Preparedness Notes for Saturday — February 24, 2024

On this day in 1868, the U.S. House of Representatives voted 126–47 to impeach President Andrew Johnson, whose lenient Reconstruction policies regarding the South after the Civil War angered Republicans in Congress. Most notably, Johnson had vetoed legislation that had been passed to protect the rights of those who had been freed from slavery. When the trial concluded on May 16, Johnson had won acquittal, not because a majority of senators supported his policies but rather because a fairly large minority wanted to preserve the balance of powers and protect the office of the presidency.

On February 24, 1803, in Marbury v. Madison, the U.S. Supreme Court declared an act of Congress unconstitutional, thus establishing the doctrine of judicial review. In Marbury, Chief Justice Marshall famously wrote: “A Law repugnant to the Constitution is void.”

On February 24, 1970 an avalanche took the lives of 29 Swiss Army officers in Reckingen, Switzerland.

Ready Made Resouces is running a sale on Photonis White Phosphor PVS-14 night vision monocular/weapon sights with 1900+ FOM for $3,199. These have a 10-year warranty!

SurvivalBlog Writing Contest

Today we present another entry for Round 111 of the SurvivalBlog non-fiction writing contest. The prizes for this round include:

First Prize:

  1. The photovoltaic power specialists at Quantum Harvest LLC  are providing a store-wide 10% off coupon. Depending on the model chosen, this could be worth more than $2,000.
  2. A Gunsite Academy Three Day Course Certificate. This can be used for any of their one, two, or three-day course (a $1,095 value),
  3. A Peak Refuel “Wasatch Pack” variety of 60 servings of premium freeze-dried breakfasts and dinners in individual meal pouches — a whopping 21,970 calories, all made and packaged in the USA — courtesy of Ready Made Resources (a $359 value),
  4. American Gunsmithing Institute (AGI) is providing a $300 certificate good towards any of their DVD training courses.
  5. Two sets of The Civil Defense Manual, (in two volumes) — a $193 value — kindly donated by the author, Jack Lawson.

Second Prize:

  1. A SIRT STIC AR-15/M4 Laser Training Package, courtesy of Next Level Training, that has a combined retail value of $679
  2. Two 1,000-foot spools of full mil-spec U.S.-made 750 paracord (in-stock colors only) from www.TOUGHGRID.com (a $240 value).
  3. Two Super Survival Pack seed collections, a $150 value, courtesy of Seed for Security, LLC.
  4. Montana Survival Seed is providing a $225 gift code for any items on its website, including organic non-GMO seeds, fossils, 1812-1964 US silver, jewelry, botany books, and Montana beeswax.
  5. A transferable $150 FRN purchase credit from Elk Creek Company, toward the purchase of any pre-1899 antique gun. There is no paperwork required for delivery of pre-1899 guns into most states, making them the last bastion of firearms purchasing privacy!

Third Prize:

  1. A Berkey Light water filter, courtesy of USA Berkey Filters (a $305 value),
  2. A $300 gift certificate from Good2Goco.com, good for any of their products: Home freeze dryers, pressure canners, Country Living grain mills, Emergency Essentials foods, and much more.
  3. Three sets each of made-in-USA regular and wide-mouth reusable canning lids. (This is a total of 300 lids and 600 gaskets.) This prize is courtesy of Harvest Guard (a $270 value)
  4. A transferable $150 FRN purchase credit from Elk Creek Company, toward the purchase of any pre-1899 antique gun.

More than $875,000 worth of prizes have been awarded since we started running this contest. In 2023, we polled blog readers, asking for suggested article topics. Refer to that poll if you haven’t yet chosen an article topic. Round 111 ends on March 31st, so get busy writing and e-mail us your entry. Remember that there is a 1,500-word minimum, and that articles on practical “how-to” skills for survival have an advantage in the judging.



Persistence: Thoughts From An Old Prepper, by Bulldog

After a lifetime of living the prepping lifestyle, and as I reflect upon it, I would describe my prepping journey as an evolution of sorts. Such evolution appears present not only with my life but also within the entire movement. When I look back at my upbringing and early experiences of the mid 70’s and early 80’s I cannot even remember the term “prepping”. Certainly, however, I remember the term “survivalism”, particularly as I considered myself a student of the late Mel Tappan. I think it is safe to say that in those days and to a great extent, Joe Public looked down upon…and, I think, sometimes feared the latter [the result of media bias, even then]. Certainly, it could be said that they viewed them with suspicion.

