Note from JWR:

We note with humble thanks that we’ve surpassed 2,000,000 unique visits. Congrats to SurvivalBlog reader “Stealth Neighbor”, who as the two-millionth visitor. (He even sent us a screen capture to prove it.) I’ll be mailing him a special gift.

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Letter Re: Question on Two Cycle Oil Mixing Ratios

Dear Mr. Rawles, Perhaps you could help me understand the mixing ratios for two stroke oil. I remember buying the old Homelite oil, you could either buy it in a can to mix with one gallon of gas or a can to mix with two gallons of gas. Most of the new two stroke oils I have seen recently state that they are 50:1. Is this mixture acceptable for my old Homelite Super XL chainsaw and other two stroke equipment? The rep at the Stihl store by us said that the new oils are so much better formulated than the old oils, that 50:1 is good for all two stroke equipment–old and new. Does he know what he is talking about? – Mark G. JWR Replies: While it is true that some of the pre-1990 manufacturers’ manuals called out a 32:1 or even 24:1 mixing ratio, with modern name-brand mixing oil, there is no problem using a 50:1 ratio in just about all two cycle chainsaws and other two cycle power tools that are marked 24:1 or 32:1 (such as leaf blowers, weed trimmers, ice augers, et cetera). The modern mixing oils provide plenty of lubrication at a 50:1 ratio. … Continue reading

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Dip Sealing Tools for Storage

Jim, I don’t know if you are familiar with this product already but I thought it couldn’t hurt to bring it to SurvivalBlog readers attention. It is called “Dip Seal” protective removable coatings, peels off like a banana [skin]. It is, from the company’s own description two or three different types of plastic seal, “Type one coatings are the most commonly used for corrosion protection. These coatings leave an oil film on the protected part. A relatively hard coating that is excellent for long-term storage and protection from rough handling. Part numbers, UPC codes, etc., can be easily seen through any of the transparent Type One colors. Recommended dipping temperature for all Type One coatings is 350° F.” I thought this type of seal could be used as a part of a redundant system of sealing parts, etc. for long term storage. I’ve used the product myself and like it very much. If one is peeling off the seal it’s rather easy not messy at all and leaves no unwanted residue or particles as long as you check to make sure its all been removed. They have different types of seals some with oil and some without, so the user … Continue reading

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Letter Re: Low Light Shooting Techniques

Mr. Rawles: Anyone who carries a sidearm for protection should watch these three videos by Surefire: One Two Three. The first one covers principle of using light and flashlights to your advantage. It also discusses the Harries and Rogers Surefire techniques for shooting and advantages and disadvantages of both. The second one covers the FBI and neck index methods of shooting. The last covers clearing techniques in a building. I personally don’t like the Rogers Surefire technique because it requires a specific flashlight and will not work if the switch is not properly adjusted. – Bill N.

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Odds ‘n Sods:

There is an interesting thread in progress titled: “Popular Mechanics new take on Heinlein’s skill list“, over at The Mental Militia Forums (formerly called the Claire Files Forums.) I agree with the consensus view there. Parenthetically, I’m glad that I’m raising our kids out in the hinterboonies in a largely self-sufficient lifestyle with plenty of “do it yourself”–mostly by economic necessity but partly by choice. A boy should know how to build a field fence just as well as a web page.    o o o From Bloomberg: U.S. New-Home Sales Drop, Prices Fall Most Since 1970    o o o At The Economist web site: The turning point–Does the latest financial crisis signal the end of a golden age of stable growth?    o o o SF in Hawaii recommended this site: You Grow Girl–Make Your Own Pop Bottle Drip Irrigation System

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Jim’s Quote of the Day:

"It’s all wrong. By rights we shouldn’t even be here. But we are. It’s like in the great stories, Mr. Frodo. The ones that really mattered. Full of darkness and danger they were. And sometimes you didn’t want to know the end. Because how could the end be happy? How could the world go back to the way it was when so much bad had happened. But in the end, it’s only a passing thing, this shadow. Even darkness must pass. A new day will come. And when the sun shines it will shine out the clearer. Those were the stories that stayed with you. That meant something. Even if you were too small to understand why. But I think, Mr. Frodo, I do understand. I know now. Folk in those stories had lots of chances of turning back only they didn’t. They kept going. Because they were holding on to something." "What are we holding on to, Sam?" "That there’s some good in this world, Mr. Frodo. And it’s worth fighting for." – J.R.R. Tolkien, The Lord of The Rings

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Notes from JWR:

Today we are pleased to feature an excerpt from the novel Enemies Foreign And Domestic by Matthew Bracken. The story is set in the near future, as a small scale resistance movement develops in reaction to the end of constitutional liberty. The author is a SurvivalBlog reader, former US Navy SEAL, novelist, and an accomplished blue water yachtsman. I trust that like me, you find survival fiction a useful tool for “thinking outside the box” and considering “what ifs”, in preparedness planning.

