Preparing for a Flood– Part 2, by S.G.

Flood

Yesterday, as we look at preparing for a flood, we started discussing risk response strategies for floods. Today, we pick up on the fourth risk response strategy.

Strategy 4: Mitigate.

Mitigation is when you make deliberate actions to reduce the severity or likeliness of an uncertain event. We are going to spend a lot of time here, in four sections. These will focus on what to do in four timeframe scenarios.

Scenario 1- A flood may happen sometime.

The best time to prepare for a flood or any emergency is well before it happens.

Most people, when it comes to flooding, are primarily worried about protecting their property. In my opinion, this is looking at the situation backwards. Your property is there to protect you, not for you to protect it. So any modifications or preparations you do to your property are for the benefit of your safety, not its. As … Continue reading



Letter Re: The Practical Application of Tactical Gear, Load and Weight Considerations

Tactical Gear

Hugh,

I’ve been reading the MAX V articles about practical application of tactical gear, et cetera. This spurred me to add my .02 cents. During a 2014 deployment to Kandahar with the Air Force Reserve, I had an ankle injury that wasn’t serious enough to send me home but serious enough to slow me down for my entire tour. I had brought with me a Tactical Tailor H-harness and belt set, which I set up to wear under my armor. (Once the armor was on, I never felt it.) I kept one magazine pouch and a small admin pouch, used for power bars and band-ades, on the armor. Everything else was on the H-harness/belt.

Loading up the carrier with ammo pouches and extra crap looked high-speed for the younger troops, but I felt was additional weight to try to get on and off in a hurry. Also, … Continue reading



Guest Article: The Practical Application of Tactical Gear, Load and Weight Considerations- Part 2, by Max

Tactical Gear

The intent of this continued post is to tie in the related, practical application concepts of tactical gear, fitness, teamwork, logistics, and tactical loading, in order to present a realistic and logical way to approach the subject. There are a number of related factors at play here. Part 1 covered the mission, logistics, tactical load, physical conditioning, transport, and ballistic plates along with a note urging people to avoid heavy steel plates.

Team

In order to be able to conduct any sort of patrolling/security operation, you are going to need a team. This means numbers of trained personnel. You cannot have that QRF if you do not have the trained bodies to man the operations center and the QRF team, while also running a security rotation on your home base. Thus, it goes without saying that you need trained people, in sufficient numbers, to provide an effective tactical team.

Combat … Continue reading



Guest Article: The Practical Application of Tactical Gear, Load and Weight Considerations- Part 1, by Max

Tactical Gear

The intent of this post is to tie in the related, practical application concepts of tactical gear, fitness, teamwork, logistics, and tactical loading, in order to present a realistic and logical way to approach the subject. There are a number of related factors at play here.

Mission

We often utilize the military terminology of “METT-TC” in order to analyze our mission and thus apply it to the gear that we may carry. Factors such as weather, duration, and the specific mission that you are conducting play into considerations of what to carry. We must be realistic in what we plan and train for now, and thus pack for. Base it around what we think we realistically might be doing in a collapse situation. I put it to you that most people will be engaged in local defense and security patrolling. They may also deal with presence/ground domination activity (GDA). People will … Continue reading



Letter Re: Night Vision Gear and Infrared

Night Vision Gear

Hugh,

I’ve read JWR’s books and have been reading your site for a year now. I am a big fan. However, I’ve seen little or no verbiage on where to buy reasonably priced NVG or IR. Obviously your books and those of other good writers, like Joe Nobody, talk constantly about using them, and yet, it seems none are priced less than $1500. Any info would be appreciated. Thanks in advance. – J

HJL’s Comment:

As an entry level device, you can get a first generation device (usually Russian made) at nearly any sporting goods store that carries hunting/camping equipment for as low as $300. While these devices are okay for basic use, they have limited range and limited resolution. Unless they have been autogated (shuts off temporarily when bright lights are sensed) they can be damaged in normal light. They can also go completely white (well, really green) ruining … Continue reading



USMC Mountain Survival Course- Part 5, by E.T.