Although we might categorize these two terms as relatively similar, traditionally I have found that people typically identified themselves as either one or the other, and similarly they seemed to likewise embrace slightly different ideologies. Into this mix, we could then throw in the term “homesteader”. Although a generalization, I think it might be said that Joe Public typically groups persons within the prepping and homesteader groups together, there would likely be a tendency to see the survivalist as a bit more militant.
We would likely all agree that the events of each of our lives, sometimes even the seemingly small ones, shape and mold us. They make us who we are. They make us unique! Again, reflecting upon my life…certainly my upbringing, the basic person I became was shaped by my parents. Looking back, I can see that they always strived to be prepared and the pantry — a 16′ x 20′ reinforced concrete cellar — was always full. This was, for the most part, food we had grown there on the farm which was then canned or dry canned. I bring this up only because my parents never seemed to adhere to or embrace any of the aforementioned labels. It was simply how they lived. We must remember that they were shaped by their childhood memories of World War II and the Cold War era.Continue reading“Persistence: Thoughts From An Old Prepper, by Bulldog”



Editors’ Prepping Progress

To be prepared for a crisis, every Prepper must establish goals and make both long-term and short-term plans. In this column, the SurvivalBlog editors review their week’s prep activities and planned prep activities for the coming week. These range from healthcare and gear purchases to gardening, ranch improvements, bug-out bag fine-tuning, and food storage. This is something akin to our Retreat Owner Profiles, but written incrementally and in detail, throughout the year.  We always welcome you to share your own successes and wisdom in your e-mailed letters. We post many of those –or excerpts thereof — in the Odds ‘n Sods Column or in the Snippets column. Let’s keep busy and be ready!

Jim Reports:

We had a busy week with slaughtering and butchering an 18-month-old steer.  Lily will fill you in with the details on that.  The photo above was taken in Cornwall – an ancestral home of the Rawles family.  Howdy, cousins!

I did some more bidding on online gun auctions, in my quest to add pre-1899 gun inventory at Elk Creek Company.  I was outbid on 95% of the lots where I put in bids. It appears that Bideniflaton is still in full force. Three years ago, I could regularly find unaltered Loewe Chilean contract Model 1895 Mausers for $275 to $425 each.  Now, they are priced at $500 to $850 each!  Similarly, I used to be able to find Ruger Old Army percussion revolvers for $475 to $725 each.  Now, they are selling at auction for $850 to $1,200 each!  This is discouraging. So I’ve had to redouble my efforts at bargain hunting. This takes a lot more of my time, but I still manage to find a few bargains.

Most recently, I’ve bought:

  • An unaltered Swiss Vetterli 1871 .41 Swiss rifle.
  • A brass frame Connecticut Valley Arms 1858 Remington .44 Army replica percussion revolver. (Made for CVA by Pietta of Italy.)
  • Two Ludwig Loewe Chilean contract Model 1895 7×57 Mausers. (I had to bid on nearly 20 rifles, to get just these two.)
  • A scarce Italian Torre M1891 Carcano 6.5mm Short rifle, dated 1897 on the receiver.
  • A Trapdoor Springfield M1884 .45-70 rifle with original Buffington rear sight.

The quest goes on…

Now, Llly’s part of the report:

Continue reading“Editors’ Prepping Progress”



The Editors’ Quote of the Day:

These are also proverbs of Solomon, which the men of Hezekiah king of Judah copied out.

It is the glory of God to conceal a thing: but the honour of kings is to search out a matter.

The heaven for height, and the earth for depth, and the heart of kings is unsearchable.

Take away the dross from the silver, and there shall come forth a vessel for the finer.

Take away the wicked from before the king, and his throne shall be established in righteousness.

Put not forth thyself in the presence of the king, and stand not in the place of great men:

For better it is that it be said unto thee, Come up hither; than that thou shouldest be put lower in the presence of the prince whom thine eyes have seen.

Go not forth hastily to strive, lest thou know not what to do in the end thereof, when thy neighbour hath put thee to shame.

Debate thy cause with thy neighbour himself; and discover not a secret to another:

Lest he that heareth it put thee to shame, and thine infamy turn not away.

A word fitly spoken is like apples of gold in pictures of silver.

