Economics and Investing:

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Every Time This Has Happened, A Recession Followed

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New banking normal where lending $2 increases GDP by $1: US bank credit up 44 percent since 2008 while GDP up 21 percent.

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Items from Professor Preponomics:

US News

Inflation as a Policy (Mises) Excerpt: “…the more evident the evil consequences of inflation became, the more rabid became the demands for still more inflation to cure them.”

Investors Look for Signs of Future Fed Action (Financial Times) Excerpt: “You don’t get the sense going into this [meeting] that there is a solid consensus,” Ms Swonk said. “It is more dissonance than a symphony.”

Fed Set to Keep Rates Unchanged, May Nod to Ebbing Risks (Reuters) Excerpt: “The Fed may be wary of making too strong a judgment on the resilience of the U.S. economy come June until it has more data.”

Beyond the American Manufacturing Competitiveness Act: Congress Should Get More Serious about Tarriff Reform (Cato) Excerpt: “…Congress should be thinking bigger—much bigger—than the AMCA.”

International News

Banks Will Reach a Point When They Can No Longer Cut Rates. Is this it? (The Telegraph) Excerpt: “When rates are low or negative, banks face costs for holding deposits. This is passed on to customers any way the banks can, possibly by way of higher charges or by raising borrowing rates.”

The World is Turning It’s Back on One of the Greatest Economic Trends of the Last Century (Business Insider) Excerpt: “There is significant anti-globalization sentiment out there,” said Quinlan. “People are blaming flatline economic growth and wages on the move to globalization, jobs moving to China and Mexico, and automating.”

Personal Economics and Household Finance

9 Farmer’s Market Shopping Tips That Will Help You Save Big and Get the Best Produce (Fun Happy Home) Excerpt: “If you’ve never shopped the Farmer’s Market before, here are some helpful tips to help you save big and get super tasty produce!”

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