Preparedness Notes for Wednesday — August 5, 2020

August 5th is the sad anniversary of the Mann Gulch Fire in Montana that took the lives of 13 firefighters (including 12 smokejumpers and one former smokejumper), in 1949. The intense, fast-moving forest fire took place in what later became the Gates of the Mountains Wilderness. The events of that fire were chronicled in the book Young Men and Fire by Norman Maclean and immortalized in the haunting lyrics of the ballad Cold Missouri Waters by James Keelaghan.

SurvivalBlog Writing Contest

Today we present another entry for Round 90 of the SurvivalBlog non-fiction writing contest. The prizes for this round include:

First Prize:

  1. A gift certificate from Quantum Harvest LLC (up to a $2,200 value) good for 12% off the purchase of any of their sun-tracking models, and 10% off the purchase price of any of their other models.
  2. A Gunsite Academy Three Day Course Certificate. This can be used for any of their one, two, or three-day course (a $1,095 value),
  3. A course certificate from onPoint Tactical for the prize winner’s choice of three-day civilian courses, excluding those restricted for military or government teams. Three-day onPoint courses normally cost $795,
  4. DRD Tactical is providing a 5.56 NATO QD Billet upper. These have hammer forged, chrome-lined barrels and a hard case, to go with your own AR lower. It will allow any standard AR-type rifle to have a quick change barrel. This can be assembled in less than one minute without the use of any tools. It also provides a compact carry capability in a hard case or in 3-day pack (a $1,100 value),
  5. Two cases of Mountain House freeze-dried assorted entrees in #10 cans, courtesy of Ready Resources (a $350 value),
  6. A $250 gift certificate good for any product from Sunflower Ammo,
  7. American Gunsmithing Institute (AGI) is providing a $300 certificate good towards any of their DVD training courses.

Second Prize:

  1. A Front Sight Lifetime Diamond Membership, providing lifetime free training at any Front Sight Nevada course, with no limit on repeating classes. This prize is courtesy of a SurvivalBlog reader who prefers to be anonymous.
  2. A Glock form factor SIRT laser training pistol and a SIRT AR-15/M4 Laser Training Bolt, courtesy of Next Level Training, that have a combined retail value of $589,
  3. Three sets each of made-in-USA regular and wide-mouth reusable canning lids. (This is a total of 300 lids and 600 gaskets.) This prize is courtesy of Harvest Guard (a $270 value)
  4. Two 1,000-foot spools of full mil-spec U.S.-made 750 paracord (in-stock colors only) from www.TOUGHGRID.com (a $240 value).
  5. An assortment of products along with a one-hour consultation on health and wellness from Pruitt’s Tree Resin (a $265 value).

Third Prize:

  1. A Royal Berkey water filter, courtesy of Directive 21 (a $275 value),
  2. Naturally Cozy is donating a “Prepper Pack” Menstrual Kit.  This kit contains 18 pads and it comes vacuum-sealed for long term storage or slips easily into a bugout bag.  The value of this kit is $220.
  3. Two Super Survival Pack seed collections, a $150 value, courtesy of Seed for Security, LLC,
  4. A transferable $150 purchase credit from Elk Creek Company, toward the purchase of any pre-1899 antique gun. There is no paperwork required for the delivery of pre-1899 guns into most states, making them the last bastion of firearms purchasing privacy!

Round 90 ends on September 30th, 2020, so get busy writing and e-mail us your entry. Remember that there is a 1,500-word minimum, and that articles on practical “how-to” skills for survival have an advantage in the judging.



August 5th, 2020: Our 15th Blogiversary!

Today, August 5th, 2020, is the 15th anniversary of the launch of SurvivalBlog. Since August of 2005 we’ve accomplished the following:

  • Posted 33,200+ articles, letters, and columns. In 15 years, we’ve hardly missed a day of posting. All of the blog’s archives are fully searchable and available free of charge–just as they’ve always been.
  • Posted more than 5,470 Quotes Of The Day and 1,580 Bible verses.
  • Cumulatively awarded more than $1.1 million worth of writing contest prizes. (Our sincere thanks to the many generous prize donors. These loyal blog supporters deserve your patronage.)
  • We’ve inspired thousands –and possibly tens of thousands — of people to relocate to The American Redoubt and to other safe regions such as Michigan’s Upper Peninsula and Tennessee’s Cumberland Plateau.
  • With your generous help, we’ve supported several very worthy Christian charities.
  • We’ve helped to educate and motivate hundreds of thousands of people to get trained-up, teamed-up, and stocked-up. Nearly every prepared individual will be part of the solution, in the next disaster or societal crisis.  And of course, every prepared individual represents one less person who is rushing to the supermarket at the 11th hour. Thus, we in effect create extra capacity in the supply chain.
  • We’ve promoted dozens of home-based and family-operated businesses.
  • SurvivalBlog has motivated a new generation of gardeners, livestock raisers, beekeepers, hunters, and fishermen.
  • Most importantly to us, we pray that we’ve been able to witness the truth of scripture and that in some small way we’ve helped to draw many SurvivalBlog readers to a closer walk with the Lord Jesus (Yeshua).
Our Plans

