Preparedness Notes for Wednesday — January 25, 2023

On January 25, 1915: In New York, Alexander Graham Bell spoke to his assistant in San Francisco, inaugurating the first transcontinental telephone service.

Today is the birthday of celebrated Scottish poet Robert “Bobby” Burns. He was born on January 25, 1759.

SurvivalBlog Writing Contest

Today we present another entry for Round 104 of the SurvivalBlog non-fiction writing contest. The prizes for this round include:

First Prize:

  1. The photovoltaic power specialists at Quantum Harvest LLC  are providing a store-wide 10% off coupon. Depending on the model chosen, this could be worth more than $2000.
  2. A Gunsite Academy Three Day Course Certificate. This can be used for any of their one, two, or three-day course (a $1,095 value),
  3. Two cases of Mountain House freeze-dried assorted entrees in #10 cans, courtesy of Ready Made Resources (a $350 value),
  4. A $250 gift certificate good for any product from Sunflower Ammo,
  5. American Gunsmithing Institute (AGI) is providing a $300 certificate good towards any of their DVD training courses.
  6. Two sets of The Civil Defense Manual, (in two volumes) — a $193 value — kindly donated by the author, Jack Lawson.

Second Prize:

  1. A course certificate from onPoint Tactical for the prize winner’s choice of three-day civilian courses, excluding those restricted for military or government teams. Three-day onPoint courses normally cost $795,
  2. A SIRT STIC AR-15/M4 Laser Training Package, courtesy of Next Level Training, that has a combined retail value of $679
  3. Two 1,000-foot spools of full mil-spec U.S.-made 750 paracord (in-stock colors only) from www.TOUGHGRID.com (a $240 value).
  4. Two Super Survival Pack seed collections, a $150 value, courtesy of Seed for Security, LLC,
  5. A transferable $150 FRN purchase credit from Elk Creek Company, toward the purchase of any pre-1899 antique gun. There is no paperwork required for delivery of pre-1899 guns into most states, making them the last bastion of firearms purchasing privacy!

Third Prize:

  1. Three sets each of made-in-USA regular and wide-mouth reusable canning lids. (This is a total of 300 lids and 600 gaskets.) This prize is courtesy of Harvest Guard (a $270 value)
  2. A Royal Berkey water filter, courtesy of Directive 21 (a $275 value),
  3. A transferable $150 FRN purchase credit from Elk Creek Company, toward the purchase of any pre-1899 antique gun.

More than $775,000 worth of prizes have been awarded since we started running this contest. Round 104 ends on January 31st, so get busy writing and e-mail us your entry. Remember that there is a 1,500-word minimum, and that articles on practical “how-to” skills for survival have an advantage in the judging.

 



Doing Laundry Off-Grid and DIY Soap Recipes, by E.H.

When living completely off-grid, without either running water or corporate electricity, I wash clothes by hand and that’s okay. One way to maintain a good attitude about hand-washing laundry is to stay on top of it. Facing a mountain of dirty laundry with no washing machine can stir up feelings of dread, so I do it in small batches on a regular basis. I’d rather head for a laundromat when confronted with a big pile of stained and stinky laundry. Days are coming, however, when that won’t be an option, but you can bet things will still keep getting dirty. So wherever you are in your strategy to get out of Babylon, or if you find yourself in a survival mode situation, you may benefit from some of my off-grid laundry experiences.

When it comes to living at an off-grid camp, the fewer trips to town the better, so here is what I’ve done about the inevitable laundry. Rather than letting dirty clothes pile up where they take up space, mildew if they’re moist, and make an inviting shelter for rodents, I put them directly into a four or five gallon bucket to soak in saved bath water and laundry soap. When the bucket is full, it’s time to deal with it. Yes, saved bath water. Don’t be alarmed. If you find yourself in a water hauling situation you will probably start reusing water just like me and my off-grid neighbors have for years. Use common sense though. Don’t keep water containing feces or animal fat sitting around. Animal fats or meat scraps not fed to pets, or feces from diapers and such are best burned or adequately buried. Obviously, if the bath water is starting to resemble a cesspool because the whole family has taken turns in it like people did in the good old days, that won’t do either. You might substitute dish rinse water in that case.