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“The Checkpoint” — An Excerpt from the Novel Enemies Foreign And Domestic by Matthew Bracken

Brad was driving his red pickup with Ranya snuggling against him as they crossed the five mile wide I-664 James River Bridge-Tunnel from Newport News. They covered in only a few minutes the same water which they had sailed upon yesterday at a tenth of their present speed. It was a little past four PM on the warm Sunday afternoon when they passed back onto the northern shore of Suffolk County, almost within sight of the burned ruins of the Edmonds house. Neither one of them spoke of it, although they both stared in that direction. Driving down from Poquoson they had been listening to the news on AM talk radio. The latest shock to hit Tidewater was an accidental police shooting. Either Virginia Beach police or an FBI team—it wasn’t clear which—had shot a man in the head at a dramatic felony traffic stop. The man, whose identity had not been released yet, had been pulled over in his black full-sized pickup truck on Laskin Road, misidentified as a possible suspect in the shooting of Attorney General Sanderson. Blocked in by their patrol cars and surrounded by uniformed police and undercover agents, the unlucky driver had been simultaneously ordered … Continue reading

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Odds ‘n Sods:

I was doing some web surfing and stumbled across this video clip on American Gun Owners. I haven’t yet seen the book on which it is based, but the video is remarkably unbiased. I think that it would be a good introduction to the American “gun culture” for SurvivalBlog readers that live in countries that restrict firearms ownership.    o o o A Financial Sense editorial by Eric Englund: From Prime to Sub-Prime: America’s Mortgage Meltdown Has Just Begun    o o o The WRSA has a high power rifle shooting clinic scheduled for October 6-7 in Brookings, Oregon. These clinics are great way to get high quality rifle shooting instruction for a fraction of what you’d pay at one of the big name shooting schools. Don’t miss out!    o o o RBS forwarded this: No end in sight for Idaho’s growth

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Jim’s Quote of the Day:

“I cannot guarantee that you will not get hurt or killed whether you follow my advice or not. Just keep in mind that people who never lifted anything that could be classified as ‘heavy’ got hernias from coughing and died of a stroke when they strained on a toilet. As someone smart said, fear of doing things does not prevent you from dying, only from living.” – Pavel Tsatsouline

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Notes from JWR:

We are rapidly approaching the two million unique visits milestone, and we have readers all over the planet. Thanks for making SurvivalBlog such a huge success. Please keep spreading the word. Links at your personal web page and/or in your e-mail footer would be greatly appreciated. The bidding is now at $460 in the SurvivalBlog benefit auction, for a scarce pre-1899 antique Finnish M39 Mosin Nagant rifle from my personal collection. This rifle was rebarreled by Valmet during WWII, and is in excellent condition. It comes with a replica bayonet, original sling, and original muzzle cap. Since the receiver for this rifle was made in 1898, it can be mailed directly to the winning bidder’s doorstep, with no FFL paperwork! The auction ends on October 15th.. Just e-mail us your bid.

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Letter Re: Questions on Underground CONEXes

Hello Mr. Rawles I’m a fairly new reader of your site and have been meandering through your archives and checking back periodically. It’s a wonderful site you have here, and I’ve found your articles to be quite interesting and informative. My personal concerns for the future are more focused on nuclear events than fiscal ones, but in either case I’m likely screwed as I am living on the east coast in close proximity to dense population centers and terrorist/military targets. As of late however I have been considering buying a few acres in one of the rural areas a few hours away. Someplace where I could build a small cottage to go and relax every now and then. Perhaps with a few unobtrusive modifications to make it a bit more disaster resistant. But I want to do something that’s both low budget and low visibility. Especially since I hope to move away from this area in the years to come, and don’t want to spend a fortune setting up something I’ll be a thousand miles away from in times of trouble. (Or trying to sell a place with expensive hidden features I don’t want to mention publicly… I believe you … Continue reading

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