We don’t plan to change much with SurvivalBlog.  We intend to continue to consistently deliver you the best editorial content of any preparedness blog. And we’ll keep our layout “old school” –without annoying pop-up ads, 10-item slideshows, or embedded videos. (We recognize that a good portion of our readers still have dial-up Internet connections.)

In January of 2021, we’ll be releasing the 15th Anniversary Edition of our waterproof archive USB  stick. It will be bigger and better than ever before. And take note that we have something special planned for this edition.

Unless one of you readers beat us to it, in coming months Avalanche Lily and I plan to write articles on the following topics that we believe have not yet been covered sufficiently in SurvivalBlog:

  • Utility ATVs for Retreats
  • Thermal Night Vision
  • Dehydrating Vegetables and Herbs
  • Footpath, Equestrian, and ATV Trail Construction
  • Coin Grading Explained
  • Home Pressure-Canning Meats
  • Frost-Free Yard Hydrant Installation and Repair

It may sound hard to believe, but there are still some preparedness-minded folks who have not yet heard about SurvivalBlog. So please spread the word.  And also mention SurvivalBlog to any potential advertisers or prize donors for our bi-monthly nonfiction writing contest.

I also want to sincerely thank the more than 100,000 regular readers of SurvivalBlog for making the blog such a great success! Thanks for sharing your knowledge in your writing contest articles, letters, and comments. And my particular thanks to the 2% of SurvivalBlog readers who are regular Ten Cent Challenge subscribers. Your voluntary subscriptions keep the lights on! – JWR



Tactical Technology for TEOTWAWKI – Part 2, by J.M.

(Continued from Part 1.)

You Can’t Stop the Signal!

Much of the gear I’ll be discussing utilizes wireless communications for remote control and data exchange, so there are a number of dynamics that need to be understood to maximize their use. First, there are the factors that impact every radio signal:

  • Transmission power – The more power used to transmit, the stronger the signal and the further away it can be received. In the US the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) sets limits on how much power can be used to transmit.
  • Antenna – The more closely the antenna is matched to the desired wavelength (or an even subdivision thereof – e.g. ½, ¼, etc.) the better the reception. The location and orientation of the antenna can also impact transmission and reception. In general, the higher the antenna is the further it can transmit and receive, and a having both the transmitting and receiving antennas in the same orientation (vertical or horizontal) will tend to improve the communications.
  • Obstacles – The obstacles between two points of communications can impact how well the signal gets through. This can include rain and snow.
  • Electromagnetic Interference (EMI) – This is the disruption of radio signals by other sources of electromagnetic radiation. The good news is that in a post-SHTF scenario the most common forms of EMI (like power lines, microwave ovens and WiFi networks) probably won’t be an issue.
  • Distance – In general, the further apart two communication points are the less likely they are to have a good signal.
  • Frequency – Lower frequencies tend to travel further than higher ones.

I know the radio purists out there are probably grinding their teeth at my over-simplifications, but I just want to provide some general ideas for how various factors can impact wireless communications. Note that most of the equipment I’ll be discussing utilizes WiFi networking and a 2.4GHz frequency, so that’s what I’ll be focusing on here.

For WiFi networks there are two common types – ad-hoc and infrastructure. Ad-hoc networks are point-to-point networks – two devices connect directly to each other to communicate back and forth. Infrastructure networks have some kind of central router device which multiple devices connect to and exchange information. Some of the equipment I’ll be discussing creates its own WiFi network and you have to connect directly to it with your mobile device to control or access it, which is essentially an ad-hoc connection. Other equipment requires that a separate WiFi infrastructure network already be present to connect to – for these types of devices you can use something like a GL.iNET GL-MT300N, which is a tiny USB-powered WiFi router. I made a field-deployable WiFi network in a box using an Otterbox DryBox 3250, a GL.iNet GL-MT300N router, a small 10,000mAh USB battery pack, some SMA pigtail cables, a USB cable with a power switch, a short USB cable and some high-gain USB antennas.

