Preparedness Notes for Monday — July 26, 2021

On July 26th, 1931, a swarm of grasshoppers descended on crops throughout the American heartland, devastating millions of acres. Already in the midst of a bad drought, Iowa, Nebraska and South Dakota suffered tremendously. The swarms were said to be so thick that they blocked out the sun and one could shovel the grasshoppers with a scoop. While America has not seen infestations on such a scale since then, North Africa and parts of the Middle East continue to experience them.

The confirmation of David “Waco” Chipman as Director of the BATFE may come up for a vote before the full U.S. Senate in just a few days. Please contact your state’s two U.S. Senators again and insist that they vote down the confirmation of this horrible nominee.

As I’m sure most of you readers know, I sell antique guns, through Elk Creek Company — my home-based mailorder business. Per Federal law, these guns do not require an FFL, and are also exempt from paperwork under most state laws. But occasionally, I upgrade my personal gun collection, and consequently sell a few excess modern (post-1898) guns through a trusted friend who has a FFL. He is running auctions on three particularly nice guns from my collection, on GunBroker.com. Take a look. I hope that you’ll consider bidding:

Note: These auctions are scheduled to end on the evening of Sunday, August 1st.

Today we present a review written by our stalwart Field Gear Editor, Pat Cascio.

 



Glock 30S – SF, by Pat Cascio

I’m a Glockaholic. I love their guns! However, over the years, there have been a few Glocks that I just didn’t like, or take to for one reason or another. I love the Glock 21, and it feels great in my hand and balances nicely. On the other hand, we have the Glock 20, which is a 10mm pistol – and it’s the same size as the Glock 21. However, the 20 never balanced as well in my hand – I believe the “problem” was that the barrel was thicker causing the gun to balance a bit on the top side. As much as I like the 10mm round, and the power behind it, I elected to stay with the 21 in .45 ACP. And anymore, so many factory 10mm loads are watered down, and not a lot more powerful than a .45 ACP +P load, unless you go to Buffalo Bore Ammunition or Double Tap Ammo – and both companies produce the original hotter 10mm loads.

When the Glock 30 first came out, I was hot to have one – a compact .45 ACP with a 9-round magazine and one in the chamber – hard to beat. However, in short order, I traded it for something else, because the gun was just too chunky in my hand. It didn’t feel right or balance right. My review of the standard Glock 30 was posted in SurvivalBlog back in 2016. Today, we’re looking at the Glock 30S, SF (Short Frame) and this is a whole different animal than the original Model 30 was.

The Glock 30S, SF has a slide that is taken from the Glock 36, and it is thinner and trimmer. The nickname used by Jim Rawles for the Glock 30S is the “Glock 30-Skinny”, and it is his preferred carry gun–often with a 13-round Model 21 magazine and a “filler” ring.Continue reading“Glock 30S – SF, by Pat Cascio”



Recipe of the Week: Lamb’s Quarters

The following wild greens recipe is from Mrs. Alaska.

Many wild greens can be cooked the same way people like to cook spinach: with butter and lemon or garlic or as a creamy concoction.
In spring, we enjoy fiddlehead ferns and fireweed shoots.  In early summer, we eat dandelion leaves raw and cooked.  But my favorite wild green is Lamb’s Quarters.  It is chock full of vitamins A, C, K, iron, and calcium.  Unlike many leafy greens, its flavor does not include a bitter or sulfurous component.  It is mild, and almost nutty.
This slim plant with grey/green soft leaves, grows to about 20 inches.  It loves disturbed ground, especially nitrogen rich, like compost piles and my vegetable gardens.  I like the flavor enough that I let it grow among my potatoes and brassicas.
Like all greens, it cooks down quite a bit, so you want to harvest a LOT more than you think you will eat.  For two people’s large side dish portions, I fill a colander with chopped leaves and stalk/stems.
Directions
  • Rinse and chop the lamb’s quarter leaves and stems/stalks.  (You can eat the seed heads, too.)
  • In a large pan, coat the bottom with a light film of oil or butter and then add a bit of water or other liquid, such as broth, so the greens won’t stick to the pan.  Cover and steam over medium heat, stirring occasionally until the leaves have wilted and the stalks/stems are bright green.
  • Mix in any herbs, such as crushed garlic, salt, pepper, hot pepper flakes, and/or a squeeze of lemon juice or soy sauce and/or more butter.
  • Top with toasted sesame seeds or sunflower seeds if desired.