USMC Mountain Survival Course

Casualty Exercise

A few hours later, after dawn, we began our death march back to the USMC Mountain Survival Course base. To add excitement to our return, the instructors gave us several “casualties” that had to be carried out. We cut poles and ran them through our buttoned blouse sleeves to make stretchers. We soon realized that even with the casualty holding on, they would need to be tied onto the litter. As we carried it over rocks and up and down inclines, they would slide around and fall out. We almost made them into a real casualty several times.

This was extremely draining, but it was uplifting to know we were on the home stretch. At this point we were all emaciated and filthy. The hump back seemed to take forever. We moved continuously, passing the casualty from group to group of six people. As one group passed the … Continue reading



USMC Mountain Survival Course- Part 4, by E.T.

USMC Mountain Survival Course

Phase 3 – Group Survival (continued)

Relocation and Warmth

We had been in the field on our USMC Mountain Survival Course for four days in Phase 1 and five days for Phase 2. Phase 3 was just beginning. We had taken in roughly 1500 calories over nine days. After everyone had arrived from our isolation locations, the group went for a hump. We moved about five klicks up and down a couple of mountains and posed at the top in some snow for a couple group pictures. Then we humped back down into a large, mostly barren valley, which had a grassed stream running through the center about 4-5 feet across.

We arrived around afternoon and dropped our packs and gear in formation, except our personal survival kits and knives that were strapped to our bodies. After the hump and with the rising sun, we warmed up. Most had stripped … Continue reading



USMC Mountain Survival Course- Part 3, by E.T.

USMC Mountain Survival Course

Second Phase – Individual Survival in the USMC Mountain Survival Course (continued)

I was on the third day of my individual isolation survival of the USMC Mountain Survival course. By mid-afternoon I had improved my fuel (wood) situation, improved my shelter and signaling for rescue, and boiled enough water to fill my plastic bladder and two Nalgene bottles. So I went scrounging for food.

Food for Day Three

I was five yards from a small running stream that provided just enough running water to scoop some out with a metal cup. Another 50 yards downhill from my shelter, the stream emptied into a larger stream several feet across. The stream was small. The fish in it were, at best, three or four inches long. I hooked some line to some low hanging branches, baited the smallest hooks from my fishing kit, and dropped them into … Continue reading



USMC Mountain Survival Course- Part 2, by E.T.

USMC Mountain Survival Course

Rabbits

On the evening of the first night of being in the instructional phase of our USMC Mountain Survival Course, we were handed a pet shop rabbit. The Marine Corps had bought a batch of larger farm raised rabbits, only to find out they carried the nasty Tularemia (rabbit fever). They discovered the disease after looking at the first rabbit’s liver, which was spotted white/yellow and/or swollen. They weren’t willing to accept the risk of disease transmission. So, they searched all the nearby pet shops and bought up all the pet bunnies they could find. Those bunnies were small and cute instead of large and fluffy and full of meat. Mine was black and white. I had always wanted a pet rabbit. Just the same, I didn’t bother naming him since he looked tasty.

Butchering a Rabbit

Using one as an example, the instructors showed how to kill, skin, and … Continue reading



USMC Mountain Survival Course- Part 1, by E.T.

USMC Mountain Survival Course

Preparations For Mountain Survival

I spent June of 2014 in Bridgeport, California at the USMC’s School of Mountain Warfare undergoing the grand reopening of their Mountain Survival Course. Over the span of 13 days, I lost 31 pounds while in training. Here’s my story and lessons learned.