In summer, I save on fuel by setting the bucket in the sun during the warmest part of the day. Draping a black bag or cloth over it will cause more heat to absorb faster. On colder days I heat water on a stove or an open fire.Continue reading“Doing Laundry Off-Grid and DIY Soap Recipes, by E.H.”



SurvivalBlog Readers’ & Editors’ Snippets

This weekly Snippets column is a collection of short items: responses to posted articles, practical self-sufficiency items, how-tos, lessons learned, tips and tricks, and news items — both from readers and from SurvivalBlog’s editors. Note that we may select some long e-mails for posting as separate letters.

We’ll start out with this at USA Today, sent by reader H.L.: What part of the US has the most disasters? See a county-by-county breakdown.

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Reader J.M. in Montana wrote:

“I am passing on to you some information that I learned in nursing school (a long time ago) that I feel would be of great value to your readers. It is about rehydrating a person in a remote setting that cannot take fluids orally. The method uses the colon and is safe, very effective and does not require sterility or special equipment. I have wondered why I have never seen this explained in all the readings I have done over the years about emergency medicine in remote areas or under extreme circumstances. I thought of this, again, while reading today’s book review about treating burn victims. I did an iInternet search and came up with this web page which is an excellent explanation of the how and when of this life-saving technique:  https://www.realfirstaid.co.uk/rectal

I want more people to be aware of this simple, life-saving technique if or when they may need to use it.”

o  o  o

Here is a useful tool for gardeners created by a SurvivalBlog reader with a blog own: How Much to Grow Calculator.

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Reader S.L. had this query:

“While researching SurvivalBlog for information on how much bleach to use per gallon for purifying water storage, I noticed in a couple of articles you recommend Calcium Hypochlorite, and in several others [mentionomh other situations] you recommend Sodium Hypochlorite. We keep sixty gallons for our near townhome, a couple of water BOBs in storage, plus we have a Royal Berkey for everyday tapwater filtering. Water is stored in a dark, cool, dry, lower level, off of the floor.  Our farm property has plenty of water.
I know you always recommend plain bleach with no additives (scents, whiteners, or brighteners, etc), but which form of bleach (Calcium or Sodium Hypochlorite) is preferable, and is 8 or 16 drops per gallon best?”

JWR Replies:  Chlorox is Sodium Hypochlorite. It degrades more quickly but it is safer to store and use than Calcium Hypochlorite.  (Calcium Hypochlorite is most commonly sold as a powder, and is commonly called pool shock.) The problem with Chlorox (Sodium Hypochlorite) is that it weakens as it is stored, over time.  You can use less (8 drops per gallon) if the bleach was freshly purchased, but use more if it has been stored for more than a year.

o  o  o

Our Editor-At-Large Michael Z. Williamson has posted some advice: What To Do About The ATF’s Pistol Brace “Interpretation”. (Note: There is a bit of off-color language.)

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At FoxNews: Elon Musk chose us to report on the Twitter Files. Here are the disturbing things I learned about the FBI.

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Reader C.B. suggested this news about some clever technology: Using cosmic rays to generate and distribute random numbers and boost security for local devices and networks.

Continue reading“SurvivalBlog Readers’ & Editors’ Snippets”





Preparedness Notes for Tuesday — January 24, 2023

Today is the birthday of Tamara K., Editrix of the long-running and very entertaining View From The Porch blog.  Happy Birthday, Slick!

January 24th is also the birthday of René Barjavel (born 1911, died November 24, 1985). This prescient French science fiction author wrote several books with survivalist themes, including Ravage, which was titled Ashes, Ashes in its English translation.

Some good news!  After a delay to work out some glitches, we now have the credit card merchant account set up at Elk Creek Company. There, we now take 10 Cent Challenge subscriptions via credit card, without having to go through PayPal. And, of course, you can also order any of our pre-1899 antique guns, percussion replicas, knives, and bayonets. Oh, and you can also pay via credit card for consulting with JWR.  Since everything is now denominated in Federal Reserve Notes (FRNs), there is a divisor posted for payments on pre-1965 U.S. silver coinage, at checkout.  (Previously, we had priced things in silver, with a multiplier for FRNs.)  We also plan to take orders for the new batch of USB sticks through this same merchant account, but that may take a week or more for us to get that set up.

SurvivalBlog Writing Contest

Today we present another entry for Round 104 of the SurvivalBlog non-fiction writing contest. The prizes for this round include:

First Prize:

  1. The photovoltaic power specialists at Quantum Harvest LLC  are providing a store-wide 10% off coupon. Depending on the model chosen, this could be worth more than $2000.
  2. A Gunsite Academy Three Day Course Certificate. This can be used for any of their one, two, or three-day course (a $1,095 value),
  3. Two cases of Mountain House freeze-dried assorted entrees in #10 cans, courtesy of Ready Made Resources (a $350 value),
  4. A $250 gift certificate good for any product from Sunflower Ammo,
  5. American Gunsmithing Institute (AGI) is providing a $300 certificate good towards any of their DVD training courses.
  6. Two sets of The Civil Defense Manual, (in two volumes) — a $193 value — kindly donated by the author, Jack Lawson.

Second Prize:

  1. A course certificate from onPoint Tactical for the prize winner’s choice of three-day civilian courses, excluding those restricted for military or government teams. Three-day onPoint courses normally cost $795,
  2. A SIRT STIC AR-15/M4 Laser Training Package, courtesy of Next Level Training, that has a combined retail value of $679
  3. Two 1,000-foot spools of full mil-spec U.S.-made 750 paracord (in-stock colors only) from www.TOUGHGRID.com (a $240 value).
  4. Two Super Survival Pack seed collections, a $150 value, courtesy of Seed for Security, LLC,
  5. A transferable $150 FRN purchase credit from Elk Creek Company, toward the purchase of any pre-1899 antique gun. There is no paperwork required for delivery of pre-1899 guns into most states, making them the last bastion of firearms purchasing privacy!

Third Prize:

  1. Three sets each of made-in-USA regular and wide-mouth reusable canning lids. (This is a total of 300 lids and 600 gaskets.) This prize is courtesy of Harvest Guard (a $270 value)
  2. A Royal Berkey water filter, courtesy of Directive 21 (a $275 value),
  3. A transferable $150 FRN purchase credit from Elk Creek Company, toward the purchase of any pre-1899 antique gun.

More than $775,000 worth of prizes have been awarded since we started running this contest. Round 104 ends on January 31st, so get busy writing and e-mail us your entry. Remember that there is a 1,500-word minimum, and that articles on practical “how-to” skills for survival have an advantage in the judging.

But, before the writing contest entry, we are posting a special query from a SurvivalBlog reader…



A New Search For a Qualified Retreat Caretaker Couple/Family

On behalf of one of my consulting clients, I’m again searching for a caretaker couple (or family) to live and work full-time at a ranch in northwestern Montana. The current caretaker family plans to move in June of 2023, to be closer to their family.

The ranch is more than 150 mostly-timbered acres with a creek, small ponds, and a multi-acre reservoir. There are no nearby neighbors. The ranch adjoins National Forest Service land. The wildlife on the land includes deer, elk, moose, bears (both grizzly and black), turkeys, grouse, wolves, coyotes, mountain lions, lynx, and birds galore. The reservoir is stocked with fish. The property has multiple dwellings including a caretaker house and various outbuildings. All of the dwellings have amazing mountain views. The owner has the requisite budget and is making rapid progress at getting the ranch ready to function as a self-sufficient survival retreat. The ranch is stocked and equipped to be self-sufficient for an extended period.

The paid year-round caretaking position includes lodging in a 1,600 square foot log caretaker house, provided with heating and water utilities paid, as part of your compensation.

But before I can tell you anything more about this amazing ranch retreat, I need to know about you. I need to know if you meet the qualifications for employment. The ideal candidates must be able to check off the following bullets:

The couple must be:

  • Married for at least three years, in a strife-free and drug-free monogamous relationship.
  • Be devoted Christians and be on the same page as the ranch owner concerning current events of these Last Days.
  • Both under age 45, physically fit, and normal body weight.
  • Not vaccinated with a COVID-19 shot or boosters.
  • Be in good health and have a willingness to consistently work hard, and work in inclement weather. You need to have the drive to develop and work the ranch as if it were your own ranch that you were building and maintaining. This is not the job for people with a “mañana” attitude.
  • Willing to have the husband be a full-time ranch caretaker, with no outside employment. (The wife can have outside employment, but must be available for at least 10 hours a week for caretaking responsibilities.)
  • Be team players and committed to a survivalist lifestyle. (When the balloon goes up, you are staying, as part of the retreat security and provisioning team.)
  • Have good common sense, the ability to learn new skills, be handy with tools, and have existing practical skills that will contribute to the completion and smooth operation of the ranch retreat.
  • Have good communication skills, and be willing to keep in close touch with the ranch owner, who plans to spend his summers and brief vacations at the main house, with his family.
  • Have minimal emotional baggage, drama, or other “issues.”
  • Be willing to live in semi-isolation at a retreat that is a 3-hour drive from the nearest city of 100,000+. (It is a 15-minute drive from a small town with many churches, a hospital, several grocery stores, and hardware stores, and auto parts stores.)
  • Be circumspect and security conscious.
  • Have great attention to detail and orderliness.
  • You and your children (if any) enjoy an active outdoor lifestyle.
  • Be perceptive about people’s intentions and have the ability to oversee tradesmen that are hired for specific projects and repairs.
  • Apply with the understanding that they will have extensive background checks and will undergo drug tests, before employment.

Continue reading“A New Search For a Qualified Retreat Caretaker Couple/Family”



Career Change to a Durable Trade, by A Grateful Mechanic

I get great enjoyment from reading the perspectives and implementing the ideas in SurvivalBlog. This is a wonderful space to be able to share operating experience and ideas for making our futures brighter and better.

An article by Mr. Rawles dated October 12, 2009 references career paths that are recession-proof: What Recovery? Find yourself a Recoveryless Job. In the article, he made reference to difficult, dirty, and dangerous jobs. I recall reading that article and it made an impact on me and my life.
Six years ago, I embarked on a journey to find a new career that would offer greater life satisfaction and job security. As a result, I have landed on what I believe is a recession-proof career.

As background, I have a liberal arts university degree and had worked in office administration, primarily focused on management and development of business development teams in the software industry. I was in my mid-thirties when I moved from working in technology sales and sales management into a different future career path. I had been reasonably successful on the business development path and had I stayed I would be making very good money that would be at the cost of being unfulfilled and living in major urban centers.

My life had gone through several cataclysmic changes directly preceding my choice to leave office work. I was in  a unique position at that time of having few fixed assets and due to changes within my company structure my division was made redundant. I am single and have no children. I had some money saved up and received a severance package. I felt that the Lord was telling me to move in a different direction. I am eternally grateful for this guidance.

In the years prior to making the change I had considered that I was not fulfilled with the work I was doing. Often, I would consider other paths and wish I knew how to do something different. I had started to make lists of what I enjoy doing for work with the hopes that in the future I would find my path.Continue reading“Career Change to a Durable Trade, by A Grateful Mechanic”



SurvivalBlog’s News From The American Redoubt

This weekly column features news stories and event announcements from around the American Redoubt region. (Idaho, Montana, eastern Oregon, eastern Washington, and Wyoming.) Much of the region is also more commonly known as The Inland Northwest. We also mention companies of interest to preppers and survivalists that are located in the American Redoubt region. Today, we again mention the remote Magruder Corridor. (See the Idaho section.)

Idaho

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Crews Rescue Dog Stuck After Chasing Squirrel Up Tree: ‘Definitely Not a Cat’.

o  o  o

Idaho School Board Shuts Down Parents Over Transgender Policy.  This article begins:

“Parents seeking to share their concerns over a proposed school policy on “Gender Identity and Sexual Orientation,” which would allow biological boys to use girls’ restrooms and locker rooms, were shut down during a recent school district meeting in Caldwell, Idaho.

Retired Marine and newly elected Idaho State Senator Chris Trakel (R), whose children attend school in the district, spoke during the comment period at the Caldwell School District’s Board of Education meeting last Tuesday. He told the school board that they should scrap the proposed policy, warning that the district risks a lawsuit if a young girl feels uncomfortable by the presence of a transgender “female” in the bathroom.”

o  o  o

Cop: Idaho Murders Suspect Made Crucial Mistake That Led Authorities To Arrest.

o  o  o

Officials Say Idaho Murder Suspect Left a Bumbling Trail of Evidence.

Continue reading“SurvivalBlog’s News From The American Redoubt”





Preparedness Notes for Monday — January 23, 2023

January 23, 1855 was the birthday of John Moses Browning. He was the brilliant designer of dozens of guns, including the M1911 pistol, Browning Automatic Rifle (BAR) — pictured — and the venerable M2 .50 Caliber Machinegun. This is also the birthday of my #2 Grandson. His coincidental “Browning Birthday” will ensure that he will inherit a disproportionately large portion of my guns that are Browning designs.

Today’s feature article is a review written by SurvivalBlog Field Gear Editor Tom Christianson.



Details on the New SurvivalBlog Archive USB Sticks

The new batch of SurvivalBlog archive USB sticks is selling very rapidly!

I’ve had some folks write to ask about what is included in the new 2005-2022 SurvivalBlog Archive stick. There certainly is a lot!

These sticks of course have everything that has ever been posted in SurvivalBlog, dating back to its launch in August, 2005, and up to December 31, 2022. In my humble opinion, these feature articles, product reviews, columns, and quotations just by themselves are worth the price of the archive stick.

But then there is also a veritable mountain of carefully curated bonus material from the public domain.  Many of these are rare pre-1927 books from my personal library that I had professionally scanned, at considerable expense. Many of these books are not available elsewhere. The following is a partial list of what is included:

Bonus Books that we had scanned for the new 2005-2022 Edition Stick:

    • Beyond Khyber Pass, by Lowell Thomas
    • Construction and Repair Work for the Farm, by F. Theodore Struck
    • Great Poems of the English Language (1,502 pages!)
    • How to Make Baskets, by Mary White
    • Orcharding, by Victor Ray Gardner
    • Practical Plant Propagation, by Alfred Hottes
    • The Practical Book of American Antiques
    • The Royal Road to Romance, by Richard Halliburton
    • Amateur Gunsmithing, by Townsend Whelen

And all of the great bonus content from previous years, including:

King James Bible
English World Messianic Bible

Food Books, including:

  • Preserving Game Meats
  • Preparing and Canning Fermented Foods and Pickled Vegetables
  • Food Storage: Use It or Lose It
  • Canning Principles
  • Culinary Herbs – Their Cultivation, Harvesting, Curing and Uses
  • The New Butterick Cook Book
  • Uncooked Foods and How to Use Them, by Eugene Christian
  • Boston Cooking-School Cook Book by Fannie Merritt Farmer
  • Milk and Its Place in Good Cookery by Mildred Maddock Bentley

Information on Homesteading, including:

  • Backyard Composting
  • Basic Knots
  • Concrete and Masonry
  • Carpentry
  • The Practical Poultry Keeper
  • Farm Knowledge – Volume 1 (Farm Animals)
  • Farm Knowledge – Volume 2 (Soils)
  • Farm Knowledge – Volume 3 (Implements)
  • Nut Growing, by Robert T Morris
  • Fairs and Fetes
  • How to Feed the Dairy Cow

Several Medical and First Aid books and military manuals.