As an earring of gold, and an ornament of fine gold, so is a wise reprover upon an obedient ear.” – Proverbs 25:1-12 (KJV



Preparedness Notes for Friday — February 23, 2024

A News Flash:  An Earth-facing X6.3 solar flare was reported on Friday (22 February, 2024). There have already been cellular phone network outages reported.  My advice: Tuck all of your spare electronics into Faraday cans/bags, for the next few days! The photo above of this event is courtesy of NASA. – JWR

Composer George Frideric Handel, a leading figure of late Baroque music, was born in Germany on February 12, 1685

February 23, 1945, is the day that six Marines from E Company, 2nd Battalion, 28th Marines raised the American flag atop Mount Suribachi during the battle of Iwo Jima.

Today is the anniversary of the beginning of the Battle of the Alamo (February 23 – March 6, 1836).

February 23rd is also the birthday of Captain Isaac Davis (February 23, 1745 – April 19, 1775), a militia officer and gunsmith who commanded a Minute Company in Acton, Massachusetts during the Battle of Concord.

SurvivalBlog Writing Contest

Today we present another entry for Round 111 of the SurvivalBlog non-fiction writing contest. The prizes for this round include:

First Prize:

  1. The photovoltaic power specialists at Quantum Harvest LLC  are providing a store-wide 10% off coupon. Depending on the model chosen, this could be worth more than $2,000.
  2. A Gunsite Academy Three Day Course Certificate. This can be used for any of their one, two, or three-day course (a $1,095 value),
  3. A Peak Refuel “Wasatch Pack” variety of 60 servings of premium freeze-dried breakfasts and dinners in individual meal pouches — a whopping 21,970 calories, all made and packaged in the USA — courtesy of Ready Made Resources (a $359 value),
  4. American Gunsmithing Institute (AGI) is providing a $300 certificate good towards any of their DVD training courses.
  5. Two sets of The Civil Defense Manual, (in two volumes) — a $193 value — kindly donated by the author, Jack Lawson.

Second Prize:

  1. A SIRT STIC AR-15/M4 Laser Training Package, courtesy of Next Level Training, that has a combined retail value of $679
  2. Two 1,000-foot spools of full mil-spec U.S.-made 750 paracord (in-stock colors only) from www.TOUGHGRID.com (a $240 value).
  3. Two Super Survival Pack seed collections, a $150 value, courtesy of Seed for Security, LLC.
  4. Montana Survival Seed is providing a $225 gift code for any items on its website, including organic non-GMO seeds, fossils, 1812-1964 US silver, jewelry, botany books, and Montana beeswax.
  5. A transferable $150 FRN purchase credit from Elk Creek Company, toward the purchase of any pre-1899 antique gun. There is no paperwork required for delivery of pre-1899 guns into most states, making them the last bastion of firearms purchasing privacy!

Third Prize:

  1. A Berkey Light water filter, courtesy of USA Berkey Filters (a $305 value),
  2. A $300 gift certificate from Good2Goco.com, good for any of their products: Home freeze dryers, pressure canners, Country Living grain mills, Emergency Essentials foods, and much more.
  3. Three sets each of made-in-USA regular and wide-mouth reusable canning lids. (This is a total of 300 lids and 600 gaskets.) This prize is courtesy of Harvest Guard (a $270 value)
  4. A transferable $150 FRN purchase credit from Elk Creek Company, toward the purchase of any pre-1899 antique gun.

More than $875,000 worth of prizes have been awarded since we started running this contest. In 2023, we polled blog readers, asking for suggested article topics. Refer to that poll if you haven’t yet chosen an article topic. Round 111 ends on March 31st, so get busy writing and e-mail us your entry. Remember that there is a 1,500-word minimum, and that articles on practical “how-to” skills for survival have an advantage in the judging.



Homebrewing Benefits for a Prepper – Part 2, by Joseph R.

(Continued from Part 1. This concludes the article.)

After this, you will “pitch” your yeast into the wort. Pitching the yeast involves pouring it into the wort and shaking the bucket or carboy gently, swishing the wort with the air and activating the yeast. You then seal the bucket or carboy airtight, fill the airlock with sanitizer, attach it to the container, and let it sit. I cleaned and sanitized my equipment a second time, so that no bacteria would form in the sediment. I laid out a rag on top of the dresser in my room, brought the bucket upstairs, and stored my equipment on my dresser. I did not open my curtains for the next three weeks, as sunlight can contaminate beer.

