, or compost it.

Do you have a favorite recipe that would be of interest to SurvivalBlog readers? In this weekly recipe column we place emphasis on recipes that use long term storage foods, recipes for wild game, dutch oven and slow cooker recipes, and any that use home garden produce. If you have any favorite recipes, then please send them via e-mail. Thanks!



Economics & Investing For Preppers

Here are the latest news items and commentary on current economics news, market trends, stocks, investing opportunities, and the precious metals markets. We also cover hedges, derivatives, and obscura. And it bears mention that most of these items are from the “tangibles heavy” contrarian perspective of SurvivalBlog’s Founder and Senior Editor, JWR. Today, we traverse from our normal “E&I” column items to look at tangibly investing in “Pre-Remington” Marlin firearms.

Tangibles Focus: Pre-Remington Marlins

My friend Commander Zero, the editor of the Notes From The Bunker preparedness blog has several times mentioned the significance of “Pre-Remington” Marlin firearms. This term refers to Marlins that were produced before Remington acquired the company in December of 2007, whereupon reportedly the quality control of their rifles began to suffer.

In 2011, Marlin closed its North Haven factory, ending 141 years of manufacturing In Connecticut. That was the end of an era, in the eyes of most American gun collectors. There were many “transitional” Marlins made between 2008 and 2011, but those will never have the resale value of true pre-Remington Marlin rifles.

Although the quality issues have now largely been remedied, there is still a stigma attached to any post-2007 Marlin rifle. From a practical prepping standpoint, the contemporary Marlins–now often made with composite or synthetic stocks and weather-resistant finishes–are quite serviceable guns. But it is the pre-Remington Marlin rifles that are considered most desirable, by collectors.

The newer Marlins, sometimes derisively called “Remlins”, are scoffed at, by many serious gun collectors.  To them, a “proper” Marlin Firearms rifle must:

A.) Have been produced by the original Marlin company, in North Haven, Connecticut.

B.) Have no Remington markings.

C.) Have a “JM” acceptance stamp on the barrel, just forward of the receiver.

D.) Have no cross-bolt safety. (Added to all of their lever-action rifles, in 1984.)

E.) Be unaltered, from the way that it came from the factory. (No sling swivels or recoil pad added.)

And, of course just like any other collectible modern firearm, the accompanying original factory box is a huge plus, when appraising value.

Marlin has a fairly detailed company web site that shows their various models.

I recommend that you keep your eyes peeled when visiting guns shows, gun shops, and pawn shops, to find “correct” collectible pre-Remington Marlins.

Provisos:

SurvivalBlog and its Editors are not paid investment counselors or advisers. Please see our Provisos page for our detailed disclaimers.

News Tips:

Please send your economics and investing news tips to JWR. (Either via e-mail of via our Contact form.) These are often especially relevant, because they come from folks who closely watch specific markets. If you spot any news that would be of interest to SurvivalBlog readers, then please send it in. News from local news outlets that is missed by the news wire services is especially appreciated. And it need not be just about commodities and precious metals. Thanks!





Preparedness Notes for Sunday — August 4, 2019

On August 4th, 1944, 15 year old Jewish diarist Anne Frank and her family were captured by the Nazi Gestapo. The Franks had taken shelter is a small space in a sealed off area of an Amsterdam warehouse along with another Jewish family and a single Jewish man. They were aided by Christian friends who brought them food and supplies. Her diary survived the war, overlooked by the Gestapo, but Anne and nearly all of the others perished in the Nazi death camps.

SurvivalBlog Writing Contest

Today we present another entry for Round 84  of the SurvivalBlog non-fiction writing contest. The more than $12,000 worth of prizes for this round include:

First Prize:

  1. A $3,000 gift certificate towards a Sol-Ark Solar Generator from Veteran owned Portable Solar LLC. The only EMP Hardened Solar Generator System available to the public.
  2. A Gunsite Academy Three Day Course Certificate. This can be used for any one, two, or three day course (a $1,095 value),
  3. A course certificate from onPoint Tactical for the prize winner’s choice of three-day civilian courses, excluding those restricted for military or government teams. Three day onPoint courses normally cost $795,
  4. DRD Tactical is providing a 5.56 NATO QD Billet upper. These have hammer forged, chrome-lined barrels and a hard case, to go with your own AR lower. It will allow any standard AR-type rifle to have a quick change barrel. This can be assembled in less than one minute without the use of any tools. It also provides a compact carry capability in a hard case or in 3-day pack (an $1,100 value),
  5. Two cases of Mountain House freeze-dried assorted entrees in #10 cans, courtesy of Ready Made Resources (a $350 value),
  6. A $250 gift certificate good for any product from Sunflower Ammo,
  7. American Gunsmithing Institute (AGI) is providing a $300 certificate good towards any of their DVD training courses.

Second Prize:

  1. A gift certificate from Quantum Harvest LLC (up to a $2,200 value) good for 12% off the purchase of any of their sun-tracking models, and 10% off the purchase price of any of their other models.
  2. A Front Sight Lifetime Diamond Membership, providing lifetime free training at any Front Sight Nevada course, with no limit on repeating classes. This prize is courtesy of a SurvivalBlog reader who prefers to be anonymous.
  3. A Glock form factor SIRT laser training pistol and a SIRT AR-15/M4 Laser Training Bolt, courtesy of Next Level Training, which have a combined retail value of $589,
  4. A Three-Day Deluxe Emergency Kit from Emergency Essentials (a $190 value),
  5. Two 1,000-foot spools of full mil-spec U.S.-made 750 paracord (in-stock colors only) from www.TOUGHGRID.com (a $240 value).
  6. An assortment of products along with a one hour consultation on health and wellness from Pruitt’s Tree Resin (a $265 value).

Third Prize:

  1. Three sets each of made-in-USA regular and wide-mouth reusable canning lids. (This is a total of 300 lids and 600 gaskets.) This prize is courtesy of Harvest Guard (a $270 value)
  2. A Royal Berkey water filter, courtesy of Directive 21 (a $275 value),
  3. Expanded sets of both washable feminine pads and liners, donated by Naturally Cozy (a $185 retail value),
  4. Two Super Survival Pack seed collections, a $150 value, courtesy of Seed for Security, LLC,
  5. Mayflower Trading is donating a $200 gift certificate for homesteading appliances.

Round 84 ends on September 30th, so get busy writing and e-mail us your entry. Remember that there is a 1,500-word minimum, and that articles on practical “how to” skills for survival have an advantage in the judging.



My Solar-Powered Dankoff Slow Pump System – Part 2, by Tunnel Rabbit

(Continued from Part 1. This part concludes the article.)

The #1303 model of Dankoff Slow pumps has the highest ‘gpm’ (gallon per minute) rating of the less expensive 1300 series. The #1303-24 pumps the most water for the money, and to a height that it will pump that is adequate for most situations. The advantage of a 24 volt system over a 12 volt pump, is that most surface water sources would likely be in a shaded environment, so the panels would need to be located some distance from the water source to obtain the needed amount of sunshine.  We should place the panels where the sun shines most to get the needed solar power output to pump the *maximum* amount of water for your individual requirement.

If we need 225 gallons per day, we only need sunshine for the time needed to pump that 225 gallon goal.  More sun is not necessarily needed. For example, if the system as installed produces 1 mpg with full sun, and 225 gallons are needed, then 4 hours of full sun is required to produce 225 gallons.  On cloudy days it will produce less. However, the garden will require less water on cloudy days. I use 20, or 55 gallon drums, and 40 gallon troughs to store water for times I would like to water the garden using the gravity fed method through a valve, or siphon effect, but slowly saturating, or flooding the garden could also be done.  If enough water is held in reserve for cloudy days, one could just let the pump run and saturate the ground, but we would then be putting excessive time on the pump. It’s best not to expect the maximum output as solar conditions are usually less than optimal, so give your system a real world test, and see what it really does. We should estimate that the actual output will be less, therefore we should have built in, a wide margin of error just to make sure we can easily meet our greatest estimated requirement.Continue reading“My Solar-Powered Dankoff Slow Pump System – Part 2, by Tunnel Rabbit”