Do you have a favorite recipe that would be of interest to SurvivalBlog readers? In this weekly recipe column, we place emphasis on recipes that use long term storage foods, recipes for wild game, dutch oven and slow cooker recipes, and any that use home garden produce. If you have any favorite recipes, then please send them via e-mail. Thanks!



Economics & Investing For Preppers

Here are the latest news items and commentary on current economics news, market trends, stocks, investing opportunities, and the precious metals markets. We also cover hedges, derivatives, and obscura. Most of these items are from the “tangibles heavy” contrarian perspective of SurvivalBlog’s Founder and Senior Editor, JWR. Today, we look at labor shortages in the railroad industry. (See the Economy & Finance section.)

Precious Metals:

Mike in Alaska wrote to mention a free online precious metals price calculator.

o  o  o

Arkadiusz Sieroń: Gold’s Behavior in Various Parallel Inflation Universes.

Economy & Finance:

First up, at Wolf Street: After Slashing 33% of Workers in 6 Years, Railroads Complain about Labor Shortages, amid Uproar over Slow Shipments. An excerpt:

“Railroads are grappling with a weird phenomenon that is a combination of “labor shortages” and 12.6 million people still claiming some form of unemployment compensation, amid stimulus-fueled demand.

And this comes after railroads had spent six years shedding employees in order to tickle Wall Street analysts and pump up stock prices. The North American Class 1 freight railroads combined – BNSF, Union Pacific, Norfolk Southern, CSX, Canadian National, Kansas City Southern, and Canadian Pacific – have tried to streamline their operations, using fewer but longer trains and making other changes, including under the strategy of “precision scheduled railroading,” implemented first by Canadian National, then by CSX.”

o  o  o

Ted Kavadas: The U.S. Economic Situation – July 23, 2021 Update.

o  o  o

At Zero Hedge: Yields Hit Session High After 20Y Auction Tails Most Since February.

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Deloitte’s Weekly global economic update.

Continue reading“Economics & Investing For Preppers”





Preparedness Notes for Sunday — July 25, 2021

On this day in 1897, Jack London sailed for the Klondike. While in the Klondike, London began submitting stories to magazines. In 1900, his first collection of stories, The Son of the Wolf, was published. Three years later, his story The Call of the Wild made him famous around the country. London continued to write stories of adventure amid the harsh natural elements. During his 17-year career, he wrote 50 fiction and nonfiction books. He settled in northern California about 1911, having already written most of his best work. London, a heavy drinker, died in 1916.

Today’s feature article was too short for consideration in the judging of the SurvivalBlog non-fiction writing contest.

Round 95 of the contest ends on July 31st, so get busy writing and e-mail us your entry. Remember that there is a 1,500-word minimum, and that articles on practical “how-to” skills for survival have an advantage in the judging.



Clocks And Glocks Need Oil, by A.J.S.

This brief article is about the lubrication requirements of some everyday mechanical objects including clocks, sewing machines, and guns.

It is surprising how little oil is needed but it has to be in the right places.

A clock is a good example. Your mechanical watch or clock may run just fine for years without maintenance. But one day it will stop running before the next wind-up time and you will probably realize it needs oiling. This happened with one of my old pocket watches. It was made in 1899 and is an outstanding example of advanced watch production of the time. I really like the watch design and weight and especially its face. The watch has been through a few hands before I got it and shows obvious wear. There was a repair to the case a long time ago which is obvious and the person before me put it on a buffing wheel to get the scratches out of the exterior and in doing so unfortunately removed much of the relief design. So it is not a museum piece. It is just a watch I like to look at every day and it sits on my book shelf. I would wind it every morning as part of my routine.