Letting the beer sit was extremely nerve-wracking. I had no idea if my yeast was bad or not, and I unfortunately did not buy a second pack of yeast to save the batch in case it had gone bad. The bucket was also not see-through, so I was unable to tell if krausen was forming. Krausen is the foamy head on top of fermenting beer. It is a good sign. Be aware, if you are making a five gallon batch in a five gallon carboy or bucket, the krausen can overflow and leak out through the airlock. This is normal, just make sure you refill the airlock with sanitizing fluid and wipe up the krausen regularly, since it could lead to wild yeast. Wild yeast is a hazard for a batch because it can cause off flavors in your beer, and a film to develop on the top of your brew. I duct-taped the entire lid shut in hopes of keeping the container airtight, although it did not ease my worries much. The directions informed me to let it sit for two weeks.Continue reading“Homebrewing Benefits for a Prepper – Part 2, by Joseph R.”



Economics & Investing For Preppers

Here are the latest news items and commentary on current economics news, market trends, stocks, investing opportunities, and the precious metals markets. In this column, JWR also covers hedges, derivatives, and various obscura. This column emphasizes JWR’s “tangibles heavy” investing strategy and contrarian perspective. Today, we look at looming layoffs. (See the Economy & Finance section.)

Precious Metals:

At Gold-Eagle.com: Gold at $3,000 by 2025? Citi Analysts Don’t Rule it Out.

o  o  o

Chinese Wholesale Gold Demand Sets January Record.

Economy & Finance:

Layoffs are looming: Former Home Depot CEO sounds alarm on ‘tremendous shift’ in labor market.

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Over at Business Insider: The full list of major US companies slashing staff this year, from Paramount to Google and Microsoft. Here is a quote:

“A slew of companies across the tech, media, finance, and retail industries made significant cuts to staff in 2023. Tech titans like Google and Meta, finance giants like Goldman Sachs, and manufacturers like Dow all announced layoffs.

2024 is already looking grim. And it’s only February.

Thirty-eight percent of business leaders surveyed by ResumeBuilder think layoffs are likely at their companies this year, and around half say their companies will implement a hiring freeze.”

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Video: U.S. Senators arguing the impact of the Basel III capital requirements: “Like Taking Gun Safety Advice from Alec Baldwin!” Senator Kennedy Makes Everyone Laugh!

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Over at American ThinkerFederal Reserve records massive losses, makes up fictitious value called ‘deferred assets’ to compensate.

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Can Fractional Reserve Banking Survive the Twenty-First Century?

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Michael Burry Adds to China Big Tech Wager as Stock Rout Deepens.

Continue reading“Economics & Investing For Preppers”



The Editors’ Quote of the Day:

“Socialism, like the ancient ideas from which it springs, confuses the distinction between government and society. As a result of this, every time we object to a thing being done by government, the socialists conclude that we object to its being done at all. We disapprove of state education. Then the socialists say that we are opposed to any education. We object to a state religion. Then the socialists say that we want no religion at all. We object to a state-enforced equality. Then they say that we are against equality. And so on, and so on. It is as if the socialists were to accuse us of not wanting persons to eat because we do not want the state to raise grain.” – Frédéric Bastiat, The Law



Preparedness Notes for Thursday — February 22, 2024

On February 22, 1847,  U.S. General Zachary Taylor led troops against a Mexican force commanded by General Antonio López de Santa Anna at the Battle of Buena Vista.

February 22, 1857 was the birthday of Heinrich Hertz, a German physicist who was the first to broadcast and receive radio waves and helped to invent radar technology

On this day in 1943, Sophie Scholl was executed by beheading for organizing the White Rose group–a student resistance to the Hitler regime. She had been convicted of high treason, after having been found distributing anti-war leaflets at the University of Munich (LMU) with her brother, Hans. She was 21 years old.

On this day in 1732, George Washington was born in Westmoreland County, Virginia, the second son from the second marriage of a colonial plantation owner. An initially loyal British subject, Washington eventually led the Continental Army in the American Revolution and became known as the father of the United States.

We are pleased to welcome our newest affiliate advertiser: Battlehawk Armory. Check out their extensive line of guns, accessories, ammo, and suppressors. As with our other affiliate advertisers, we get a little piece of the action when you place an order if you follow our links. That helps us keep the lights on.

Only about 200 left! We are running low on our inventory of SurvivalBlog 2005-2023 Archive USB sticks. Get your order in soon. Many blog readers are ordering 2, 3, or 4 sticks. There won’t be another batch produced until January of 2025.

