David in Israel Re: Buckshot’s Survival Attitude Versus the “Commando” Survival Attitude

James: Just a quick response as I expect such responses after the pro .30-30 posts. 1- Outfit with a basic defensive firearm .30-30, SKS, 12 gauge, etc. 2- Take care of other more important survival purchases 3- When your budget allows upgrade to better defensive weapons 4- Don’t let ownership of exotic/military utility weapons make you believe you are a SEAL (the point of the .30-30 post) Unless defense is the most pressing danger, then don’t sink your whole survival budget into guns if you can already accomplish that mission with existing arms. Most of us enjoy firearms and we are always tempted to justify a new firearm upgrade instead of the boring grain mill and basic shelter type stuff. – David

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Letter From Buckshot Re: Housing Bubble Schizophrenia

Hi Jim, I was over on Realtor.com and checking on housing prices for the bubble. On the right hand side was books advertisements. The first one listed was Cash in on the Coming Real Estate Crash, the second book was Learn How to Profit from Foreclosures Without Risking Your Savings! the books are from Wiley real estate.   Talk about Wiley Coyote stepping off the cliff on part of the page they are trying to sell houses and the other part they are saying Real Estate is going to crash. Only in America. Here’s the link to Wiley

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Letter Re: Firearms Training and Subsequent Practice

Jim: Reading the letter from the gentleman who mentioned on all the western states instruction opportunities compared to the eastern ones, I noticed my all-time favorite instructor was not mentioned: Pat Goodale, of Practical Firearms Training. His primary range is located in West Virginia, and I wholeheartedly recommend his courses. Last year I decided I was slacking off with my practice and signed up for a full summer of his courses (he also owns a company in Montana, so there are courses offered here as well). I took Defensive Handgun I, II, and III, Precision Rifle, Tactical Rifle, and will be taking Defensive Shotgun this year. His courses run about $150 per day, are limited in class size, and are an incredible value. I’ve been to Front Sight, and while it was good training, I think it was nowhere near as fantastic as what I’ve learned from Pat. In the handgun courses we expended 500 rounds per day – same for tactical rifle. It’s fast-paced training, and well worth anyone’s time to take the trip to Alderson, WV or Billings, MT for the course. If you can get 8-10 of your friends to pitch in, Pat will even come to … Continue reading

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Odds ‘n Sods:

Trading on the new Russian RTS oil and gold bourse begins June 8th. The transactions will be denominated in Euros. Sound familiar? This does not bode well for the U.S. Dollar.    o o o The US DoD Upgrades its Assessment of the Chinese Military Threat.    o o o Here in the U.S., the unsold house inventory backlog jumped to 565,000 in April. The housing bubble has popped. There are no more bidding wars for houses. Now its price cut after price cut. In the coastal markets, I anticipate a race to the bottom, most likely starting in September of Aught Six.    o o o The CDC is forming a Morgellon skin disease task force.    o o o I was just doing a search for some genealogy materials on the Rawles surname on eBay. I had to laugh when I found a current auction for a copy of my novel “Patriots” . The following was included in the description: “THIS COPY IS VERY WELL USED AS IT IS UNDERLINED, BUT STILL VERY READABLE, IT SURVIVED TWO WINTERS IN THE YAAK RIVER AREA OF MONTANA. TURNED CORNERS,WATER, BOOZE OR COFFEE STAINS.”

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Jim’s Quote of the Day:

Jake: What’s this? Elwood: What? Jake: This car. This stupid car. Where’s the Cadillac? The Caddy? Where’s the Caddy? Elwood: The what? Jake: The Cadillac we used to have. The Blues Mobile! Elwood: I traded it. Jake: You traded the Blues Mobile for this? Elwood: No. For a microphone. Jake: A microphone? Okay I can see that. Well, what the h**l is this? Elwood: This was a bargain. I picked it up at the Mount Prospect City Police auction last spring. It’s an old Mount Prospect Police Car. They were practically giving them away. Jake: Well, thank you pal. The day I get out of prison, my own brother picks me up in a police car. Elwood: You don’t like it? Jake: No, I don’t like it. [Elwood floors the gas pedal and jumps over an opening drawbridge] Jake: Car’s got a lot of pickup. Elwood: It’s got a cop motor, a 440 cubic inch plant, it’s got cop tires, cop suspension, cop shocks. It’s a model made before catalytic converters so it’ll run good on regular gas. What do you say, is it the new Bluesmobile or what? Jake: Fix the cigarette lighter. – Dan Ackroyd and John Belushi … Continue reading

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Note from JWR:

Today we present another article for Round 4 of the SurvivalBlog non-fiction writing contest. The writer of the best non-fiction article will win a four day “gray” transferable Front Sight course certificate. (Worth up up to $2,000!) Round 5 of the contest begins on June 1st.