I left an elevation of 3,300 feet in the mountains of North Carolina for Bridgeport, which is at 6,500 feet. The first morning we ran our PFT with less than 12 hours of acclimation to the new elevation. We were required to score a First Class PFT before continuing the course. We had one Marine fail to achieve first class score twice and was shipped back to his unit. That left 26 students with three instructors. Our class consisted of all NCO’s, with a 1st Lieutenant and a Captain thrown in. We were a handful of Scout/Snipers, a Polish Commando, a Headquarters guy … Continue reading



Letter: Gaining Familiarity With Your Prepping Equipment

Having basic camping supplies is a great insurance to have, just in case. It can be both camping and prepping equipment. Your tent, sleeping bag, outdoor cooking supplies, and forms of electricity-free entertainment, are all ripe for testing, as well. The last thing you want to do, in an emergency, is realize that there’s something you need and/or have overlooked. And testing your equipment doesn’t have to be a complicated ordeal. In my case, I had a friend invite me over for backyard camping, for their birthday. Great! So I brought my camping equipment in order to test it out.

My Tent Experiences

The tent was small, quick, and easy to assemble. You may decide to buy for comfort, or get a larger size, in order to accommodate a family. In my case, I decided that ease of set-up was what I was going for. It may be helpful to … Continue reading



Get Home Bag for Teenagers- Part 3, by N.R.

Get Home Bag

We’ve talked about the important of a Get Home Bag for Teenagers in a crisis situation and the basic necessities for this bag in the previous two parts of this article. Now, in this last part of the article, I began to tell you about the secondary elements that could still be critical in some situations. I left off on knives, in particular a larger sheathed knife.

Larger Sheathed Knife (continued)

Now, I want to stress one thing before we go on. Pulling out a weapon, such as a knife, in a fight with another person should be a last resort. If you do this during a disaster situation where law enforcement still exists, you can get in a lot of trouble if you end up seriously injuring your attacker or killing them. If it isn’t apparent you pulled it in self-defense, you could be charged with murder and sent … Continue reading



Get Home Bag for Teenagers- Part 2, by N.R.

Get Home Bag

Review

We looked at one scenario where a Get Home Bag would be critical for teenagers away from home when an emergency occurred. While there are many types of bags that will work, expensive bags are not necessary. We have already looked at the bag itself. So let’s now move on to the other critical elements, the interesting part, which are the things to go inside the bag.

Food

Not MREs or Canned Food

Now, I’m going to say something so we can get this straight from the start. I would not recommend packing MREs Why? They are simply too expensive. They weigh too much and take up a great deal of space. While less expensive, the same goes for canned food. And you simply don’t want a bag that is too heavy to carry long distances or potentially hazardous to your health. I mean, … Continue reading



Get Home Bag for Teenagers- Part 1, by N.R.

Get Home Bag

Imagine you are a teenager out at your friend’s house. Image you are playing video games, the latest Call of Duty game of the franchise. You are having a very good time. It’s a little after six o’clock, but your curfew isn’t for another three hours. Suddenly, without warning, the TV and the PlayStation on which you’re playing cut off. The lights in the room go out as well. The entire house goes dark. You think initially that the circuit breaker may have gone out or that the power in the neighborhood may be out temporarily, again. After all, your friend lives in an old neighborhood. Without any particular reason, you and your friend check your phones and discover they are both dead. Oddly, his battery powered digital alarm is dead as well.

You go out into the living room and discover that all the … Continue reading



Letter Re: EMP Protection Measures

Steel drums

Hugh and James:

I’m missing something regarding EMP protection measures, and I could use some help.

I have researched EMP, how it’s created, and the common frequencies of EMP. I’ve looked into its relative intensity based on creation mode, altitude (in the case of nuclear devices), and the extended effects attributed to conductive networks. I understand what a Faraday cage is and how it works. And I’ve read numerous articles, lots of forum comments, endless opinions, a quantity of engineering documents, and several much learned evaluations on protecting against EMP.

The Problem

So here’s where I keep running aground: Protecting from EMP is, at its base, a simple affair. You provide a conductive shell around what one wishes to protect. Grounding that shell, or not grounding, is a subject of debate. However, my experience with electronics indicates that if the shell is doing its job, grounding it is not a … Continue reading