SurvivalBlog Writing Contest

Today we present another entry for Round 111 of the SurvivalBlog non-fiction writing contest. The prizes for this round include:

First Prize:

  1. The photovoltaic power specialists at Quantum Harvest LLC  are providing a store-wide 10% off coupon. Depending on the model chosen, this could be worth more than $2,000.
  2. A Gunsite Academy Three Day Course Certificate. This can be used for any of their one, two, or three-day course (a $1,095 value),
  3. A Peak Refuel “Wasatch Pack” variety of 60 servings of premium freeze-dried breakfasts and dinners in individual meal pouches — a whopping 21,970 calories, all made and packaged in the USA — courtesy of Ready Made Resources (a $359 value),
  4. American Gunsmithing Institute (AGI) is providing a $300 certificate good towards any of their DVD training courses.
  5. Two sets of The Civil Defense Manual, (in two volumes) — a $193 value — kindly donated by the author, Jack Lawson.

Second Prize:

  1. A SIRT STIC AR-15/M4 Laser Training Package, courtesy of Next Level Training, that has a combined retail value of $679
  2. Two 1,000-foot spools of full mil-spec U.S.-made 750 paracord (in-stock colors only) from www.TOUGHGRID.com (a $240 value).
  3. Two Super Survival Pack seed collections, a $150 value, courtesy of Seed for Security, LLC.
  4. Montana Survival Seed is providing a $225 gift code for any items on its website, including organic non-GMO seeds, fossils, 1812-1964 US silver, jewelry, botany books, and Montana beeswax.
  5. A transferable $150 FRN purchase credit from Elk Creek Company, toward the purchase of any pre-1899 antique gun. There is no paperwork required for delivery of pre-1899 guns into most states, making them the last bastion of firearms purchasing privacy!

Third Prize:

  1. A Berkey Light water filter, courtesy of USA Berkey Filters (a $305 value),
  2. A $300 gift certificate from Good2Goco.com, good for any of their products: Home freeze dryers, pressure canners, Country Living grain mills, Emergency Essentials foods, and much more.
  3. Three sets each of made-in-USA regular and wide-mouth reusable canning lids. (This is a total of 300 lids and 600 gaskets.) This prize is courtesy of Harvest Guard (a $270 value)
  4. A transferable $150 FRN purchase credit from Elk Creek Company, toward the purchase of any pre-1899 antique gun.

More than $875,000 worth of prizes have been awarded since we started running this contest. In 2023, we polled blog readers, asking for suggested article topics. Refer to that poll if you haven’t yet chosen an article topic. Round 111 ends on March 31st, so get busy writing and e-mail us your entry. Remember that there is a 1,500-word minimum, and that articles on practical “how-to” skills for survival have an advantage in the judging.



Homebrewing Benefits for a Prepper – Part 1, by Joseph R.

I’m a young man who considers himself a prepper. I love to pore over survival manuals and guides, stock up on resources, and prepare for an apocalypse. It grants me peace of mind in a crazy world. One day while reading a book on self-reliance, I came across a recipe for brewing amber American ale. I thought it would be a fun and simple thing to try, and when finished I could store some for an emergency and give some away to family and neighbors, potentially earning goodwill. When I did a bit of research however, I ended up going down the homebrewing rabbit hole, checking out many books from the library, buying loads of equipment and ingredients, and eventually brewing my first successful batch.

Now, why would a prepper want to homebrew? How could this benefit a survivalist? Something that stood out to me in my research is that alcohol can be used in emergencies to extend the life of the gasoline in your car. Oddly, there are some similarities between beer and gasoline, the most important being ethanol. Ethanol is used as an additive in gasoline, and more ethanol in gas contributes to better performance. You should only put alcohol in your tank as a last resort, as it is bad for your engine. The ratio for alcohol and gasoline should roughly be 1:4. [And of course it can only be used in cars that are rated to burn E85 (or more) ethanol.  That rating is marked right next to the gas cap on any recent-production gasoline engine cars and trucks.]Continue reading“Homebrewing Benefits for a Prepper – Part 1, by Joseph R.”



