Note from JWR:

Today we present the final entry for Round 28 of the SurvivalBlog non-fiction writing contest. The prizes for this round will include: First Prize: A.) A course certificate from onPoint Tactical. This certificate will be for the prize winner’s choice of three-day civilian courses. (Excluding those restricted for military or government teams.) Three day onPoint courses normally cost between $500 and $600, and B.) Two cases of Mountain House freeze dried assorted entrees, in #10 cans, courtesy of Ready Made Resources. (A $392 value.) C.) A 9-Tray Excalibur Food Dehydrator from Safecastle.com. (A $275 value.), and D.) A 500 round case of Federal 5.56mm XM193 55 Grain FMJ ammo, courtesy of Sunflower Ammo. This is a $199 value, and includes free UPS shipping. Second Prize: A.) A “grab bag” of preparedness gear and books from Jim’s Amazing Secret Bunker of Redundant Redundancy (JASBORR) with a retail value of at least $400, and B.) two cases of Meals, Ready to Eat (MREs), courtesy of CampingSurvival.com (a $180 value). Third Prize: A.) A copy of my “Rawles Gets You Ready” preparedness course, from Arbogast Publishing, and B.) a Royal Berkey water filter, courtesy of Directive 21. (This filter system is a $275 … Continue reading

Advertisement:

The Un-Secret Garden–Or How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Grow my Garden, by Jason A.

For a lot of survival-minded folks, gardening is one of the first, most logical steps to take toward self-sufficiency.  Most of us agree that when the Schumer hits, the thin veneer of society will be removed so fast that in weeks we won’t even remember it was once there.  Therefore, it is reasonable to conclude that during hard times, a garden could become a prime target for theft, destruction, raids or other attacks.  The most discussed hypothetical garden raids include a Golden Horde or Mutant Zombie Bikers who, like locusts would descend upon your garden and rip it to shreds, leaving nothing more than a memory and bare dirt.  For a lot of us, we imagine fighting to the death with our battle rifles.  They can have my turnips when they pry them from my cold dead fingers and such. The second scenario is much more chilling and difficult to deal with.  This scenario is the nearly feral child or the father stealing to provide for his children.  How do you defend your garden against desperate but opportunistic feeders?  Furthermore, should you?  Obviously harming any trespasser is a savage thing to think of, much less do.  Surplus garden harvests should … Continue reading

Advertisement:

Letter Re: Ammunition and Magazines for Barter

James Wesley: The idea of using ammo as currency has been ridiculed by many. “It’ll never happen.” they say. “It would take an economic catastrophe for ammo to be used as money.” Not so. Today some friends of my wife came over (we were moving) and asked what we had for sale. One gentleman jokingly asked if I had any ammo (.22, .223 and .308) or magazines (Ruger 10/.22 or SKS) for sale. I looked at my wife and she nodded. Okay, she knows them well enough to feel comfortable with the exchange. I don’t need to sell any of it, so it’s a favor to him. I agreed to get him what he needs. It’s not that these items are illegal, or even expensive (although they have appreciated in value since I got them). Rather, the local stores never have any. They get it in once or twice a year and you can only get one box per person and it’s all gone the same day. It’s policy now for the mainland vendors not to ship here to Hawaii. We agreed on a partial sale and trade. He will bring over some venison for a big party and grill … Continue reading

Advertisement:

Letter Re: I Thought that I Had a Clue

JWR: Regarding livestock, I recommend long horned cattle. During the U.S. Civil War, cattle in Texas were left to fend for themselves. By the time the men came home from the end of the war there were over one million wild cattle taking care of business on their own. Many of these cattle were rounded up the next few years, making for the cattle drives north to Kansas and Missouri. If cattle are left feral and have access to water, they are pretty successful in foraging on their own. There is no comparison in maintaining cattle and goats, or sheep. Plus if you’re interested in keeping beef as part of your diet, someone, most likely you, will have to do the hard work in keeping the cattle contained, pasture at optimum, and fresh water available. Or if you’re ,blessed to have a nearby box canyon that is green most of the year round, drive them into it blocking the egress off. Otherwise you could develop fence rows of thick banks of thorn wood, ironwood, and various bushes as wild rose and holly to contain them. Being on a vegan or vegetarian diet after the fact of an infrastructure collapse is … Continue reading

Advertisement:

Economics and Investing:

The following recently ran in The Daily Bell, published in Appenzell, Switzerland: Euro Crisis to Set One World Currency? (OBTW, subscriptions and RSS feeds to The Daily Bell are free. I read it often, and recommend it.) Reader “Two Dogs” sent this interesting analysis: ObamaCare’s Economic Dominoes David R. sent us an op-ed by David Einhorn: Easy Money, Hard Truths. Here is a key quote: “According to the Bank for International Settlements, the United States’ structural deficit — the amount of our deficit adjusted for the economic cycle — has increased from 3.1 percent of gross domestic product in 2007 to 9.2 percent in 2010. This does not take into account the very large liabilities the government has taken on by socializing losses in the housing market. We have not seen the bills for bailing out Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac and even more so the Federal Housing Administration, which is issuing government-guaranteed loans to non-creditworthy borrowers on terms easier than anything offered during the housing bubble.” Items from The Economatrix: Richard Russell: This Market Has Nowhere to Go But Down US Plays Down European Crisis But China Worried Six New Hurdles for Home Financing Euro Currency To Set One … Continue reading

