Raising Poultry in the Rocky Mountain West, by WyoDutch

My wife and I operate a pastured poultry business in Northwest Wyoming at an altitude 6,000 feet. I grew up on a poultry farm back when everything was pastured and organic. Things were simpler then… the weak, fast growing commercial birds had not yet been developed, and we didn’t have to contend with many of the exotic diseases that international trade has brought to the American farm. For a breeding flock of 75 turkeys plus a chicken operation, we have a total of six acres devoted to pens and pastures. Our land is high desert with no supplemental irrigation. Years …




Recipe of the Week: Gomma’s Mushroom Chicken in Sherry

This was an old a Rawles family favorite. Ingredients 4 Large Chicken Breasts, skinless (or substitute 6 small skinless breasts.) 1 Can Cream of Mushroom Soup 1 C Sour Cream 1/2 C Cooking Sherry 8 Ounces Sliced Mushrooms Paprika, to taste. Directions Put Chicken in a large, lightly-greased rectangular baking dish. Mix together the soup, sour cream, mushrooms and sherry, in a large bowl. Then pour over the chicken breasts. Sprinkle with paprika. Bake uncovered at 375 F for 1 hour to 1-1/2 hours, until juices run clear. Notes and Serving Suggestions I usually serve this over a bed of …




S.A.’s Book Review: The Bunker

A Review of The Bunker: Surviving an Economic Collapse by Wayne Bosak MORE REALISTIC THAN MOST Finally, an apocalyptic book that shows a truer picture of human nature than any other that I’ve read. My belief is that the world is full of good people, and not everyone with a can of Mountain House is a bloodthirsty gunslinger. In the novel The Bunker: Surviving an Economic Collapse, by Wayne Bosak, the main characters are, of course, trying to get home. They encounter many normal people who give them shelter and aid. Sure, there are the usual gangs, looters, and murderers …




Camouflaging Techniques, by Concealed Prepper – Part 2

(Continued from Part 1. This part concludes the article.) Vehicles Vehicles are a little more difficult to camouflage. The easiest way to get at least some camouflage on your vehicle is just to repaint it a flat earth tone. If you want to go more serious than that you will need some Hessian poles. These are long poles that stick in the ground and are draped with camouflage netting. They are designed to break up the distinctive outline of a vehicle. If you have any large length of scrap metal or smooth branches around , you can use them  or …




Camouflaging Techniques, by Concealed Prepper – Part 1

When times get bad, and you feel unprotected and exposed, you will want to have camouflage to keep you and your family safe. For some people that may mean just a simple set of BDUs or even just the first camo clothing you see at Walmart. However, that may not be enough. There is a lot more to camouflage and concealment than just these. Get proper camouflage: you will want some proper mil spec BDUs. These are sturdy and will come in handy for making ghillie suits, holding extra supplies, and recognizing your fellow group members. It is not necessary …




Home Repair of Pre-1899 Guns – Part 3, by SwampFox

(Continued from Part 2. This part concludes the series.) Pre-1899 Shotguns Shotguns from the late 1800s cartridge era are typically of a break-open design. There were pump action and lever action shotguns available such as those produced by Winchester, but they often command a high price. Old farm guns are easy to obtain and simple to work on. Often available online for under $300 or even as little as $100, they can be shipped to your door. Almost every hardware store in rural areas would have carried shotguns, and some even had their own locally produced models. This can make …




Home Repair of Pre-1899 Guns – Part 2, by SwampFox

(Continued from Part 1) When other parts on revolvers break, fixing them can be a hassle. If a bolt or a hand breaks, you will need to be an expert at welding, brazing, filing, and fitting if you cannot find a replacement. Even if you do find a replacement, be prepared to hand fit the part, as quality control today is greater than it was back then. Fitting a hand precisely is essential! The length of the hand determines how far a cylinder rotates, and how the chambers align with the barrel. Misalignment can cause poor accuracy, or can become …




Home Repair of Pre-1899 Guns – Part 1, by SwampFox

Introduction As regulations increase in the United States, it is possible that the only firearms that will be legal to transfer in the future without a background check will be those manufactured before 1899. These firearms are Federally exempt from the NICS background check process, and are likely to increase in value in the event that “universal background check” legislation is passed. For those who already own pre-1899 guns, or would like to acquire them, there is an unpleasant reality to their ownership: Some parts are fragile and are difficult to obtain! A broken, worn, or out-of-spec part can cause …