The Survivalist’s Odds ‘n Sods

SurvivalBlog presents another edition of The Survivalist’s Odds ‘n Sods. This column is a collection of news bits and pieces that are relevant to the modern survivalist and prepper from JWR. Our goal is to educate our readers, to help them to recognize emerging threats, and to be better prepared for both disasters and negative societal trends. You can’t mitigate a risk if you haven’t first identified a risk. In today’s column, a further look at artificial intelligence (AI).

AI and the New Kind of Propaganda

Over at Off-Guardian: AI and the new kind of propaganda. Here is a pericope:

“They want to control the formation and reproduction of “social imaginaries”.

So the idea is to use massive data collection and AI pattern recognition to preemptively disrupt the formation of behaviourally significant narratives, discourses or patterns of information.

With these tools of “early diagnosis” of information that potentially could disrupt the power structure and its objectives, it then becomes possible to nip it in the bud incredibly early on, way before such information has even coalesced into something like coherent narratives or meaningful models for explanation or further (precarious) conclusions.”

Gen Zers Trust ChatGPT for Career Guidance

H.L. sent this: Does ChatGPT give better career advice than your boss? Nearly half of Gen Z says yes.

How AI Deepfakes Threaten the 2024 Elections

Rehan Mirza of the Harvard Kenndey School: How AI deepfakes threaten the 2024 elections. An excerpt:

Deepfakes already have affected other elections around the globe. In recent elections in Slovakia, for example, AI-generated audio recordings circulated on Facebook, impersonating a liberal candidate discussing plans to raise alcohol prices and rig the election. During the February 2023 Nigerian elections, an AI-manipulated audio clip falsely implicated a presidential candidate in plans to manipulate ballots. With elections this year in over 50 countries involving half the globe’s population, there are fears deepfakes could seriously undermine their integrity.”

Continue reading“The Survivalist’s Odds ‘n Sods”





Preparedness Notes for Wednesday — February 21, 2024

On February 21, 1947, Edwin Land (pictured) presented his Polaroid photo product, the world’s first instant photos, in New York City.

On February 21, 1972, Richard Nixon became the first US President to visit China, normalizing relations between the countries in a meeting with Chinese leader Mao Zedong in Beijing.

On February 21, 1995, American businessman and adventurer Steve Fossett became the first person to fly solo across the Pacific Ocean in a balloon. It was the first of his many aviation records.

SurvivalBlog Writing Contest

Today we present another entry for Round 111 of the SurvivalBlog non-fiction writing contest. The prizes for this round include:

First Prize:

  1. The photovoltaic power specialists at Quantum Harvest LLC  are providing a store-wide 10% off coupon. Depending on the model chosen, this could be worth more than $2,000.
  2. A Gunsite Academy Three Day Course Certificate. This can be used for any of their one, two, or three-day course (a $1,095 value),
  3. A Peak Refuel “Wasatch Pack” variety of 60 servings of premium freeze-dried breakfasts and dinners in individual meal pouches — a whopping 21,970 calories, all made and packaged in the USA — courtesy of Ready Made Resources (a $359 value),
  4. American Gunsmithing Institute (AGI) is providing a $300 certificate good towards any of their DVD training courses.
  5. Two sets of The Civil Defense Manual, (in two volumes) — a $193 value — kindly donated by the author, Jack Lawson.

Second Prize:

  1. A SIRT STIC AR-15/M4 Laser Training Package, courtesy of Next Level Training, that has a combined retail value of $679
  2. Two 1,000-foot spools of full mil-spec U.S.-made 750 paracord (in-stock colors only) from www.TOUGHGRID.com (a $240 value).
  3. Two Super Survival Pack seed collections, a $150 value, courtesy of Seed for Security, LLC.
  4. Montana Survival Seed is providing a $225 gift code for any items on its website, including organic non-GMO seeds, fossils, 1812-1964 US silver, jewelry, botany books, and Montana beeswax.
  5. A transferable $150 FRN purchase credit from Elk Creek Company, toward the purchase of any pre-1899 antique gun. There is no paperwork required for delivery of pre-1899 guns into most states, making them the last bastion of firearms purchasing privacy!

Third Prize:

  1. A Berkey Light water filter, courtesy of USA Berkey Filters (a $305 value),
  2. A $300 gift certificate from Good2Goco.com, good for any of their products: Home freeze dryers, pressure canners, Country Living grain mills, Emergency Essentials foods, and much more.
  3. Three sets each of made-in-USA regular and wide-mouth reusable canning lids. (This is a total of 300 lids and 600 gaskets.) This prize is courtesy of Harvest Guard (a $270 value)
  4. A transferable $150 FRN purchase credit from Elk Creek Company, toward the purchase of any pre-1899 antique gun.

