Equestrian Survival For Bugging Out, Recon, Rescue, Projection of Force, or Hunting- Part 3, by R.M.

It also pays to have practiced riding bare back. If you have to run, you may not have time to saddle up and will be fortunate enough to grab your rig. It’s like riding at a trot without posting. You will sit full on the back where the saddle would be, back straight up, allowing the body to become one with the horse’s up and down motion. Moving to the canter or full gallop is easier. Your body must be fluid with the horse. Running away, then collecting yourself, and returning on foot to take back gear might work and might save your animal. An undefendable situation requires retreat, even if you have to leave gear behind. You might think that, if you have a gun, none of those things matter. First, let me say that we have a duty to preserve God’s creation. In most cases that includes all the people you come in contact with. We should not be planning the demise of others, even if attacked; we should make the greatest effort to do no harm, but some people need to be stopped. We often must forgive them for they know not what they do, especially if … Continue reading

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Equestrian Survival For Bugging Out, Recon, Rescue, Projection of Force, or Hunting- Part 2, by R.M.

Figure Out How Much Weight Your Horse Can Handle If things head south, and you think you might have to use your horse under stress at some point in the near future, keep his weight right and work his chest. A firm horse is one you can rely upon. Using a soft horse for a strenuous endeavor is not fair to the horse and is a safety hazard to you. Every horse is different. A horse with bad conformation (bone structure) can’t have much expected of him; a swayback isn’t a long distance choice. You have to have a good idea of how they function/feel best. Most preferable is a horse who can’t wait to go for a ride. Once you’ve developed an honest assessment of what you and your horse are capable of, it’s time to figure out how much weight the horse can handle. A day trip away from home and a day back should enable you to figure out what is fair for your horse. Obviously, you should already know your horse. If you are not truly in touch with what your animal can do, don’t assume anything. Man, know thy horse! You can build most average … Continue reading

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Equestrian Survival For Bugging Out, Recon, Rescue, Projection of Force, or Hunting- Part 1, by R.M.

Assess Your Horse’s Capabilities and Temperament We all love to think of our horses as part of the family. Some might love their horses. Let me begin by saying that before you do an overnight or longer trip away from all the comforts of home, you need to honestly assess your horse’s capabilities and temperament. Temperament is key here. I am careful to choose the horse for the job. I prefer traveling far with my dog as well. He is a great scout, level headed, and loves to ride. He often hunts for himself, but I always bring food for him. Mind you, once horse and dog are out for four or five hours, their temperament smooths. I have made my horse aware of the terrain. He can surf down a steep mountain trail with loose scree or find his way home five hours out, through thick forest on his own, while I relax in the saddle. Trained in the Colorado and California mountains and holding his own in the hunt lands of Virginia, he can practically walk over a four foot fence, loves the hunt, stays placidly tied at the range, and he’s a good old boy, who loves … Continue reading

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Surviving Custer, by R.S.

Let’s be honest, how many of you ever expect to find yourself in a survival situation? You’ve probably day dreamed about it, wondering how you’d fare. The fact is, we don’t walk out the door in the morning expecting to find ourselves in a predicament. I certainly never expected to find myself in such a “survival” situation on a summer day in South Dakota’s Custer State Park. Yet, there I was facing such a situation just last summer. We had finally taken our long-awaited family vacation “out West”. We live in the suburbs outside a large Midwestern city. So the lure of loading up the RV and heading west on an adventure had been alive and well with us for some time. As any good tourist would, we planned the route that would take us through the Badlands and eventually to Mt. Rushmore. What could be more American, right? Having grown up in Boy Scouts, being prepared is practically part of my DNA. In the last few years, I’ve ramped things up a bit and have been more diligent about keeping a go-bag in my car along with a variety of other things that would be useful in a pinch. … Continue reading

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Total City WTSHTF Survival- Part 2, by NDT

Public Transportation Learn how public transportation works in your area and utilize it, as it could be an asset one day. Also, learn about anything that is public, from restrooms and shelters to tornado shelters. Timing could be an issue, and it could become the closest shelter for a variety of situations. Parks also have water supplies. Know where the water fill ups are. I personally know of some local spots that have hand pumps, which while it is not a secret, few people will think of immediately during a loss of utilities. Memberships Having a few memberships can be a huge asset should you become displaced. The YMCA, for instance, has showers you could use without any trouble simply by having an affordable membership. You could also utilize that membership to enhance your strength. A library membership can get you easy access to shelter and information. A self-storage unit can be utilized as a cache, although it’s expensive. Medical Basic first aid is a must, and in the city we should be more cognizant of airborne threats. Considering the case example of the Bhopal disaster and also addressing tear, chlorine, mustard, nerve gas, and sternutators, here are some guidelines … Continue reading

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Total City WTSHTF Survival- Part 1, by NDT

I’ve been a SurvivalBlog reader for years and grew up prepping. My parents were preppers in the 90’s, so I’ve been through the full spectrum. I love the articles and especially all the news to be found on SurvivalBlog. I appreciate the hard work all the authors have put into their articles over the years and recognize that most individual skills and ideas have been put to ink. I’m going to attempt the 10,000-aerial view in this approach to city survival. My military background taught me to do a risk assessment for everything, and I practice this today. The million-dollar question is, “What do I need to prepare for?”. We cannot predict the future, but we can consider the past and see trends and patterns and learn from those. Consider this. Create a Risk Assessment The earth has been hit with many asteroids over its existence, and per a map that I found the location seems random. The frequency of these impacts is rare and typically minor. Looking at a risk assessment matrix regarding risk with earth space impacts, I conclude that it is an “improbable” event with “catastrophic” to “negligible” severity. The threats seen from an earth space impact … Continue reading