It stopped running one day so I took it to my local watch repairman who makes a good living just replacing batteries in modern watches. He is a skilled craftsman with whom I have done business for many years and I trust his opinion. He looked at it and said it was not worth much effort unless it had extreme emotional value which it did not. He said modern oiling practices require that he take the watch apart completely. Then he puts the parts in an electronic cleaning process. Then he assembles and oils. It takes about two months with his backlog and would cost several hundred dollars.Continue reading“Clocks And Glocks Need Oil, by A.J.S.”



JWR’s Meme Of The Week:

The latest meme created by JWR:

 

To share this, you can find it here: https://kapwi.ng/c/s8tS8lkh

Meme Text:

Biden-Harris Administration Statist Logic: It Would Egregiously Violate the 1st Amendment to Have the White House Censor Facebook Posts.

But Jen Psaki Says It Is Okay For The White House to “Flag” Facebook Posts and Ask Facebook to Censor Them.

Related News Links:

https://dailycaller.com/2021/07/20/media-white-house-line-social-media-censorship-jen-psaki-peter-doocy/

and

https://spectatorworld.com/topic/joe-biden-digital-serfs-misinformation-jen-psaki-facebook/



The Editors’ Quote of the Day:

“Now the Spirit speaketh expressly, that in the latter times some shall depart from the faith, giving heed to seducing spirits, and doctrines of devils;

Speaking lies in hypocrisy; having their conscience seared with a hot iron;

Forbidding to marry, and commanding to abstain from meats, which God hath created to be received with thanksgiving of them which believe and know the truth.

For every creature of God is good, and nothing to be refused, if it be received with thanksgiving:

For it is sanctified by the word of God and prayer.

If thou put the brethren in remembrance of these things, thou shalt be a good minister of Jesus Christ, nourished up in the words of faith and of good doctrine, whereunto thou hast attained.

But refuse profane and old wives’ fables, and exercise thyself rather unto godliness.

For bodily exercise profiteth little: but godliness is profitable unto all things, having promise of the life that now is, and of that which is to come.

This is a faithful saying and worthy of all acceptation.

For therefore we both labour and suffer reproach, because we trust in the living God, who is the Saviour of all men, specially of those that believe.

These things command and teach.

Let no man despise thy youth; but be thou an example of the believers, in word, in conversation, in charity, in spirit, in faith, in purity.

Till I come, give attendance to reading, to exhortation, to doctrine.

Neglect not the gift that is in thee, which was given thee by prophecy, with the laying on of the hands of the presbytery.

Meditate upon these things; give thyself wholly to them; that thy profiting may appear to all.

Take heed unto thyself, and unto the doctrine; continue in them: for in doing this thou shalt both save thyself, and them that hear thee.” – 1 Timothy 4 (KJV)



Preparedness Notes for Saturday — July 24, 2021

The late Jerry Ahern passed away on this day, July 24th, in 2012. His survivalist novels created an entire genre.

SurvivalBlog Writing Contest

Today we present another entry for Round 95 of the SurvivalBlog non-fiction writing contest. The prizes for this round include:

First Prize:

  1. The photovoltaic power specialists at Quantum Harvest LLC  are providing a store-wide 10% off coupon. Depending on the model chosen, this could be worth more than $2000.
  2. A Gunsite Academy Three Day Course Certificate. This can be used for any of their one, two, or three-day course (a $1,095 value),
  3. A course certificate from onPoint Tactical for the prize winner’s choice of three-day civilian courses, excluding those restricted for military or government teams. Three-day onPoint courses normally cost $795,
  4. DRD Tactical is providing a 5.56 NATO QD Billet upper. These have hammer forged, chrome-lined barrels and a hard case, to go with your own AR lower. It will allow any standard AR-type rifle to have a quick change barrel. This can be assembled in less than one minute without the use of any tools. It also provides a compact carry capability in a hard case or in 3-day pack (a $1,100 value),
  5. Two cases of Mountain House freeze-dried assorted entrees in #10 cans, courtesy of Ready Made Resources (a $350 value),
  6. A $250 gift certificate good for any product from Sunflower Ammo,
  7. American Gunsmithing Institute (AGI) is providing a $300 certificate good towards any of their DVD training courses.