Recipe of the Week: Gayle’s Vegetarian Tortilla Soup Variation

This is a variation of a widely-published and shared recipe. Ingredients 1 (1 pound) package frozen pepper and onion stir fry mix (or fresh equivalent) 2 tablespoons vegetable oil 2 cloves garlic, minced 3 tablespoons ground cumin 1 (28 ounce) can crushed tomatoes 3 (4 ounce) cans chopped green chile peppers, drained 4 (14 ounce) cans vegetable broth (or equivalent volume of homemade broth.) 1 (11 ounce) can whole kernel corn (or fresh or frozen equivalent volume) 12 ounces tortilla chips 1 cup shredded Cheddar cheese 1 avocado – peeled, pitted and diced Salt and pepper to taste Directions Heat …




Your Firearms Safety Hunter Education Certificate, by LiberT.Y.

Why Everyone Should Have a Firearms Safety Hunter Education Certificate Hello everyone. I’m 13 years old and I live in Minnesota (I know it’s not the best state, but I’m 13 so I don’t have a lot of options). I know other minors read Survival Blog too and this is mostly written to you but hopefully adults will like it too. I would first like to say that I am not a lawyer so double check all laws mentioned and cited here. I only have experience with the Minnesota program I attended, and any quotations by instructors contained in this …




Retreat Owner Profile: Mr. and Mrs. Smith

Editor’s Introductory Note:  We have been posting Retreat Owner Profiles since the early days of SurvivalBlog, in 2005. Although the archive of these profiles is now essentially static, we always welcome more to add. In particular, we are looking for profiles of families living outside of the United States, or families that have unusual locales or ways of living off the land. For example, we still haven’t seen a profile of someone who lives full time on a sailboat. Nor a profile of someone who has an operating mine on their property, or of a fish farmer, or someone who …




The Myth of Stored Food, by Pete Thorsen

Many preppers think if they merely store food then they are done–that they have saved their family. And that might be true if they experience a natural disaster in their area which does not allow shopping for a week or so. They have their stored food and just use that during the emergency. Later–if they remember they buy replacements for the food they used–they made their family much more comfortable during that emergency by having that stored food. Plus one for the prepper family. But what about a long term nationwide disaster? What if it is a total economic collapse, …




Commercial Ammo: The Untold History of Springfield Armory

The following article first appeared at Ammo.com. It is re-posted with permission To understand how American citizens today can get their hands on ammo, which rolls off the same factory lines as those that supply the world’s largest militaries, it’s important to first understand how munitions technology developed. Starting in medieval Europe, on a battlefield where a mounted knight in armor could defeat almost any number of peasants, the development of more advanced and accurate ways to destroy enemy personnel and equipment by launching a projectile is one which combines trial and error, scientific ingenuity, and private enterprise. It’s a …




Control Your Type 2 Diabetes or Die in TEOTWAWKI, by Scott M.

I am a family physician and I have type 2 diabetes. Type 2 diabetes is where you initially have enough insulin produced by your body but are resistant to the insulin, i.e.:  you don’t have enough receptors for the insulin to plug into to act on the sugar/carbohydrates you ingest. As time goes on if you don’t manage your diabetes your body will stop producing insulin and you will need to be on insulin shots for the rest of your life. Type 1 diabetes is where you don’t produce any or very limited insulin and have to be on insulin for your lifetime. …




Recipe of the Week: Enola Gay’s Beef Cabbage Soup

This recipe first appeared in Enola Gay’s book: The Prepared Family Cookbook. By the way, we highly recommend both Enola Gay’s Paratus Familia blog and all of her books. Ingredients 1 Pound Ground Beef (or venison, rabbit, etc.) 1/2 Head of Cabbage, shredded 2 Ribs of Celery, sliced (or celerac) 1 Small Bell Pepper, cut into small pieces (or dried peppers) 1 Medium Diced Onion (or dried onions) 2 Cups Cooked Kidney Beans (or (1) 16oz. can) 2 Cups Diced Canned Tomatoes (or fresh) 4 Cups of Water 2 T Beef Bouillon (or pwd soup base) 1/4 tsp Garlic powder (or …