A wide range of U.S. and Allied military manuals, including:

Basic Visual Tracking Australian Air Training Corps
Incendiaries FM31-201-1-20
Infantry Patrolling (Canadian Army)
Map Reading & Land Navigation FM21-26
OSS Simple Sabotage Manual
USMC Martial Arts
USMC Winter Survival MWTC
Survivability FM 5-103
Combatives FM 3-25.150
FM 3-22.68 Machine Guns
Grenades and Pyrotechnic Signals (2009 edition) FM 3-23.30
Navy SEAL Sniper Training
Nuclear War Survival Skills 1987
Ranger Unit Operations FM 7-85
Telephone Set TM 11-5805-243-13 (TA-1).pdf
US Army Special Forces Medical Handbook
USMC Survival FNM21-76_MCRP 3-02F
Camouflage FM 5-20
Camouflage of Vehicles FM 5-20B
Explosives and Demolitions FM 5-250
Field Hygiene and Sanitation FM 21-10
Fire-Fighting Operations FM 5-415
First Aid FM 21-11
Improvised Explosive Devices or IEDs TM 31-210
Infantry Rifle Platoon-Squad FM 7-8
NBC Decon FM 3-5
NBC Protection FM 3-4
Ranger Handbook SH 21-76
Special Forces Unconventional Warfare TC 18-01
U.S. Marines Close-Quarters Combat Manual
Soldier’s Handbook for Individual Operations and Survival in Cold-Weather Areas (1986)
Survival Evasion Resistance Escape (SERE) Operations
Military Mountaineering
Arctic And Sub-arctic Operations
Arctic Tent, 10-Man Manual TM 10-8340-222-10
Physical Security FM 3-19.30
Basic Communications Rules
Canadian Military Fieldcraft B-GL-392-009/FP-100
Civil Disturbance Operations FM 3-19.15
First Aid FM 4-25.11
Mufti-Service Tactics, Techniques, and Procedures for Kill Box Employment
Visual Aircraft Recognition FM 44-80
Special Forces Use of Pack Animals FM 31-27
Scouting, Patrolling, and Sniping FM 21-75
NBC Protection FM 11-9
Mao Tse-Tung on Guerrilla Warfare FMFRP 12-18
Management of Dead Bodies After Disasters
Internment and Resettlement Operations FM 3-39.40
Special Forces Communications STP 31-18E34-SM-TG
Special Forces Tracking TC 31-34-4
Engineer Field Manual FM 5-34
Mountain Operations FM 3-97.6
Engineer Field Manual FM 5-34
Mountain Operations FM 3-97.6

Various Firearms Manuals, including:

  • M16 and M4 Marksmanship
  • AK-47
  • FN-FAL 762
  • Mossberg 500
  • M24SWS (M700 Remington)
  • Beretta 92FS
  • Glock Pistols
  • Remington 870
  • M1/M2 Carbine
  • Colt 1911 Series 90
  • HK 91
  • Ruger 10/22
  • M1 Garand
  • Colt AR-15
  • M1A
  • Ruger Mark II

Continue reading“Details on the New SurvivalBlog Archive USB Sticks”



Thyrm Pyrovault Lighter Armor, by Thomas Christianson

Thyrm Pyrovault Lighter Armor encloses a Zippo lighter insert in a sturdy waterproof polymer case. In addition to making the insert waterproof, the case slows fuel evaporation from classic liquid-fuel inserts, so that the time between fillings can be measured in weeks rather than in days. The case can be opened and the insert operated with one hand. It greatly enhances the usefulness of the Zippo lighter insert.

At the time of this writing, the Pyrovault Lighter Armor was available from Thyrm for $29.99.

The Backstory

On October 10, 2021, SurvivalBlog published my article about using a sleeve cut from a bicycle inner tube to slow fuel evaporation from a classic Zippo liquid-fuel lighter.

After I submitted that article, I had a thought: “Someone ought to make a waterproof case for a Zippo lighter. That would both protect from moisture and slow fuel evaporation.” My next thought was, “Maybe someone already does.”