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Letter Re: Call Me 4-Eyes

Hugh, Last week a letter titled Call Me 4-Eyes caught my attention. I agree 100% with his suggestions. As a retired Optometrist of 40+ years experience with military and civilian practice, I am concerned for contact wearers post SHTF. The very instant sanitation and personal hygiene are compromised, you should discontinue wearing contacts! Even today, most eye care providers will tell you they see several contact lens complications per week. An eye infection or corneal ulcer can be treated with good results in today’s world. When eye care is not available, a simple infection or corneal ulcer could result in loss of sight. With many of the super bugs we now experience, it could be a life threatening event. Each contact lens wearer should have multiple pairs of glasses or consider having corrective eye surgery to restore vision. Stockpiling contacts and solutions is not the best idea. Simply washing your hands in contaminated water could cause viral, bacterial, or protozoan infections if you touch the contacts. Wearing contacts post SHTF is not the prudent thing to do. – Phoroptor

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Letter Re: Airport BOB

HJL, I have traveled extensively for the last 30 years and carry these items in addition to what you listed: Life straw. Clean water will be essential if you are stuck or have to walk home. Israeli battle dressing. It could be essential to saving yourself or someone else. Tourniquet: Can save yourself or someone else. Tactical pen. Mix it in with other pens in brief case. It’s not much but better than nothing on the airplane. Briefcase that converts to back pack. Brief cases are less conspicuous in the board room. Last year, I personally saw five young Middle Eastern men rush the gate agent at LAX to board in front of first class. The lone agent was so startled that they let them on. They were in the rear of the plane. Several frequent flyers and I developed a plan to eliminate the threat. They never moved during the flight to DFW. They would not have succeeded in taking over our flight. The danger is real, and we must stay ever vigilant. – J.H.

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JWR’s Recommendations of the Week:

Books: The Black Arrow: A Tale of the Resistance by Vin Suprynowicz All New Square Foot Gardening, by Mel Bartholomew Movies: Duck Soup The Maltese Falcon Television: Jericho Firefly Music: The 50 Greatest Pieces of Classical Music Rags to Riches the Essential Hits [of Scott Joplin] Instructional Videos: AR-15 Upgrades Overview (from IV8888) Art Of The Tactical Carbine by Chris Costa Podcasts: The Adventure Sports Podcast Wranglerstar: AMAZING Room Transformation Gear: SOG Traction EDC Pocketknife (Under $15!) Harris Bipod Model 1A2 (Adjustable 6” to 9”) Midland Model 75-822 40 Channel CB Handheld Radio

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Letter Re: Airport BOB

HJL, I’ve traveled for my company for the past 20 years, and 98% of what T.H. listed is what I had in my travel bag. Note it is what I “had”, as in past tense. I finally got out of the airports and traveling all over the country in 2015. There is the possibility of an odd trip or two, so I still have my carry-on bag handy at work. I find that I occasionally rob it from time to time. One thing T.H. listed that I never had was a whistle, and I feel that is a good idea. I found that the items changed over time especially after 9/11. Once, when stranded in Minneapolis, MN, I was able to contact a friend who lived there and spent the night in her basement. My missing item in the bag was a toothbrush, so the next morning as her husband drove me back to the airport we stopped off at a drug store and added a travel brush and paste to my bag. Another couple of items I always keep in my bag is a small compact umbrella and a light compressible rain coat. I’ve left the sunny south, where … Continue reading

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Airport BOB, by T.H.

I agree that flying is a huge loss of rights, but I can’t afford not to fly.  I’m a college student getting ready to graduate, so I’m busy trying to find a job.  For an interview, I was flown to Dallas the same day they were setting records for snowfall.  As my flight had a connecting leg, home/Denver/Dallas, there was a distinct possibility of getting stuck in Denver and not being able to get to my interview hotel.  These flights were a great and so far safe/easy dry run.  All of this led me to really think about what would I need if something were to happen.  First, I have to define something happening:  I define something happening as a delayed or canceled flight, think 9/11, DC blizzards, Snowmageddon, et cetera, not necessarily a collapse but more of a large inconvenience.  I think that things will degrade worse before a collapse;  a cautious and minimal flying approach will continue to be employed.  If you think that a collapse will happen during your trip, then I wouldn’t travel.  That must be your informed, calculated call as you would be at a serious disadvantage. Making a BOB for the airport has some very non-beneficial considerations … Continue reading

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Letter Re: Don’t Call Me 4 Eyes

Hi, Your readers who need glasses may want to consider learning how to order glasses at www.zennioptical.com. I first learned of them from an article in The Wall Street Journal a number of years ago. They are reputable, and the waiting period to receive your glasses is about the same as that at retail stores. I typically obtain glasses for about one-third of the cost at retail eye glass stores, and at that price you can afford the spares you want. – A.K.

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