Keeping Preps In Stock, by 3AD Scout

You don’t have to be prepping for very long to know that the list of equipment and supplies never seems to end. As you move up from novice to expert prepper, your level of sophistication can actually decrease to some degree. As we all started out, we looked at the proverbial “Beans, bullets, and band-aids”. A good prepper is never really done with any one category but instead our sense of urgency shifts. I tend to shift my prepping based on a few variables. One variable is the demand. I refuse to pay $1 a round for ammunition, nor will …




Patio Herbs, Spices, Peppers, and Tomatoes – Part 2, by MonkeyMan

(Continued from Part 1. This concludes the article.) Thyme – unknown plants About three years ago, while my son was in college for forestry he would bring me leftover plants from the horticulture department. The horticulture departments from the local schools around you are an untapped goldmine of inexpensive, quality grown plants of all types. I encourage you to explore the markets these departments put on each year. I have two different types of thyme. I do not know the history of the plants. They each have a different look and taste. The seeds from these plants are so small …




Patio Herbs, Spices, Peppers, and Tomatoes – Part 1, by MonkeyMan

Introduction This is a collection of thoughts encompassing the last twenty years of slowly growing our patio garden of useful plants for our location northeast of Houston, Texas. We are located in Zone 9 that has long hot and humid summers, with maybe, a night or two each year below freezing. We sometimes cover or protect the pots or plants from freezing temperatures. Maybe the solar minimum will change all that, I don’t know. As all SurvivalBlog readers do, I will continually adapt and modify my approach for my location. I do not claim expertise on any of the topics …




Recipe of the Week: Mediterranean Chicken & Potatoes

The following recipe for Mediterranean Chicken & Potatoes is from reader Linda T. She notes:  “This has a nice lemony flavor. You’ll need an oven, a baking sheet with deep lip, and a garlic press.” Ingredients 3 lemons 6 cloves garlic, pressed 3 tablespoons fresh oregano leaves ⅓ cup plus 2 Tbsp. olive oil, divided 3½- to 4-lb. whole chicken, cut into 6 to 8 pieces 1 pound of smallish red potatoes, quartered 1 large red onion, cut into ½-in. wedges 1 tablespoon kosher salt, divided 1 pound Broccoli crowns, trimmed 1 teaspoon )or less) of freshly ground black pepper …




Handling Trash and Garbage at a Remote Home, by Mrs. Alaska

Editor’s Introductory Note:  This article will prove to be instructive for anyone preparing for a grid-down societal collapse,  where public services are disrupted. — Living off-grid, a 20-minute flight from the nearest road means not only that we receive no electricity, but also no municipal services at all, including those for disposal of garbage, trash, sewage, and gray water. So we have become very intentional about what we buy, make, and use, because we have to figure out how to dispose of or repurpose what remains. The following are some examples of what we do with wood ash, packaging, vegetable …




Beyond Beans Bullets and Band-Aids, Part 2, by Todd Albertson

(Continued from Part 1. This concludes the article.) Have a Plan The key to preparing for a disaster —both emotionally and physically—is to plan ahead of time. Make sure you know what your role is during a disaster. During an actual emergency, you may be literally incapable of thinking clearly as life suddenly and drastically changes. Knowing what to do should this happen can lessen your anxiety during an emergency. Being less anxious can help you think more wisely and logically and thus reduce the risk of injury or death. In addition, research suggests that knowing what to do during …




Beyond Beans Bullets and Band-Aids, Part 1, by Todd Albertson

Supplies like water, food, and medical supplies are essential during a disaster. However, these may not be enough. Research into past tragedies demonstrates that our mental resources may play a significant role in survival in emergency situations. We have been told that it’s essential to prepare for disasters throughout history. In the Bible, Genesis books 41 and 42, God directed Joseph to stockpile enough food to survive seven years of famine. During the Middle Ages, people gathered and preserved as much food as possible during the summer months. This helped them get through the cold winters in Europe without starving. …




