Comfort for the Burned and Wounded, by C.J.

Editor’s Introductory Note: The following is a eview and summary of a book by John W. Keim. This article is intended for informational purposes only, and should not be considered medical advice. Get any patient with severe burns to a hospital emergency room, immediately. If you have an interest in herbal medicine or just want to be prepared if modern medical care is not available in the future, I recommend reading this wonderfully informative book that I discovered a few years ago. The book is titled “Comfort for the Burned and Wounded”, by John W. Keim. Mr. Keim is not …




Post-TEOTWAWKI Wound Care – Part 2, by M.V.

(Continued from Part 1. This concludes the article.) Another type of abscess which might be encountered would be a perianal or perirectal abscess. Though hygiene can play a role it is typically caused by an infection in the perianal crypts which extends into the subcutaneous space. Pain and swelling typically occur as in all abscesses and prompt drainage is necessary. The longer that these progress; the more extensive that they become, so time is of the essence. Drainage is as previously described and your incision should be radially away from the anus as if the anus was a hub on …




Post-TEOTWAWKI Wound Care – Part 1, by M.V.

Wound care is not the most glamorous of subjects but might come in handy down the road. We are not going to discuss the care we can provide in the here and now, which can be quite advanced as well as incredibly costly, but what we can do in a pinch if needed with stuff we have hanging around. This first part is the basic science of wound healing in a nutshell. It might glaze your eyes over but bear with it since it is always good to know what is actually happening in order to fix it. It goes …




Front Yard Pharmacy: Your Herb Garden, by B.W.

Introductory Disclaimer: I am not a doctor. Use medicinal herbs under direction from your own doctor and with your own discretion. Always do your research before taking any medication, herbal or otherwise. Does the world as it sits right now have you feeling overwhelmed and more than a little nervous about the future? Maybe you’re prepping like crazy, putting back food and water. Maybe you’re rearranging your investments and starting some of the projects you’ve been wanting to do for years. In all of your preparation, have you made considerations for what you will do if modern medicine takes a …




What’s in the Rest of My Bags and Why – Part 2, by D.D. in Arizona

This is the conclusion of a two-part article. Part 1 was posted on August 30th. Main Compartment The part number of my bugout bag — a Direct Action Messenger Bag — is BG-MSGM-CD5. I like the new approach of these bags to line the inside with the loop part of Velcro® and then just stick everything inside at whatever angle and arrangement you prefer. I used three different methods to attach the gear: Vertx makes a thing named the MAK Band – very helpful for the pepper sprays and holding Glock magazines. Self-adhesive strips of hook material on the lighter …




What’s in the Rest of My Bags and Why – Part 1, by D.D. in Arizona

I suppose this is more of a continuation of the first article link that I submitted to SurvivalBlog and that was posted back in March of 2013: What’s In My 72 Hour Bag (and why). I was surprised to see over 400,000 downloads from my website and I got more than a few e-mailed comments. Some Background: In 2011, I started carrying a 5.11 satchel with a Glock inside since I obtained a CCW permit in Colorado. Over the years that messenger bag turned into an intermediate between my EDC key ring and my 72-hour bag. But recently, while in …




Prevail EMT Kit Pouch, by Pat Cascio

Back in another life, I worked as a Paramedic. This involved a number of different positions. As part of my training, I worked in a big city Emergency Room. I also worked for a doctor for a year, as his assistant. This was long before there was anything like a Physician’s Assistant (PA). I got a great education while working for the doctor – I assisted him in just about everything he did – including minor outpatient surgery, delivering babies, and everything you can possibly think of that took place in a medical practice. I also owned my own clinic …




Assembling Advanced Medical Cabinets, by K.B., M.D.

