Letter Re: Leatherworking as a Post-TEOTWAWKI Occupation

Dear Jim, Basic leatherworking [suggested in the recent poll on potential TEOTWAWKI home businesses] is fairly easy, if time consuming. Shears, a punch and strong thread are all that’s needed. Fine work or more elaborate items than pouches, belts, hats and such take practice, but the leather can frequently be salvaged from mistakes and reused. I think the most important aspect of the skill for a TEOTWAWKI environment would be skinning, curing and tanning. Brain, urine, vegetable and oak tanning are time consuming (Everything about leather is), but books exist and functional (as opposed to pretty) leather isn’t too hard …




Poll Results: Best Occupations for Both Before and After TEOTWAWKI

In no particular order, the following are the first batch of responses to my poll question on the best occupations or home businesses for both before and after TEOTWAWKI: Locksmith/Home security systems installer/repairman — Beekeeping Small scale vegetable gardening. Growing herbs (medicinal) — 1) Electricity: a. Recharge batteries for folks, rebuild the bad batteries, and lots of folks don’t know squat about electricity for lighting, etc. Got several methods: Solar, miscellaneous generators powered by hand, animal, wind and even the old one lung gas engine with that darn heavy flywheel. b. Also use the above for communications when there aren’t …




Advantages of Owning a Small Sawmill for Homestead and Retreat Building, by Tennessee Hillbilly

There are many ways to be prepared for whatever the future may hold and no feasible way to be prepared for every scenario. While “Beans, Bullets and Band-Aids” should be given the top priority, there are many situations where a small band saw mill fits the bill. In the current situation, it’s a cheap source of lumber for building projects. On a homestead/retreat there is always a need for lumber. Having selected a remote area for security reasons, by default, places an individual a long way from any supplies, but usually an abundance of trees are available. There have been …




Selecting Barter Goods, by Warhawke

In a post-TEOTWAWKI world just about everyone realizes that paper money will become useless (unless you can get enough to use as insulation for your house) and there has been much discussion of gold, silver and other items for barter in these pages. I have devoted a great deal of thought to this subject and I would like to share a few of my ideas on the subject with you. I’m going to try to be fairly short on details here in order to keep the length of the article manageable. Keep in mind that what I am discussing here …




Distance Learning College Teaching–A “Remote” Living Possibility?

Jim- Those with an advanced degree (at least a Master’s) plus experience in education, business, government may be qualified to teach for the U of Phoenix in their online program. Before I moved to Hawaii, I taught for them for several years, the last two in the online program. The pay is generous (up to and perhaps over $1,200) for a 5-week course. U of P. is the largest (by student numbers) university in the US–it is a quality program and if you look into it you will be impressed. Here’s the part I thought would intrigue you: you physically …




Note From #1 Son:

Great news! The Vermont NAIS equivalent program has been stopped. Premises registration is no longer mandatory in Vermont. Keep in mind, however, that the National Animal Identification System is still scheduled to become mandatory. Write your congressmen now! There are frequent updates on NAIS at NoNAIS.org. For general background, see our NAIS page.




Letter Re: Brass Recycling

Jim, Just a note regarding Bill K.’s fired cartridge brass recycling idea to raise extra cash – it is a good money making idea with the continuing rise in the price of copper and other metals – our gun club here in North Carolina paid all its property taxes last year on the recycling of fired brass left after shooting events. The club insists that if the shooters don’t wish to take their fired brass home, they spend a few minutes between relays when the line is clear to police up brass and put them into specially marked/painted ‘brass buckets’. …




Letter Re: Survival Dollars, by Wolverine

Jim, I would like you to consider adding additional ways to earn extra “Survival Income” to Wolverine post on Survival Dollars. One, is an addition to his collecting and selling scrap metal. I take a five gallon bucket with me to the outdoor range in the Sumter National Forest and collect all the brass I can between shooting sessions. The best time is Sunday afternoon, to get all the weekend shooters left. In 4-5 weekends I filled a five gallon bucket and maybe 1/3 of another and made $87. The other weekend income job I have is putting out and …




Survival Dollars, by Wolverine

Over the years I have spent a fair amount of time trying to figure out various ways to earn extra money to purchase the needed survival items I wanted without causing a fight with my spouse. I feel fortunate to have found several that work well for me, and may work for you as well. Ground rules for myself were that working a part time job was out. I hated working my normal 40 hour week and being committed to having to be at a certain spot at a certain time five or six days a week. Over the years …




Poll Results: The Best Jobs for a Deep Recession or Economic Depression?

Here the reader responses that we have received thusfar on our poll: “The Best Jobs for a Deep Recession or Economic Depression”: “Tenured college or university professor.” “Locksmith. When the economy is good people need to protect their new ‘stuff’ and when the economy is bad people need to protect their old ‘stuff’. Crime does pay if you ar a locksmith. For twenty three years through good economic times and bad I always had work.” “I suggest public accounting. Why? The flurry of bankruptcies that will ensue. Bankruptcy work is very profitable for accountants. Also, if the last depression was …







Letter from “RBS” Re: Supporting SurvivalBlog and Developing a Second Stream of Income

For those of you that have come to find SurvivalBlog.Com a daily read and would also find the Internet just not as fun a place without it, might I suggest an easy way to generate the requested donation of $36 per year (or just 10 cents a day) to keep it going strong. Sell something on eBay or other commerce site (there are plenty!) [and take $36.50 of the proceeds] and send it to JWR. It’s an easy and effective way of killing several “birds” with one stone. First, you will be supporting your favorite web site. Second, the money …




Letter Re: Making a Living in The Country

James, Going back to the subject of, “Well now I live in the middle of nowhere, how do I make a living?” The middle of nowhere is surrounded by farms, small towns and older townsfolk. What does this mean? Antiques! Old store signs, auto parts signs, gas pumps, oil can racks and tools will bring in a nice price from eBay or other auction houses. Just think of the estate sales or farm sales! Generations of old furniture and other household goods! Yes it’s sad to watch our farms and farmers die off (I’ve read that the average age of …




Letter From Matt Bracken Re: A Home-Based Business–Your Ticket to The Boonies

Jim, Here is another terrific home business idea which “sells itself,” requires only a minimal investment, has a high profit margin, and can be done in one’s spare time. Install front door peep-holes. A number of years back I was visiting in a large townhouse complex where my wife used to live, and a gentleman rang the doorbell. Upon opening the door, I met the man holding a peephole in his hand. He almost didn’t need to say a word. It literally needed no sales pitch, it “sold itself.” He had the tools etc to do it on the spot. …




Three Letters Re: A Home-Based Business–Your Ticket to The Boonies

Jim: I thought the point was to have a home-based business that could survive in the boonies…?   I don’t see much need for a locksmith, gunsmith, or alarm installer in the boonies where most structures are on huge acres of land with fences and who knows how many dogs on the property, let alone a cantankerous old coot with a heavily worn double-barrel shotgun… <grin>   Even repairs are pushing it when neighbors may be a mile or more away… that is a SMALL customer base.   How many guns near you in the boonies that need custom gunsmithing? …