Ham Public Service Communications, by Reltney McFee

Amateur Radio Operators (“hams”) have a tradition of public service. Indeed, the FCC rules, section 97.1 (a) states one of the purposes of Amateur Radio is: “Recognition and enhancement of the value of the amateur service to the public as a voluntary noncommercial communication service, particularly with respect to providing emergency communications.” Commonly, that public service is rather mundane, providing communication support for, by way of examples, the Boston Marathon, Michigan’s Consumer’s Energy AuSable Canoe Marathon, and the annual Marine Corps Marathon which starts and ends in Arlington, Virginia. Commonly, hams interact with other, non-ham folks, as in the AuSable …




Surviving a Transition to Solo Prepping, by JPK

This article addresses when the end of the world as we know it hits… but for you alone. When prepping, planning and long-term goals are done as a family it makes life so much easier. We started in earnest pre-Y2K then my husband and I were blessed to be introduced to JWR’s writings in 2008. So our preps have been ongoing and well-thought-out. From our conversion of a grid-powered well to a solar-powered pump with cistern to the metal roof on our rock house to the multi-year tree removal plan we had the big things on track. We found a …




Our Experience Living Out of a Car, by M.B.

Living in a 2008 Toyota Prius on the road in the United States during much of the 2020 and 2021 pandemic mandates was an unexpectedly rewarding growth experience. Here are the top five suggestions I have for living on the road out of your car during these times. 1. Be careful where you park when you sleep. The best locations to park for a night are highway rest stops, some Walmarts and at 24-hour gas stations. 2. Buy water by the gallon. Staying hydrated is top priority when living on the road. I like the Crystal Geyser brand spring water. …




On Thermonuclear War, by 3AD Scout

A lot of chatter can be heard and read about “nuclear war” these days. Like every other subject, there are many differing opinions as to whether or not it is going to happen. As Preppers, our goal is to survive disasters regardless of the origins of the disasters. There are some disasters that we seem to let our politics sway our opinion more than facts and some of us also become unknowing victims of the normalcy bias, nuclear war being one of those disasters. I am a product of the Cold War. As a teenager, I didn’t read comic books. …




Review of HCMAGS Tactical Pack for the Ruger 10/22, by Francis, the Semi-Prepper

I’m 76 years old and we live in a Home Owners Association communiity near a major southern city in the suburbs. My wife and I will not leave our grandchildren who live in the city but they DO fortunately attend a Christian religious school, not a public school. I have previously posted about our first steps in abandoning our home if we have to. We will not leave them but do have plans which I intended to present here for abandoning our home in case of the WROL or TEOTWAWKI but because of OPSEC will present nothing anymore on that …




My Newbie Experience Buying a Milk Cow – Part 2, by SaraSue

(Continued from Part 1. This concludes the article.) A Calf is Born and Begins Milking It’s been a bit of a rodeo, but I am undeterred. She was gentle as long as you didn’t touch her. LOL. She was sweet and beautiful as long as you didn’t interrupt her grazing on the grassy knoll. She learned to come into the stanchion, which is basically a structure you build to milk your cow in if you don’t have a barn set up to use. It has a “head gate” so that you can hold the cow’s head still, and therefore her …




My Newbie Experience Buying a Milk Cow – Part 1, by SaraSue

Finding the Right Cow My grandpa grew up on a farm in the South. When I was a little girl I asked him what it was like. He said it was hard work and dirty. I asked him about getting milk from a cow and he laughed saying, “Do you know how many germs are in that milk?” When I was a little older, probably studying the Great Depression in elementary school, I asked him “What did you do during the Great Depression Grandpa?” He said, “Well, we all went back to the farms!” In my child’s mind I had …




Signs Of The Times – Part 4, by St. Funogas

(Continued from Part 3. This concludes the article.) Vasili Arkhipov prevented TEOTWAWKI — During the Cuban Missile Crisis one single man, a Russian submariner named Vasili Arkhipov, prevented the use of nuclear torpedoes against an American warship which likely would have touched off a nuclear war between our two countries, a position our own government willingly put us into by refusing Russia’s request to remove our missiles from their border. Three officers on board that Russian sub were required to authorize the use of nukes and Vasili stood alone in refusing to consent. Most historians refer to this event as …