Advertisement:

Odds ‘n Sods:

K.T. recommended this insightful piece over at the Western Rifle Shooters Assn. (WRSA) web page: Lessons From Lithuania    o o o Some of us may have watched a few too many old westerns. For those in the Cowboy Action Shooting fraternity, you’ve gotta check this book out from you library, or get your own copy: Packing Iron: Gun Leather of the Frontier West. The book has a whole chapter devoted to H.H. Heiser, one of my favorite gun leather makers that I discovered back in the days when I rented gun show tables.    o o o I’ve often mentioned the concept of Christian charity in my blog, but have you ever really studied it? This online book might be helpful.    o o o Trent H. sent this news from England: Identity cards scheme will be axed ‘within 100 days’

Advertisement:
Advertisement:

Note from JWR:

Today we present an entry for Round 28 of the SurvivalBlog non-fiction writing contest. The prizes for this round will include: First Prize: A.) A course certificate from onPoint Tactical. This certificate will be for the prize winner’s choice of three-day civilian courses. (Excluding those restricted for military or government teams.) Three day onPoint courses normally cost between $500 and $600, and B.) Two cases of Mountain House freeze dried assorted entrees, in #10 cans, courtesy of Ready Made Resources. (A $392 value.) C.) A 9-Tray Excalibur Food Dehydrator from Safecastle.com. (A $275 value.), and D.) A 500 round case of Federal 5.56mm XM193 55 Grain FMJ ammo, courtesy of Sunflower Ammo. This is a $199 value, and includes free UPS shipping. Second Prize: A.) A “grab bag” of preparedness gear and books from Jim’s Amazing Secret Bunker of Redundant Redundancy (JASBORR) with a retail value of at least $400, and B.) two cases of Meals, Ready to Eat (MREs), courtesy of CampingSurvival.com (a $180 value). Third Prize: A.) A copy of my “Rawles Gets You Ready” preparedness course, from Arbogast Publishing, and B.) a Royal Berkey water filter, courtesy of Directive 21. (This filter system is a $275 value.) … Continue reading

Advertisement:

Desert Water — Where is It?, by Knun

Let’s all hope that the information contained within this article is never used. To put it simply, for most suburban type folks, we would be in a world of hurt if we actually had to use this information during a SHTF situation. Mitigating a basic need such as water should be at the forefront of our preparations. Since preventing ourselves from being in a situation that would require the skills I will describe is ten times better than using them. With that in mind I have also described techniques to minimize the need to utilize these skills. If you live in or near a desert environment then preparedness is the best course of action with regards to water. Are there springs, pools, water holes, canals, or any other sources of water nearby? In this discussion nearby is a relative term. Do you plan on driving 100 miles through the desert on the interstate in a bug out situation? If so, 100 miles should be considered nearby. Plan and prepare accordingly. Be prepared to find water, when it’s over 100 degrees, with minimal disruption to your travels and your well being. Ask yourself how far you could travel, on foot, in … Continue reading

Advertisement:

Letter Re: “Special Operations Mission” Television Series

JWR, I have recently been viewing a show on Netflix [via “Watch Instantly”, on-line] that I believe contains information your readers would be interested in. The show is called, “Special Ops Mission.” It is a war game show filmed part, “Survivorman,” style, and part film crew. A lone operator is given a couple objectives and a four man enemy team (and time limits) to compete against. The weapons are real, but firing simunitions. Both parties talk about the tactics they employ, tactics they wouldn’t use, and some of their thought processes in their decisions. There is much food for thought, to put it short. Thanks for all you do. – C.B. in Albemarle Co.

Advertisement:

Economics and Investing:

Brian B. mentioned this commentary by Robert Prechter: Gold Correction Factors, Hidden Dollar Swap Hammer. Signs of the times: Wait grows longer for Rhode Island tax refunds My old friend Fred The Valmetmeister wrote: “It looks like some of us will be paying a lot more tax next year – [in all] more than 50 percent [income tax]. The 35 percent [Federal income tax] rate goes back to 39.6 percent next year, plus state income tax (6.9 percent in my state) plus 3.8 percent to cover the new health care that just passed. I find it amazing that dividends will be taxed like ordinary income; that will get all the old people; it’ll get the ones who voted for BHO and they thought that only ‘the rich’ would have to pay…” Items from The Economatrix: Debt Level, Spending Pose Risk to U.S.’s Aaa Credit Rating, Moody’s Says Greek Scramble for Physical Brings Gold Price to $1,700 Per Ounce Big Brother’s Lock on Your Money is Complete Stocks Close Out Their Worst Month in Over a Year

Advertisement:

Odds ‘n Sods:

K. in Montana forwarded a link to the Livin’ The Dream blog: Preparedness Apologetics.    o o o Chad S. spotted this on a North Dakota State University web site: Preservation of Game Meats and Fish    o o o Lest we dwell too much on heaven and not the alternative, Hank D. suggested reading some sermons on hell.    o o o Senate Takes Up “Emergency” War Bill Despite Obama Pledge to End Practice

Advertisement: