Preparedness Notes for Saturday — March 21, 2020

March 21st, 1778:  Just three days after Hessian mercenary forces assaulted the local New Jersey militia at Quinton’s Bridge, the same contingent surprised the colonial militia at Hancock’s Bridge five miles from Salem. In what became known as the Massacre at Hancock’s Bridge, at least 20 members of the militia lost their lives, some after attempting to surrender. The Loyalists reputedly exclaimed “Spare no one! Give no quarter!” as they stormed the occupied house. Judge Hancock and his brother (both Loyalists) were bayoneted in the melee by the attackers even though they were both staunch supporters of the crown and were themselves non-violent Quakers.

Reader G.A. wrote to mention that readers might want to read her article: Setting Up A Sick Room in Your Home, by G.A. (RN). That was the First Prize winner, back in Round 51 of the writing contest.

Anyone who has been exiled to home by their employer might want to share their expertise and write a SurvivalBlog feature article. That sure beats binge-watching some television series on Netflix. Just e-mail us your entry. Remember: Non-fiction only, with a 1,500 word minimum.

SurvivalBlog Writing Contest

Today we present another entry for Round 87 of the SurvivalBlog non-fiction writing contest. The prizes for this round include:

First Prize:

  1. A gift certificate from Quantum Harvest LLC (up to a $2,200 value) good for 12% off the purchase of any of their sun-tracking models, and 10% off the purchase price of any of their other models.
  2. A Gunsite Academy Three Day Course Certificate. This can be used for any one, two, or three day course (a $1,095 value),
  3. A course certificate from onPoint Tactical for the prize winner’s choice of three-day civilian courses, excluding those restricted for military or government teams. Three day onPoint courses normally cost $795,
  4. DRD Tactical is providing a 5.56 NATO QD Billet upper. These have hammer forged, chrome-lined barrels and a hard case, to go with your own AR lower. It will allow any standard AR-type rifle to have a quick change barrel. This can be assembled in less than one minute without the use of any tools. It also provides a compact carry capability in a hard case or in 3-day pack (an $1,100 value),
  5. Two cases of Mountain House freeze-dried assorted entrees in #10 cans, courtesy of Ready Made Resources (a $350 value),
  6. A $250 gift certificate good for any product from Sunflower Ammo,
  7. American Gunsmithing Institute (AGI) is providing a $300 certificate good towards any of their DVD training courses.

Second Prize:

  1. A Front Sight Lifetime Diamond Membership, providing lifetime free training at any Front Sight Nevada course, with no limit on repeating classes. This prize is courtesy of a SurvivalBlog reader who prefers to be anonymous.
  2. A Glock form factor SIRT laser training pistol and a SIRT AR-15/M4 Laser Training Bolt, courtesy of Next Level Training, which have a combined retail value of $589,
  3. A $300 purchase credit for any of the products from EMPShield.com
  4. A Three-Day Deluxe Emergency Kit from Emergency Essentials (a $190 value),
  5. Two 1,000-foot spools of full mil-spec U.S.-made 750 paracord (in-stock colors only) from www.TOUGHGRID.com (a $240 value).
  6. An assortment of products along with a one hour consultation on health and wellness from Pruitt’s Tree Resin (a $265 value).

Third Prize:

  1. Three sets each of made-in-USA regular and wide-mouth reusable canning lids. (This is a total of 300 lids and 600 gaskets.) This prize is courtesy of Harvest Guard (a $270 value)
  2. A Royal Berkey water filter, courtesy of Directive 21 (a $275 value),
  3. Naturally Cozy is donating a “Prepper Pack” Menstrual Kit.  This kit contains 18 pads and it comes vacuum sealed for long term storage or slips easily into a bugout bag.  The value of this kit is $220.
  4. Two Super Survival Pack seed collections, a $150 value, courtesy of Seed for Security, LLC,
  5. A transferable $100 purchase credit from Elk Creek Company, toward the purchase of any pre-1899 antique gun. There is no paperwork required for delivery of pre-1899 guns into most states, making them the last bastion of firearms purchasing privacy!

Round 87 ends on March 31st, so get busy writing and e-mail us your entry. Remember that there is a 1,500-word minimum, and that articles on practical “how to” skills for survival have an advantage in the judging.




9 Comments

  1. I just wanted to give all of you an update on my husband and his surgery. Then I’d like to add some of the things I saw and heard at Emory University Hospital while I was there yesterday and today.
    First, my husband’s surgery went well. It was very long but we were expecting that – 6 hrs plus about 2 hrs in PACU before I was able to see him. The surgeon said the margins were clear so that means he was able to get all the cancer in the colon. The adjacent lymph nodes were also removed and have been sent to pathology. If clear, nothing else is needed but surveillance but if not, then chemotherapy will be necessary. Today my husband was up and walking around, he has no pain (except shoulder pain from gas used for the laparoscopy), he is eating and if all goes well may be coming home tomorrow. He did have premature atrial contractions (PAC) post operatively possibly due to dehydration (he did do 2 bowel preps in one week). He’s on a cardiac monitor and taking magnesium. Hopefully there will be no others symptoms or problems.
    I want to thank all of you for your prayers, kind words and encouragement. God has this! I’m so glad we are brothers and sisters in Christ.

    Secondly, some of the things I heard and saw.
    The hospital had staff located at all the entrances checking people for temperatures, recent international travel, coughs and association with anyone that has Covid – 19.

    Also, only one visitor was allowed in and they did check this. Unknown to us, a friend of my husband’s from high school was with another patient (he was their pastor) in the surgery waiting room and when he saw us come in he came over to say hello. The man at the admissions desk said one of us (me or the friend) would have to leave as there was only one visitor per patient allowed. We let him know he was with another patient so all was good.

    In preop, the nurse there said they weren’t allowed to wear masks (both myself and my husband were wearing masks) because administration said it would frighten patients if they wore them. She wasn’t happy I could tell.

    There weren’t very many surgery cases and lots of help from other nurses.

    Today the nurse taking care of my husband said my husband told her I was a retired nurse and asked me if I had ever experienced anything like this before. I said just HIV back when I was doing clinicals in nursing school but it wasn’t as bad as this. She said they were all afraid (the nurses) and the hospital policy wouldn’t allow them to wear masks. I said it’s because they don’t have enough and she said “exactly!” She said she had heard rumors and didn’t know if they were true, that they weren’t going to be allowed to leave. I asked if nurses were calling out, she said it was hard to tell because there were so few patients that they have been sending nurses home, they sent three home this morning. She said that wasn’t good either because if they didn’t have PTO it was unpaid. She said it was hard to know what was going to happen because things changed daily. She said they didn’t have the supplies they needed to care for patients or protect themselves.
    While I was there the floor secretary came around to each room to let visitors know that the hospital was “locking down” Sunday (until further notice) and visitors wouldn’t be allowed in at all.
    There are some other things I saw and heard that have me very concerned.

    On my way home this afternoon and also this morning going to the hospital, I noticed more traffic than there was yesterday on the ride in for the surgery. Many motor homes, towed boats, off road vehicles, kayaks and canoes. All heading to North Georgia counties that currently have no Covi-19 cases. I passed a rest area that is normally empty, crowded with families. It was so bizarre it looks like everyone in metro Atlanta is heading for the mountains. I almost wish for more rain to keep everyone away. I can’t wait until my husband is home and we can stay locked down. I think we’re heading into an extremely difficult time. Hopefully my husband won’t have any complications because there truly may not be any help for him.

    Stay safe, stay home. God bless you and keep you.

    1. Thank You CD, for the update.

      I am praying that your husband will not have any complications and that He will recover super fast so you may get out of there ASAP.

      Blessings,

      Lily

    2. CD, Thank you for letting us know the good news. Your husbands surgery was on my mind all yesterday, not knowing what the start time was. Many prayers have been said for you both. Again, this morning, before I even opened my eyes in bed, the Lord had me praying for him. I shake my head in awe it amazes me so. I was pondering my feelings, and because I see how much the Lord loves you both, I realized it makes me feel loved more by Him too. Imo, we can never feel loved too much. I am so touched by His care for you, a tear has rolled down my cheek as I’m typing. Our Heavenly Father is so merciful. It is incredible to me your husband is virtually pain free, eating and walking… Also, praising God for “clear edges,” and asking for clean nodes. I’m so excited for you both. Obviously, God has work for you both to do…

      Thank you for the community update as well. Blessings in abundance be yours.

    3. CD… praise God for the good news you are able to share regarding your husband’s surgery… I will be praying for continued healing from The Great Physician /Our FATHER who is in heaven… Thank you Lord for what You are doing in this family…God bless you , CD

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