The MT300N router circuit board has two small U.fl/ipx connectors that aren’t used, so you can open the router (the bottom panel pops off), plug in the short SMA pigtail cables, drill holes in the top of the Otterbox for the SMA connectors (and seal with silicone!) and attach the external antennas to significantly increase your range.Continue reading“Tactical Technology for TEOTWAWKI – Part 2, by J.M.”



JWR’s Recommendations of the Week:

Here are JWR’s Recommendations of the Week for various media and tools of interest to SurvivalBlog readers. The focus is usually on emergency communications gear, bug out bag gear, books, and movies–often with a tie-in to disaster preparedness, and links to “how-to” self-sufficiency videos. There are also links to sources for both storage food and storage containers. You will also note an emphasis on history books and historical movies. As an Amazon Associate, I earn from qualifying purchases. This week the focus is on a sermon by Pastor Chuck Baldwin on Kalispell, Montana. (See the Sermons section.)

Books:

Sean Hannity’s latest book was just released yesterday, and became an instant best-seller: Live Free Or Die: America (and the World) on the Brink. When I last checked, it was ranked #1, overall in books, on Amazon!

o  o  o

Reader “St. Funogas” suggested this general reference book: Back to Basics: A Complete Guide to Traditional Skills, Third Edition.

o  o  o

The Slow Cooker Cookbook: 1000 Flavorful Slow Cooking Recipes for Any Taste and Occasion

o  o  o

A Complete Foxfire Series 14-Book Collection Set with Anniversary Editions (Volumes 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11 and 12 plus 40th and 45th Anniversary Editions)

o  o  o

With the Old Breed: At Peleliu and Okinawa

Continue reading“JWR’s Recommendations of the Week:”



The Editors’ Quote of the Day:

“How divinely full of glory and pleasure shall that hour be when all the millions of mankind that have been redeemed by the blood of the Lamb of God shall meet together and stand around Him, with every tongue and every heart full of joy and praise! How astonishing will be the glory and the joy of that day when all the saints shall join together in one common song of gratitude and love, and of everlasting thankfulness to this Redeemer! With that unknown delight, and inexpressible satisfaction, shall all that are saved from the ruins of sin and hell address the Lamb that was slain, and rejoice in His presence!” – Isaac Watts



Preparedness Notes for Tuesday — August 4, 2020

On August 4th, 1944, 15-year-old Jewish diarist Anne Frank and her family were captured by the Nazi Gestapo. The Franks had taken shelter in a small space in a sealed-off area of an Amsterdam warehouse along with another Jewish family and a single Jewish man. They were aided by Christian friends who brought them food and supplies. Her diary survived the war, overlooked by the Gestapo, but Anne and nearly all of the others perished in the Nazi death camps.

SurvivalBlog Writing Contest

Today we present another entry for Round 90 of the SurvivalBlog non-fiction writing contest. The prizes for this round include:

First Prize:

  1. A gift certificate from Quantum Harvest LLC (up to a $2,200 value) good for 12% off the purchase of any of their sun-tracking models, and 10% off the purchase price of any of their other models.
  2. A Gunsite Academy Three Day Course Certificate. This can be used for any of their one, two, or three-day course (a $1,095 value),
  3. A course certificate from onPoint Tactical for the prize winner’s choice of three-day civilian courses, excluding those restricted for military or government teams. Three-day onPoint courses normally cost $795,
  4. DRD Tactical is providing a 5.56 NATO QD Billet upper. These have hammer forged, chrome-lined barrels and a hard case, to go with your own AR lower. It will allow any standard AR-type rifle to have a quick change barrel. This can be assembled in less than one minute without the use of any tools. It also provides a compact carry capability in a hard case or in 3-day pack (a $1,100 value),
  5. Two cases of Mountain House freeze-dried assorted entrees in #10 cans, courtesy of Ready Resources (a $350 value),
  6. A $250 gift certificate good for any product from Sunflower Ammo,
  7. American Gunsmithing Institute (AGI) is providing a $300 certificate good towards any of their DVD training courses.

