Guest Article: To Camo or Not To Camo? That is the Question, by: J.M.

When considering what one needs during a TEOTWAWKI scenario, clothing is always on the list. We often choose our clothing based on looks or functionality. However, when preparing for TEOTWAWKI, we need to take both into consideration, especially with camouflage! Almost every person I know plans on using some type of camouflage, whether a military or tactical pattern, as their choice for everyday use. This is perfectly acceptable, but I constantly tell them that they should not limit themselves to just one pattern. Let’s look at two scenarios that may affect what one might wear or carry. Scenario 1: You …




Two Letters Re: Starch in ACUs

JWR Wrote: “By the time the U.S. Army reached the ACU-issue period, starching was not allowed. You can be relatively certain that none of the OCP (“Multicam”) uniforms that you buy surplus have never been starched. Best Regards.” As a guardsman of four years, I have seen starched and pressed ACUs at least a handful of times in direct violation of AR670-1. You would think these were being worn by old timers of the BDU era, but it’s a mixed bag. I have seen these on specialists trying to impress as well as Majors. They are not common by any …




Seasonal Items and Survival Steps, by P.F.

It never ceases to amaze me when something seemingly trivial that occurs in my life can lead to so much self reflection and totally change the direction I travel, so to speak, in my life planning. I recently decided to purchase a spare, portable plug-in heater for my camper, in the interest of redundancy. So, off I went blissfully unaware that this simple, last-minute decision would alter the course of history, my history that is. I went to my local big-box store and soon realized an important issue I had never thought about before– seasonal items are difficult to find …




Letter Re: Cottage/Local Manufacturing After SHTF

I am a former dressmaker, with considerable experience in making clothing, and I appreciated the article on doing this for barter. However, there are problems. The first is fabric. Presumably the sensuously idyllic pleasures of going to the fabric shops in the garment district of New York City will no longer be an option. Too charred. Apart from that, while there are a few scattered fabric stores here and there, they are steadily going out of business, as fewer and fewer people sew. For the most part, assuming you can get there and assuming they are intact, they carry mostly …




Two Letters Re: Moving Females in SHTF Scenario

HJL, Regarding C.B.’s article on moving females, I have a few suggestions. I have long, thick hair that goes to my waist and for many years had the constant frustration of trying to figure out what to do with it when I was getting dirty (hunting, butchering, cleaning the barn, ect.). Tucking it into a hat never worked for more than 20 minutes at a time. First, the cap or cowboy hat or what ever was in constant danger of being knocked off my head because of the extra mass under it or blown off by our wonderful winds in …




Letter Re: Moving Females in SHTF Scenario

Dear HJL, I’m a female and had some thoughts regarding C.B.’s letter on moving females. On one level, I was a little surprised that we needed special handling but agree that there are predators who do look for the most vulnerable victims out there, whether it’s TEOTWAWKI or not. I think my concern is that if someone is attempting disguise and the expectation is conveyed to them that they will be more vulnerable, it may pump up the fear level in them and that fear will show. I don’t think it is all that easy to truly disguise a female …




The Little Things, by Claymor – Part II

Accepting the probability that eventually Patriots are going to be reduced to the bare necessities of survival, I am reviewing seven “little things” to be considered by all preppers in a bug out situation. Part one looked at the first four items. Part two will finish off the seven with the last three items. Fire Starter. Sooner than later in any survival situation you’re going to need fire. Beyond the obvious, like keeping you warm and cooking food, a fire is comforting in a hostile bug out situation. A little comfort will likely go a long way. The warm glow …




The Little Things, by Claymor – Part I

We’ve all seen the YouTube videos, watched the TV shows, and read the latest articles on prepping and survival that show stocked food pantries, high tech gear, arsenals of guns, and stockpiles of ammo, which are all necessary for an ultimate survival situation where you’re held up in the comfort of your home. However, considering the fact that ultimate survival in a real-life scenario will likely be short lived, these means will be abandoned, reducing one to the mere little things they can carry on their person and in a backpack. It doesn’t take much consideration to conclude that bugging …