Second Prize:

  1. A Front Sight Lifetime Diamond Membership, providing lifetime free training at any Front Sight Nevada course, with no limit on repeating classes. This prize is courtesy of a SurvivalBlog reader who prefers to be anonymous.
  2. A Glock form factor SIRT laser training pistol and a SIRT AR-15/M4 Laser Training Bolt, courtesy of Next Level Training, that have a combined retail value of $589,
  3. Two 1,000-foot spools of full mil-spec U.S.-made 750 paracord (in-stock colors only) from www.TOUGHGRID.com (a $240 value).
  4. An Israeli CBRN Gas Mask with Hydration Straw and two Extra 40mm NATO Filter s – Manufactured in 2020 (a $229.99 value), courtesy of McGuire Army-Navy.
  5. Naturally Cozy is donating a “Prepper Pack” Menstrual Kit.  This kit contains 18 pads and it comes vacuum-sealed for long term storage or slips easily into a bugout bag.  The value of this kit is $220.
  6. An assortment of products along with a one-hour consultation on health and wellness from Pruitt’s Tree Resin (a $265 value).

Third Prize:

  1. Three sets each of made-in-USA regular and wide-mouth reusable canning lids. (This is a total of 300 lids and 600 gaskets.) This prize is courtesy of Harvest Guard (a $270 value)
  2. A Royal Berkey water filter, courtesy of Directive 21 (a $275 value),
  3. Siege Stoves is generously donating a SIEGE® STOVE kit, including a Titanium Gen 3 Flat-Pack Stove with titanium Cross-Members and a variety of bonus items including a Large Folding Grill, a pair of Side Toasters, a Compact Fire Poker, and an extra set of stainless steel universal Cross-Members. (In all, a $200 value.)
  4. Two Super Survival Pack seed collections, a $150 value, courtesy of Seed for Security, LLC,
  5. A transferable $150 purchase credit from Elk Creek Company, toward the purchase of any pre-1899 antique gun. There is no paperwork required for delivery of pre-1899 guns into most states, making them the last bastion of firearms purchasing privacy!

Round 95 ends on July 31st, so get busy writing and e-mail us your entry. Remember that there is a 1,500-word minimum, and that articles on practical “how-to” skills for survival have an advantage in the judging.



Gear Review: LogOX Forester Package, by The Novice

According to the Oxford English Dictionary, a cant hook is: “A hinged metal hook at the end of a long handle, used for gripping and rolling logs.” One refinement of the cant hook is the timberjack, which attaches a stand to a cant hook, enabling the user to turn and elevate smaller logs, thus allowing the user to cut those logs without the saw coming in contact with the ground.

I own a 48-inch Ironton Wooden Handle Timberjack. It is an extremely useful tool. It allows me to roll larger logs and elevate smaller logs that I would otherwise have difficulty moving. The drawbacks are that the Ironton Timberjack is heavy, unwieldy, and often has trouble gripping logs larger than 10 inches in diameter.

Earlier this year, I saw an online advertisement for a tool called the LogOX. I was initially interested in the tool as an improved cant hook, since the angle of the hook looked better designed to grip logs of various sizes.

With that in mind, I contacted LogOX to see if I could borrow a 3-in-1 Forestry Tool for testing and evaluation. LogOX Co-Founder and General Manager, Austin Roberts, was kind enough to respond to my inquiry. We began a week-long conversation which culminated in Mr. Roberts agreeing to send me a Forester Package. In addition to the 3-in-1 tool, the Forester Package includes a pickaroon attachment, a hauler holster, and a gear bag.