Second Prize:

  1. A Front Sight Lifetime Diamond Membership, providing lifetime free training at any Front Sight Nevada course, with no limit on repeating classes. This prize is courtesy of a SurvivalBlog reader who prefers to be anonymous.
  2. A Glock form factor SIRT laser training pistol and a SIRT AR-15/M4 Laser Training Bolt, courtesy of Next Level Training, that have a combined retail value of $589,
  3. Three sets each of made-in-USA regular and wide-mouth reusable canning lids. (This is a total of 300 lids and 600 gaskets.) This prize is courtesy of Harvest Guard (a $270 value)
  4. Two 1,000-foot spools of full mil-spec U.S.-made 750 paracord (in-stock colors only) from www.TOUGHGRID.com (a $240 value).
  5. An assortment of products along with a one-hour consultation on health and wellness from Pruitt’s Tree Resin (a $265 value).

Third Prize:

  1. A Royal Berkey water filter, courtesy of Directive 21 (a $275 value),
  2. Naturally Cozy is donating a “Prepper Pack” Menstrual Kit.  This kit contains 18 pads and it comes vacuum-sealed for long term storage or slips easily into a bugout bag.  The value of this kit is $220.
  3. Two Super Survival Pack seed collections, a $150 value, courtesy of Seed for Security, LLC,
  4. A transferable $150 purchase credit from Elk Creek Company, toward the purchase of any pre-1899 antique gun. There is no paperwork required for the delivery of pre-1899 guns into most states, making them the last bastion of firearms purchasing privacy!

Round 90 ends on September 30th, 2020, so get busy writing and e-mail us your entry. Remember that there is a 1,500-word minimum, and that articles on practical “how-to” skills for survival have an advantage in the judging.



Tactical Technology for TEOTWAWKI – Part 1, by J.M.

[Editor’s Introductory Note:  This lengthy and detailed article will be serialized into six parts.]

I’ll admit it: I’m a techno-geek. Ever since I programmed my first computer in BASIC using punched paper tape many (many) years ago I’ve been fascinated by computers and electronics, and I’m always finding ways to leverage technology to improve various aspects of my life. I use RFID chips on many of my preps so I can locate them quickly, I’ve created an extensive database of all of my preps that includes type, quantity, location, storage bin, expiration/rotation date and lots more, and I’ve created a centralized home security system using Python running on a couple of Raspberry Pis with a boatload of sensors and cameras. Yes, I also make sure I have hardcopy and analog backups and alternatives for everything in case something goes wrong, but I’ve found that by taking advantage of technology I can significantly improve many aspects of my preparations.

One of the crossovers of my interest in technology and my military background is that I’ve always been fascinated by the ways the military applies technology to support field operations. Programs like the US Army Land Warrior and SOCOM’s Hyper Enabled Operator provide some interesting ideas for how troops can use technology to support combat operations, and devices like the FLIR Black Hornet drone show how the technology can be applied today. Unfortunately, unless you have a friend in military procurement and $80K to spare, you probably won’t be able to get hold of a Black Hornet drone; however, there are a lot of affordable alternatives available that you can use to improve your operations when you’re out in the field. This article will focus on ideas and solutions for applying technology when you’re mobile in tactical situations.

I know there are folks that believe that digital technology won’t have any place in post-SHTF environments, but I would argue that a lot of the technology I’ll be discussing is just as useful in both pre- and post-SHTF situations as red-dot sights, night vision devices and radios. Most of it can last years if properly cared for, and the low-cost devices I’m focusing on will enable most people to stock up on spares and replacement parts. I’m also not advocating digital solutions as a total replacement for any single item; rather, they can extend or complement other analog or manual solutions.

One other common concern is what happens to the electronics if there’s an EMP event. The good news is that you can fit a decent electronics field kit into a single .50 caliber ammo can converted into a Faraday box. The only thing that may not fit would be a power generation system (discussed later), so you may need a separate way to protect that. I also use several small Silent Pocket Faraday bags to carry individual devices when I travel with them.

I had a couple of goals for the solutions I’ll be discussing:

  • Relatively low cost
  • Lightweight
  • Small size
  • Rechargeable/powered via USB or standard AA/AAA batteries

I’ve tried to provide Amazon links for most of what I’ll be covering in the article, but you may be able to find the same or equivalent items for less money on places like DealExtreme, AliExpress, BangGood or other China direct sites (assuming you’re willing to wait a month or two for delivery). Also, please note that I wrote this article over a period of months, which is several lifetimes in the consumer electronics space, and some of the items may have been upgraded or replaced with newer models by the time you read this, so do some research.Continue reading“Tactical Technology for TEOTWAWKI – Part 1, by J.M.”