How To Prepare Yourself For Cold Weather, by Prepared in Maine

I’ve been hearing a lot from friends and family in southern latitudes who are dealing with the cold. My lifetime of experience, living and working outdoors in northern Maine, has taught me that cold weather gear need not be expensive or complicated. Living in a cold climate does require some thought and preparation, but with a bit of both you can equip yourself and your beloved ones for cold weather so that you can not only survive but work and be comfortable. I don’t represent or have any interest in any of the companies listed. I cite brand names only …




Bug Out: The Good, The Bad, The Ugly–You Can Arrive Alive, by Semper Paro

I.  Introduction – Possible Scenarios.   Your automobile becomes inoperable for a period of time while traveling – it is extremely hot or extremely cold and hours to wait. A natural disaster occurs and you have to evacuate. Chaos occurs due to financial collapse or other major event causing civil unrest. An Electro-Magnetic Pulse (EMP) or Coronal Mass Ejection (CME) caused by solar flare(s) renders your vehicle dead miles from home. Or, an EMP occurs as a result of a nuclear strike (with collateral fall-out to follow). Use your imagination…in reality, nothing is too far fetched. While these are listed in …




Two Letters Re: Homemade Soap Making Instructions

Mr. Rawles, I’ve been making my own laundry soap for a couple of years now and I’ve found that Zote works a little better than Fels Naptha or Ivory.  Our whites have been whiter since we switched from Fels Naptha to Zote.  I estimate that I’ve spent perhaps just s $15 on laundry supplies over the past two years.  That’s much better than $10 to $12 for a bottle of liquid detergent! Keep up the good work and God bless your efforts. – Emily S. Mr. Rawles, I would like to add to the suggested recipe for laundry detergent presented …




Letter Re: Homemade Soap Making Instructions

Mr. Rawles: Here is a recipe for soap, not food,. This has saved us a lot of money and aggravation over the years. We decided to make our own laundry soap after my daughter (now four years old) was born. Her skin wouldn’t tolerate any artificial perfumes or dyes and she would break out in horrible acne if exposed to artificiality of that sort. The basis of this recipe we found online, then modified it to meet our needs. It includes only shelf-stable materials and is suitable for both washing machines and hand-washing. The ingredients include: –One bar of soap, …




Letter Re: Thoughts on Socks

Jim: In a recent contest entry post, Clarence A. wrote: ‘Warm up some round river rocks that are as big as you can fit into a wool sock.  When they are too hot to touch with your fingers put them in the wool sock and use them like you would a hot water bottle.’ No offense at your experience Clarence, but hot river rocks can hold moisture and can and do explode. I’ve had it happen camping as a kid, using a river rock for part of the fire ring, lucky no one was close when it exploded! it sent …




Thoughts on Socks, by Clarence A.

Extra Socks should be in your bug out bag your hunting pack and any other pack or bag you store outdoor gear or survival gear.  Now let me explain.  Your feet are super important to your safety and well-being. You’re healthy and fit. You take good care of yourself for Survival reasons.  But are you prepared to lose the ability to walk, run or move quickly without responding to pain caused by infection.  Soldiers in all recent recorded conflicts complained about their feet.  Cold and fungus cripple them.  OK, so you have a great pair of boots.  I get it …




Letter Re: Camouflage Utility Uniforms

Mr. Rawles: You made mention of the Army adopting some Multicam variants for standard [field utility] uniforms; I’m not too surprised by this. The Army’s move from BDUs (and DCUs for deployments) to ACUs, and finally Multicam, has an enjoyable history of stupidity and corruption (hard to imagine with the military, I know). Having worn ACUs in both garrison and deployment/combat, they’re wonderfully light to wear…and get easily torn up and ripped up, unlike BDUs/DCUs. ACU are also terrible at actually camouflaging the wearer, unless you spent all your time in a grayish pastel quarry….which, of course, are rarity in …