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Using Rechargeable Batteries, by Northwest Huey

There have been a number of comments on SurvivalBlog about rechargeable batteries. The majority of these expressed the feeling that rechargeable batteries were expensive and ineffective for a long term storage plan. Before anyone gives up on rechargeable batteries I would like to share a plan that has proven effective for my family. One day I sat down and assessed my family’s state of preparedness. Like many others, we needed more beans, bullets and band-aids. Turns out, we also needed more batteries. Before I started buying batteries, I tried to think of creative ways to minimize the number of batteries I would need. The first thing I decided to do was to go to low drain and no drain devices when possible. For example, I picked up an LED conversion for my Mini Maglite that more than triples the run time of my flashlight. [JWR Adds: Such as one of these.] So now, I get the runtime from two batteries that used to require six batteries. An example of a no drain device is the Swiss windup alarm clock that I purchased to replace my battery powered clock. Obviously these steps only lessened my dependence but I still needed a … Continue reading

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Letter Re: Growing Dwarf Fruit Trees Indoors?

Dear Jim: I was wondering if any green thumbs out there have actually grown dwarf fruit trees indoors? Regards, – Rourke The Memsahib Replies: Yes, fruit trees can be grown indoors but each flower must be hand pollinated unless you have a house full of bees, butterflies, and/or flies. That means for each piece of fruit that you hope to produce, you must transfer pollen from one flower to another. Fruit will not develop unless the male pollen enters the female ovum. This can be done with the tip of a feather. If you have only room for one tree, be sure it is “self pollinating”. Self pollinating means that your tree will bear both male and female flowers. In nature trees are not self pollinating and you need two trees of each. Two cherries, two apples, two lemons and so forth. The crop yield-versus-labor ratio is fairly small for most dwarf varieties. My grandparents have grown dwarf fruit trees, as well as regular fruit trees, for the last thirty years under optimal California weather. And I have to say it seems like grandma and grandpa are always babying and fussing over the dwarf trees. They seem much more susceptible … Continue reading

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From The Memsahib: Lessons Learned from The Black Death

The following are some interesting quotes that I found when doing some of genealogy research. (One of my ancestors was a Norseman who died of the plague in Avignon in 1349.) In Parma, Italy, the poet Petrarch wrote to his brother: When has any such thing been even heard or seen; in what annals has it ever been read that houses were left vacant, cities deserted, the country neglected, the fields too small for the dead and a fearful and universal solitude over the whole earth?… Oh happy people of the future, who have not known these miseries and perchance will class our testimony with the fables. An account by Marchionne, written from Florence: Such was the terror this caused that seeing it take hold in a household, as soon as it started, nobody remained: everybody abandoned the dwelling in fear, and fled to another; some fled into the city and others into the countryside. No doctors were to be found, because they were dying like everybody else… Sons abandoned fathers, husbands wives, wives husbands, one brother the other, one sister the other. … The foodstuffs suitable for the sick, cakes and sugar, reached outrageous prices. A pound of sugar … Continue reading

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Letter Re: Request for Advice on Dog Breeds

Hi, Jim. I wanted to reply to the thread about Advice on Dog Breeds. Here is my main point:  Dogs are are like guns, in that there is no one true “all purpose” dog breed.   The very qualities that make a dog a good herding dog will make for a poor protection dog.  Sometimes even, the qualities that make for a good watch dog will make for a poor guard dog.  (A watch dog’s purpose is to alert you to a potential intruder.  A guard dog’s purpose is to hold, bite and stop and intruder.)   As the former owner of both South Bay K-9 Academy for seven years, which was the #1 dog training company in Los Angeles, and the current editor of Dogproblems.com, I have a lot of experience in this field and have noted that– even within the professional sector– macho attitude often rules over pragmatic trial by fire.  I can go into more detail on how to select a good dog, depending on the job you’re looking for him to do, but for now let me just point out that the more realistic and specific you can be about the job you seek your dog to do, the … Continue reading

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