With that in mind, I did an internet search of “waterproof zippo lighter case.” I was happy to discover that the Thyrm company makes a “Pyrovault Lighter Armor” case that was just what I was looking for. I contacted the Thyrm company to find out if they could provide me with a sample for testing and evaluation. They were kind enough to agree. Two weeks later, a package arrived in the mail.

Why Zippo?

Fire is such an essential component of human comfort and survival, that I recommend that a person who sets out for the field carry at least three distinct methods of starting fires.

I recommend that one of these methods be a ferrocerium rod along with a number of pieces of waterproof tinder. In an article that was published in SurvivalBlog on June 6, 2021, I described how waterproof tinder can easily be made at home with cotton balls, paraffin, and petroleum jelly.

I recommend waterproof matches as another of these methods. They are relatively reasonably priced, and easy to use.Continue reading“Thyrm Pyrovault Lighter Armor, by Thomas Christianson”



Recipe of the Week: Food Storage Pantry Chicken Pot Pie

The following very simple recipe for Food Storage Pantry Chicken Pot Pie is from SurvivalBlog readar D.M.:

Ingredients
  • 1 cup Bisquick Biscuit Mix
  • 1 can (1 cup) Canned Cooked Chicken (or fresh, or frozen chicken meat, but must be pre-cooked)
  • 1 can (or 1-2/3 cups fresh or frozen) Canned Mixed Vegetables
  • 1 Can (10.75 -ounce) Cream of Chicken Condensed Soup
  • 1+ Cup Water (or equal amounts of water and milk)
Directions
  1. Pre-Heat your oven to 400°F.
  2. Mix vegetables, chicken, and soup in an ungreased 9-inch glass pie plate.
  3. In a mixing bowl, stir together the biscuit mix and water with a fork until well-blended.
  4. Pour biscuit batter over the top of the other ingredients in the pie plate. (Do not mix it in.)
  5. Bake at 400°F. for 30 minutes, or until golden brown.
OPTIONAL SeasoningS and Ingredients

If you have it available, you may mix in one egg before baking, if you’d like.

For a more flavorful pot pie, you may first lightly season your vegetables with basil, oregano, and/or sage.

If you want a cheesy crust, then you may sprinkle the crust with shredded mozzarella or cheddar cheese, for the last 10 minutes of the baking time.

Do you have a favorite recipe that would be of interest to SurvivalBlog readers? In this weekly recipe column, we place emphasis on recipes that use long term storage foods, recipes for wild game, dutch oven and slow cooker recipes, and any that use home garden produce. If you have any favorite recipes, then please send them via e-mail. Thanks!



Economics & Investing For Preppers

Here are the latest news items and commentary on current economics news, market trends, stocks, investing opportunities, and the precious metals markets. In this column, JWR also covers hedges, derivatives, and various obscura. Most of these items are from JWR’s “tangibles heavy” contrarian perspective. Today, we look at China’s burgeoning gold stockpile. (See the Precious Metals section.)

Precious Metals:

Jeff Clark: 2023 Gold Price Prediction, Trends, and Five-Year Forecast.

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China’s public gold holdings now over 2,000 tons after another huge purchase in December.

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Mike recommended this Radio Contra podcast: Precious Metals, Goldbacks, Voluntary Currencies, and CBDC.

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H.L. sent us this: Tennessee Lawmakers Introduce “Tennessee Bullion Depository Act”.

Economy & Finance:

US households’ debt rises to $16.5 trillion.

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Massive Hedge Fund, Also Known As Swiss National Bank, Suffers Colossal $143 Billion Loss In 2022.

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Jamie Dimon In Favor Of A Fed Rate Hike Pause, Sees 50% Odds Rates Hit 6%.

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Reader S.B. sent this from Bloomberg: How the Busiest US Port Went From Swamped to ‘Dormant Volcano’.

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A sobering lecture on demographic destiny: Peter Zeihan – “People Have No Idea What Is Going On”.

Continue reading“Economics & Investing For Preppers”