No doubt, we all have a medicine cabinet of some size. Lately, I reorganized and consolidated our medical supplies with the major assistance of my kind talented husband who built a set of floor-to-ceiling cabinets dedicated to that purpose even though he dislikes doing carpentry. (Thank you!) Because I am a retired and disabled physician, I obtain supplies to mainly care for those under our roof in a TEOTWAWKI situation. Of course, we all are very aware of recent supply shortages (masks, hand sanitizer, medications-both over the counter and prescription) but what about the possibility of a decline in the …




Medical Community Autocracy, by ToAndFro

I thought long and hard about whether to share this due to OPSEC, but felt it was important. We have been seeing the same GP for healthcare for 28+ years and he was just slightly older than us. In June of 2020 he announced his retirement due to his own health concerns and COVID. He had always been very down-to-earth, understanding, listened more than he spoke, understood people, non-political, etc. The kind of doctor you would want for a Physician. Luckily, his office partner was able to see us so we didn’t have to find new doctors. I had a …




Lifesaving Tourniquets, by A.P.

OBJECTIVE In this article, I will explain the life-saving benefits of the proper application of tourniquets, selection, placement.  I hope to clear up some myths about tourniquets, and explain the actions that need to happen after applying a tourniquet. Along the way, I will introduce some medical terminology to better communicate and to impress your friends. Anyone can apply a tourniquet. While you do not need any official or special medical certification or training, you do need to understand how to properly use one. This article, while informative, is no substitute for hands-on training and practice. A BRIEF BIOGRAPHY My …




Another Get Home Bag Approach – Part 2, by G.P.

(Continued from Part 1. This concludes the article.) Medical concerns Note: This is not actual medical advice, simply a description of military methods. I am not a medical professional and if I were, I’d still have no idea of your needs, conditions, capabilities, and allergies. I have a trauma kit, aka blowout kit, in my bag. The kind of situation that might leave you stranded far from home might also expose you to trauma, immediately or in the aftermath. Trauma is something unexpected. If you saw it coming, you’d most likely avoid it. This is a whole topic of its …




Another Get Home Bag Approach – Part 1, by G.P.

Three fine articles have gave been posted in SurvivalBlog lately on the subject of Get Home Bags. First, J.M. addressed the question of getting back home if stranded at a distance by using exact planning. Second, St. Funogas described a more general plan that focused on the basics of minimal equipment and keeping up calorie intake. Last, J. Smith advocated for good-quality clothing and equipment and aligning priorities with resources. J.M. approached the problem as an ultralight (UL) or super-ultralight (SUL) hiker. The problem set was narrowly defined: maximum distance, various possible routes and start points, range of weather conditions, …




Sanitation for Survivalists, by Tunnel Rabbit

This article is an introduction to hygiene and sanitation for families, small groups, and communities. During early wars, dysentery was by far the cause of most of the combat ineffectiveness in the field. It can debilitate armies. Second to dysentery, were trench foot and frostbite. Sanitation begins with personal hygiene, and is important regardless of group size. Individual habits contribute to the health of others. We do not need to be spreading disease among ourselves and becoming sick and inffective. The broader issue of sanitation must be addressed and practiced at the group level. Having lived in austere conditions for …




Your Red Bags: Stop The Bleed – Part 2, by Philip J. Goscienski, M.D.

(Continued from Part 1. This concludes the article.) Things to consider beyond bleeding No matter how good you are at stopping a hemorrhaging blood vessel, you or someone that you designate must call 9-1-1 right now! Don’t say “Somebody call 9-1-1!” Bob may think that John will call; John thinks that Bob is calling – and no one calls. Instead designate: “John, call 9-1-1!” If you are faced with more than one victim, which might occur in a motor vehicle accident, decide as quickly as you can where the worst bleeding is occurring – which person and which part of …




Your Red Bags: Stop The Bleed – Part 1, by Philip J. Goscienski, M.D.

When the shooting stops but the bleeding doesn’t, are you really prepared? Approximately 40,000 Americans die every year from injuries that result in severe bleeding, a condition that can drain life away in as little as four minutes. The massacre at Sandy Hook, Connecticut on December 14th, 2012, was a tipping point. In that dreadful event twenty students, all only six or seven years old, and six staff members were gunned down by Adam Lanza, who had earlier murdered his mother and subsequently took his own life. Shortly thereafter members of the American College of Surgeons, the Department of Defense, …