More than $875,000 worth of prizes have been awarded since we started running this contest. In 2023, we polled blog readers, asking for suggested article topics. Refer to that poll if you haven’t yet chosen an article topic. Round 111 ends on March 31st, so get busy writing and e-mail us your entry. Remember that there is a 1,500-word minimum, and that articles on practical “how-to” skills for survival have an advantage in the judging.

 



Why I Bought a Pluggable Hybrid EV Car, by R.G.

I live in the high desert in the Southwest on a 20 acre homestead within a small farm/ranch community of 200 hardy souls. My homestead includes all the typical accouterments of a homestead including wells, septic, gardens, greenhouse, tractor, barn, and animals. I recently installed a 8,000 watt off-grid solar system.

A good-sized county seat town is 20 miles away with WalMart, drug stores, grocery stores, local hardware store, courthouse, and regional hospital within that 20 mile range. An extra five road miles gets me to a Costco and big-box hardware stores. A major city is 100 miles away with all the amenities you can imagine.

My driving habits include around two trips to the county town a week. I used to live in the major city and still have financial interests there that require I go there two times a month. In addition, my kids and grandkids live 1,500 miles away in the southeast and I try to drive there once or twice a year.

With the advent of my new solar system, I thought this would be the best time to invest in an Electric Vehicle (EV) and get all that free fuel. I have not had a new car in over 30 years so this was a big decision for me. Problem: Pure EVs have a limited range between charges, charging can take a long time, and you have to know where all the charging stations are if taking a long trip. Hybrid EVs can go long distances but you can’t charge them except with their gas engine. Solution: The new Pluggable Hybrid Electric Vehicles (PHEVs) give you the best of both worlds. You can charge them at home for about 40 miles of electric travel or use a combination of electric motor and gas engine to travel long distances at a very good miles per gallon rate. Continue reading“Why I Bought a Pluggable Hybrid EV Car, by R.G.”



SurvivalBlog Readers’ & Editors’ Snippets

This weekly Snippets column is a collection of short items: responses to posted articles, practical self-sufficiency items, how-tos, lessons learned, tips and tricks, and news items — both from readers and from SurvivalBlog’s editors. Note that we may select some long e-mails for posting as separate letters.

Avalanche Lily tracked this down: Sweden’s New War/Terrorism Emergency Preparedness Brochure, in English.

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Reader Thomas M. wrote to ask:

“Mr. Rawles, do you have a recommendation for a tablet that one can use for viewing the materials on the SurvivalBlog archives [waterproof USB sticks] that are put out every year?  With all of the possibilities for real trouble, I am wondering if there is a brand or style of tablet that will work should the Internet go down or other problems.”

JWR Replies:

“A ruggedized tablet — such as a Panasonic Toughbook A3 — would probably be best.  But any recent brand-name tablet with wireless connectivity, the Firefox browser installed, and a USB port will suffice.  (You can get one with the smaller USB-C jack, and easily use a USB 3.0 adapter to mate it with a traditional USB stick.)

In my experience, for long-term reliability, the power adapter cords are always the weak link.  So get two AC power adapter cords and three 12 Volt DC (automobile) adapters. Oh, and, if needed, buy at least two of the USB 3.0 cord adapters. With all of those, you will have a tablet that will be serviceable for more than a decade — perhaps even a lifetime.

For Faraday protection from EMP/CME events, store your tablet and all removable memory media in a steel can with a tight-fitting steel lid.  A holiday gift popcorn tin works fine, for that.”

o o o

A new video from backcountry pilot Jonas Marcinko: The Apocalypse… Stealth Snow Bike OR Modified Army Truck?

o  o  o

Reader Ray  K. had this response to SaraSue recent snippet:

“I had milk fever show up in my goats years ago.  The solution is a calcium gel that you dose orally to everyone at kidding (or calving) to prevent milk fever.  It was OTC then and should be now.  It won’t hurt a thing if she doesn’t need it, but it will save her life if she does.  It comes in a tube and you dose it like you are applying caulk.  The gun is smaller in diameter than a caulk gun, and is designed to give the dose based on [the number of] trigger pulls.

I think I got mine at TSC, but you should be able to find it at most farm stores or online.  You will need to buy the [dosing] gun to go with the tube of gel.”

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