During our conversation, Mr. Roberts encouraged me to view their 19-minute video. The shipping confirmation repeated this recommendation. The video reveals that Mr. Roberts is not just a desk jockey. He is fit, skilled with a chainsaw, and possesses sound practical knowledge about harvesting timber. The video was filled with helpful tips about how to get the most out of the Forester Package.Continue reading“Gear Review: LogOX Forester Package, by The Novice”



Editors’ Prepping Progress

To be prepared for a crisis, every Prepper must establish goals and make long-term and short-term plans. In this column, the SurvivalBlog editors review their week’s prep activities and planned prep activities for the coming week. These range from healthcare and gear purchases to gardening, ranch improvements, bug out bag fine-tuning, and food storage. This is something akin to our Retreat Owner Profiles, but written incrementally and in detail, throughout the year.  We always welcome you to share your own successes and wisdom in your e-mailed letters. We post many of those — or excerpts thereof — in this column, in the Odds ‘n Sods Column, and in the Snippets column. Let’s keep busy and be ready!

Jim Reports:

My annual firewood cutting ritual is nearly complete. All of the wood is now stacked up near our woodshed. I still have some crosscutting to do, as well as some splitting. But the hard part of the job is over!

This week we also replaced our hot water heater.  I also did some work on building a new pasture cross-fence.

Now on to Lily’s part of the report…

Continue reading“Editors’ Prepping Progress”



The Editors’ Quote of the Day:

“I cried unto God with my voice, even unto God with my voice; and he gave ear unto me.

In the day of my trouble I sought the Lord: my sore ran in the night, and ceased not: my soul refused to be comforted.

I remembered God, and was troubled: I complained, and my spirit was overwhelmed. Selah.

Thou holdest mine eyes waking: I am so troubled that I cannot speak.

I have considered the days of old, the years of ancient times.

I call to remembrance my song in the night: I commune with mine own heart: and my spirit made diligent search.

Will the Lord cast off for ever? and will he be favourable no more?

Is his mercy clean gone for ever? doth his promise fail for evermore?

Hath God forgotten to be gracious? hath he in anger shut up his tender mercies? Selah.

And I said, This is my infirmity: but I will remember the years of the right hand of the most High.

I will remember the works of the Lord: surely I will remember thy wonders of old.

I will meditate also of all thy work, and talk of thy doings.

Thy way, O God, is in the sanctuary: who is so great a God as our God?

Thou art the God that doest wonders: thou hast declared thy strength among the people.

Thou hast with thine arm redeemed thy people, the sons of Jacob and Joseph. Selah.

The waters saw thee, O God, the waters saw thee; they were afraid: the depths also were troubled.

The clouds poured out water: the skies sent out a sound: thine arrows also went abroad.

The voice of thy thunder was in the heaven: the lightnings lightened the world: the earth trembled and shook.

Thy way is in the sea, and thy path in the great waters, and thy footsteps are not known.

Thou leddest thy people like a flock by the hand of Moses and Aaron.” – Psalm 77 (KJV)



Preparedness Notes for Friday — July 23, 2021

On July 23rd, 1982, outside Santa Clarita, California, actor Vic Morrow (of Combat! fame) and two children were killed when a helicopter crashed onto them while shooting a scene from Twilight Zone: The Movie.

SurvivalBlog Writing Contest

Today we present another entry for Round 95 of the SurvivalBlog non-fiction writing contest. The prizes for this round include:

First Prize:

  1. The photovoltaic power specialists at Quantum Harvest LLC  are providing a store-wide 10% off coupon. Depending on the model chosen, this could be worth more than $2000.
  2. A Gunsite Academy Three Day Course Certificate. This can be used for any of their one, two, or three-day course (a $1,095 value),
  3. A course certificate from onPoint Tactical for the prize winner’s choice of three-day civilian courses, excluding those restricted for military or government teams. Three-day onPoint courses normally cost $795,
  4. DRD Tactical is providing a 5.56 NATO QD Billet upper. These have hammer forged, chrome-lined barrels and a hard case, to go with your own AR lower. It will allow any standard AR-type rifle to have a quick change barrel. This can be assembled in less than one minute without the use of any tools. It also provides a compact carry capability in a hard case or in 3-day pack (a $1,100 value),
  5. Two cases of Mountain House freeze-dried assorted entrees in #10 cans, courtesy of Ready Made Resources (a $350 value),
  6. A $250 gift certificate good for any product from Sunflower Ammo,
  7. American Gunsmithing Institute (AGI) is providing a $300 certificate good towards any of their DVD training courses.