SurvivalBlog’s News From The American Redoubt

This weekly column features news stories and event announcements from around the American Redoubt region. (Idaho, Montana, eastern Oregon, eastern Washington, and Wyoming.) Much of the region is also more commonly known as The Inland Northwest. We also mention companies of interest to preppers and survivalists that are located in the American Redoubt region. Today, we focus on a couple of more grizzly bear attacks.   (See the Montana and Wyoming sections.)

Idaho

My #1 Son sent this, from Redoubt News: Lawsuit Filed Against Mask Mandate

o  o  o

City of Nezperce declares state of emergency over Ammon Bundy’s planned rally

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Horse rescued from trench in Emmett

Continue reading“SurvivalBlog’s News From The American Redoubt”





Preparedness Notes for Monday — August 3, 2020

On August 3rd, 1914, Germany and France both declared war on each other, formally beginning of the First World War.

August 3rd, 1846 is the day that the Donner party found a note warning the emigrants that their expected route through the mountains ahead was nearly impassable. Hastings, an unscrupulous trail guide had created his own “short cut” route and wasn’t even at the planned meeting place at Fort Bridger, but had left word for the party to continue on. Hastings had claimed easy passage through the rugged Wasatch Mountains, but had left a note attached to a forked stick for the party explaining that the route was more difficult than he thought. That shortcut cost the Donner party 18 valuable days, but their difficulties were only beginning. They crossed the Sierra Nevada Mountains late in the season and on October 28, a heavy snowfall blocked the high mountain passes, trapping them in a frozen wilderness. Eventually reduced to cannibalism, only 45 of the original 89 emigrants reached California the following year.

A new listing through Survival Realty Brokerage Services: Homesteading and Wild Game in Montana. It is just 600 yards from the Canadian border. The nearest town is Eureka, Montana.

Today we present another review written by our Field Gear Editor, Pat Cascio.



CRKT Linchpin, by Pat Cascio

As I’ve mentioned many times before in my review articles, I’ve been packing some kind of folding knife since I was about five years old, so did most of my friends I grew up with, back in Chicago in the mid-1950s. My wife and I watched a movie a few weeks ago, called “Mr. Scout Master” and without going into the details, it was about a grumpy old gent, who decided to take on the task of being a Boy Scout Leader. At some point in the movie, this fellow actually needed to be rescued by an 8-year old, and as luck would have it, this little guy had a Boy Scout folding knife – as all good Boy Scouts did – back then. And, they were never without that multi-bladed folding knife. Today, they would be expelled from school if they were caught carrying a “weapon” like that. My, how times have changed. Many big cities will even prosecute you if you carry a small knife “concealed” in your pocket. Insane!

I’ve been around knives all my life, and when I was younger, I owned more than my share of cheap, poorly made folding knives – we all used to buy them from the local hardware store, and they didn’t think anything of selling us knives – even big fixed blade knives. You see, back then, everyone in the neighborhood knew everyone else. And, one of the guys who worked at this hardware store, went to school with my parents, so he didn’t have a problem selling me knives at all…and know one went around the neighborhood killing anyone with their knife. A prized possession was a genuine Boy Scout knife, and I owned several of them over the years. When I worked full-time for the Illinois National Guard back in Chicago, we sponsored a boy scout troop – myself and two other full-time workers worked with the kids back then – all inner-city most poor kids, but we had a good ol’ time just the same.

Today’s Boy Scouts of America does NOT resemble the Boy Scout troops we had back then. We had the Boy Scouts and the Girl Scouts. However, today, girls are allowed to join the Boy Scouts – and many do – instead of joining the Girl Scouts. And, needless to say, the Scouts were forced to accept leaders recently, that were prohibited from working with kids back in the day. And, if I have to explain it to you, then you haven’t been paying attention…there are numerous lawsuits that have come about because young boys were sexually molested by those leaders. ‘Nuff said!Continue reading“CRKT Linchpin, by Pat Cascio”



Recipe of the Week: Mrs. Alaska’s Greens Pesto Sauce

The following recipe for pestos from gardened and foraged greens was contributed by “Mrs. Alaska”.