Second Prize:

  1. A Front Sight Lifetime Diamond Membership, providing lifetime free training at any Front Sight Nevada course, with no limit on repeating classes. This prize is courtesy of a SurvivalBlog reader who prefers to be anonymous.
  2. A Glock form factor SIRT laser training pistol and a SIRT AR-15/M4 Laser Training Bolt, courtesy of Next Level Training, that have a combined retail value of $589,
  3. Two 1,000-foot spools of full mil-spec U.S.-made 750 paracord (in-stock colors only) from www.TOUGHGRID.com (a $240 value).
  4. An Israeli CBRN Gas Mask with Hydration Straw and two Extra 40mm NATO Filter s – Manufactured in 2020 (a $229.99 value), courtesy of McGuire Army-Navy.
  5. Naturally Cozy is donating a “Prepper Pack” Menstrual Kit.  This kit contains 18 pads and it comes vacuum-sealed for long term storage or slips easily into a bugout bag.  The value of this kit is $220.
  6. An assortment of products along with a one-hour consultation on health and wellness from Pruitt’s Tree Resin (a $265 value).

Third Prize:

  1. Three sets each of made-in-USA regular and wide-mouth reusable canning lids. (This is a total of 300 lids and 600 gaskets.) This prize is courtesy of Harvest Guard (a $270 value)
  2. A Royal Berkey water filter, courtesy of Directive 21 (a $275 value),
  3. Siege Stoves is generously donating a SIEGE® STOVE kit, including a Titanium Gen 3 Flat-Pack Stove with titanium Cross-Members and a variety of bonus items including a Large Folding Grill, a pair of Side Toasters, a Compact Fire Poker, and an extra set of stainless steel universal Cross-Members. (In all, a $200 value.)
  4. Two Super Survival Pack seed collections, a $150 value, courtesy of Seed for Security, LLC,
  5. A transferable $150 purchase credit from Elk Creek Company, toward the purchase of any pre-1899 antique gun. There is no paperwork required for delivery of pre-1899 guns into most states, making them the last bastion of firearms purchasing privacy!

Round 95 ends on July 31st, so get busy writing and e-mail us your entry. Remember that there is a 1,500-word minimum, and that articles on practical “how-to” skills for survival have an advantage in the judging.



Lessons Learned From Going Rural – Part 2, by Animal House

(Continued from Part 1. This concludes the article.)

The Septic Tank

The age and condition of the septic system is important to know. The older the septic the stronger the chance of having trouble; which is something you don’t ever want to experience. The size of the septic depends on how many bathrooms, the number of people living in the home and how new the kitchen is; meaning is there a dishwasher, garbage disposal, automatic ice makers, etc. If you don’t know when the septic was last serviced, go by these fabled words: when in doubt, pump it out! It is better if you can negotiate this action as a part of the selling contract, just like you would a termite inspection.

If the septic system is really old, then it is possible the tank may be compromised. Tree roots can easily damage a tank and over run the drain field. Look for any inspection records of the septic installation; if there are none, you may have a hillbilly barrel tank, which may not be functioning. An instant $15,000-to-$20,000 bill, which homeowners insurance may not pay unless you have a rider.

Inspect the HVAC System

If the residence has an HVAC system, have it checked out by a reputable person/firm. Just because you can feel hot or cold air coming out the registers doesn’t mean the system works properly. Getting it repaired vs buying a new system can be negotiated with the seller.

Wood Stoves

Depending on where you live and who your insurer is you may have to have a special rider to your policy if you have a wood stove. Call and find out before you buy. Depending on the age of the wood stove it may or may not have a blower system. It may or may not have fire bricks. If it has tempered glass on the door, have it checked as it varies by age, brand and if it meets current code. If the stove is free-standing, the stove pipe to the outside needs to be checked for cracks or holes so you don’t die in your sleep from carbon monoxide poisoning. If the pipes are rusted they should be replaced. The insides should also be cleaned to avoid a stove fire which could burn your house down.Continue reading“Lessons Learned From Going Rural – Part 2, by Animal House”