Chef’s Introductory Notes: Although basil pesto is perhaps the best known commercial pesto, this delicious topping for cheese, pasta, fish, chicken or meat can be made with any combination of greens.
The crunchy element can be any nuts or edible seeds (like sunflower or pumpkin), and the emulsifying oil can be varied, too.
Herbs and spices (like garlic) can be added or omitted.
Pesto Experimentation
This summer, I have made eight different pestos with:
Foraged Greens:
  • Chickweed (bright and grassy tasting)
  • Lamb’s Quarter (mild)
  • Sorrel (citrusy)
(The three above have a creamier texture than those below).
Vegetable Garden Leaves:
  • Mustard (my personal favorite)
  • Radish
  • Horseradish (just a little goes a long way!)
  • Nasturtium  (milder than I expected from this plant)
  • Mint
Ingredient Proportions
The proportions of these ingredients can be adjusted for personal preference, but the range to consider is:
  • 2-3 cups of raw greens
  • 1/2 cup of nuts or seeds  (toasting first elevates the flavor)
  • 1/2 cup cheese (this is optional, but I usually add parmesan or feta)
  • 1/4 – 1/2 cup of oil (I usually use olive oil, but have also enjoyed walnut oil and sesame oil)
  • 2 cloves of garlic (optional)
Preparation

Whirl them in a food processor to a smooth or chunky consistency, as preferred.

STORAGE

The bright color of the pesto will fade in the refrigerator after a few days, but this does freeze well.  Because it incorporates raw greens, it is not recommended for canning.

Do you have a favorite recipe that would be of interest to SurvivalBlog readers? In this weekly recipe column, we place emphasis on recipes that use long term storage foods, recipes for wild game, dutch oven and slow cooker recipes, and any that use home garden produce. If you have any favorite recipes, then please send them via e-mail. Thanks!



Economics & Investing For Preppers

Here are the latest news items and commentary on current economics news, market trends, stocks, investing opportunities, and the precious metals markets. We also cover hedges, derivatives, and obscura. Most of these items are from the “tangibles heavy” contrarian perspective of SurvivalBlog’s Founder and Senior Editor, JWR. Today, we look at The Ammunition Drought of 2020. Gun store shelves were very well-stocked in February. But they now look barren. (See the Tangibles Investing section.)

Precious Metals:

Mike Gleason: “Government Sachs” Is Worried About the Federal Reserve Note

o  o  o

Neils Christensen: We are watching history unfold. Here is a snippet:

“The rally this past month has been incredible; the gold market is up more than 10%, its best monthly gain in eight years.

Although the gold market is looking a little overheated analysts have noted that there are strong fundamental reasons why gold is now making its historic move. Investors should expect to see significant volatility as gold trades in uncharted territory but analysts have said that everyone needs to keep an eye on the long-term picture.

The reality is that in the current environment, where real U.S. 10-year yields are -1%, gold is the last bastion of safety for many investors.”

Economy & Finance:

At Zero Hedge: A Quarter Of All Household Income In The US Now Comes From The Government. JWR’s Comments:  Face it, folks: We’re already in an early stage of The Second Great Depression. This is just the Denial Stage.  Get ready for some serious turmoil, disruption, dislocation. The real layoffs, foreclosures, and evictions have not yet begun. But they soon will.

o  o  o

Confession Time for Big Banks in Europe: Banco Santander Reports $12.7 Billion Loss

o  o  o

Also at Wolf Street: Average Age of Cars & Trucks on the Road Sets Record, Will Jump During Pandemic as New-Vehicle Sales Plunge to 1970s Level
Continue reading“Economics & Investing For Preppers”



The Editors’ Quote of the Day:

“The so-called paradox of freedom is the argument that freedom in the sense of absence of any constraining control must lead to very great restraint, since it makes the bully free to enslave the meek. The idea is, in a slightly different form, and with very different tendency, clearly expressed in Plato.
Less well known is the paradox of tolerance: Unlimited tolerance must lead to the disappearance of tolerance. If we extend unlimited tolerance even to those who are intolerant, if we are not prepared to defend a tolerant society against the onslaught of the intolerant, then the tolerant will be destroyed, and tolerance with them. — In this formulation, I do not imply, for instance, that we should always suppress the utterance of intolerant philosophies; as long as we can counter them by rational argument and keep them in check by public opinion, suppression would certainly be unwise. But we should claim the right to suppress them if necessary even by force; for it may easily turn out that they are not prepared to meet us on the level of rational argument, but begin by denouncing all argument; they may forbid their followers to listen to rational argument, because it is deceptive, and teach them to answer arguments by the use of their fists or pistols. We should therefore claim, in the name of tolerance, the right not to tolerate the intolerant. We should claim that any movement preaching intolerance places itself outside the law, and we should consider incitement to intolerance and persecution as criminal, in the same way as we should consider incitement to murder, or to kidnapping, or to the revival of the slave trade, as criminal.” – Karl Popper, The Open Society and its Enemies, Vol. 1, Notes to the Chapters: Ch. 7, Note 4