Note from JWR:

Today we present the final entry for Round 30 of the SurvivalBlog non-fiction writing contest. The prizes for this round will include:

First Prize: A.) A course certificate from onPoint Tactical. This certificate will be for the prize winner’s choice of three-day civilian courses. (Excluding those restricted for military or government teams.) Three day onPoint courses normally cost between $500 and $600, and B.) Two cases of Mountain House freeze dried assorted entrees, in #10 cans, courtesy of Ready Made Resources. (A $392 value.) C.) A 9-Tray Excalibur Food Dehydrator from Safecastle.com (a $275 value), D.) A 500 round case of Fiocchi 9mm Parabellum (Luger ) with 124gr. Hornady XTP/HP projectiles, courtesy of Sunflower Ammo (a $249 value), and E.) An M17 medical kit from JRH Enterprises (a $179.95 value).

Second Prize: A.) A “grab bag” of preparedness gear and books … Continue reading




Filling in the Gaps on Firefighting and Emergency Medicine, by Nate

I’ll be the first to admit this is my first visit to SurvivalBlog, and I only received copy of “How to Survive the End of the World as We Know It” yesterday, but I finished reading it yesterday as well. I’ve always had what I like to call a “jack of all trades” mentality, as soon as I begin to feel competent in one skill, I have a strong urge to begin the learning process anew and expand my base of knowledge.

I’ve been reading through the articles previously posted, and while extremely helpful and informative, I feel I have found a few gaps.  Many critically important things are mentioned casually or in passing, and then simply left there by the wayside.  I hope with this article to give a brief overview to fill in some holes, at least as they intersect with my current skill set. (Give … Continue reading




Letter Re: A Little Insight on Diesel Engines

JWR,
I can’t wait to read the sequels to your novel. I’m writing on the topic of pre-electronic ignition diesel trucks — preferably a 1998 model year or older Dodge with the 5.9 Cummins engine.

Having serviced and rebuilt several of these engines I am familiar with the design, and it is certainly my favorite. I won’t go into much detail on the 24-valve engine because they may not be of use in the event of an EMP, or a grid-down collapse where diagnostics cannot be performed. (For reference, there is the 12 valve- ’89-’98 5.9 Manual (non computer/electronic) Cummins Engine with 12 valves, 6 intake and 6 exhaust, and the 24 valve- ’99-’08 computer controlled 5.9 Cummins Engine, having 24 valves,12 intake and 12 exhaust.)

First let’s look at the difference in some of the engines that Cummins made for Dodge in the ’89-’98 … Continue reading




Economics and Investing:

H.H. sent this: European Central Banks Halt Gold Sales

Jeff E. was the first of several readers to send this: Banks Keep Failing, No End in Sight

From G.G.: Banks Keep Failing, No End in Sight

U.S. Economy “Close to a destructive tipping point” Glenn Hubbard Says. (Thanks to John G. for the link.)

Merry recommended a Mike Maloney lecture video.

Items from The Economatrix:

Cold Hard Reality Hits Oregon

Supply Squeeze of Physical Gold and Silver May Be Heating Up

The Currency Crisis of 2010-2011

A Hazard of Buying Bond Funds Now

A Red Alert Threat To The Regime

Sour Economic Mood in Living Room and Board Room

Recession Rips at US Marriages, Expands Income Gap




Odds ‘n Sods:

Ten signs that the U.S. is Losing it Influence in the Western Hemisphere. (A hat tip to Paul W. for the link.)

   o o o

More Celebrities Than Ever Are Carrying Firearms. The blatant favoritism in permit issuance is a scandal that has never been fully exposed. New York City has had a long succession of Teflon-coated mayors. The gun permit scandal doesn’t stick where it should!

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Bird Flu Simmers. (Thanks to Ken J. for the link.)

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J.H. sent this article from the Guardian: Campaign to save Pavlovsk seed bank from being turned over to housing developers. (As one of the commentators added: Technically, it is a field gene bank, not a seed bank.)

 







Note from JWR:

Today we present another entry for Round 30 of the SurvivalBlog non-fiction writing contest. The prizes for this round will include:

First Prize: A.) A course certificate from onPoint Tactical. This certificate will be for the prize winner’s choice of three-day civilian courses. (Excluding those restricted for military or government teams.) Three day onPoint courses normally cost between $500 and $600, and B.) Two cases of Mountain House freeze dried assorted entrees, in #10 cans, courtesy of Ready Made Resources. (A $392 value.) C.) A 9-Tray Excalibur Food Dehydrator from Safecastle.com (a $275 value), D.) A 500 round case of Fiocchi 9mm Parabellum (Luger ) with 124gr. Hornady XTP/HP projectiles, courtesy of Sunflower Ammo (a $249 value), and E.) An M17 medical kit from JRH Enterprises (a $179.95 value).

Second Prize: A.) A “grab bag” of preparedness gear and books from … Continue reading




Letter Re: The Survival Mindset–Becoming Part of the Social Ecosystem

Hello James:
In many ways, communities behave like biological organisms. They respond to foreign invaders like our bodies respond to the flu virus. They respond to “us” like our bodies respond to “us”. They may not actively nourish teeth, hair or fingernails, but they do not reject them either.

One key aspect to creating community is to be visible before the balloon goes up.

I run for exercise. I tend to wear the same kinds of outfit every time I run: a swim trunks and a brown tie-dyed shirt. My runs extend 8 miles out. Some Sundays I run home from church (8 miles). A couple of days a year I run home from work (12 miles). Most runs are a circular route or an out-and-back that stays within 4.5 miles of home.

I like to run my routes in both directions. Inertia makes it easy to run the … Continue reading




Letter Re: Aviation-Style Checklists for Survival, by Andy W.

In the 1940s, the accident rate among aircraft in the United States was horrendous, especially for small private aircraft. Many lives were lost and airplanes mangled due to often preventable causes. By the mid-1950s, the accident rates had dropped by 30-50%, depending on what numbers you look at. What happened to make such a dramatic change? The answer is the prevalent use of checklists for all phases of flight. Every aircraft today, from a tiny Cessna to a giant airliner, has checklist for every procedure from preflight inspection to securing the aircraft after parking.

Checklists are important for a few reasons. The first is human nature and complacency. If you do something often, it goes into muscle memory and you don’t really have to think about it anymore. As a result, you might start to take shortcuts. How many times have you gotten in your car and realized that the … Continue reading




Economics and Investing:

KAF pointed us to this: On the Secret Committee to Save the Euro, a Dangerous Divide

Mike Williamson sent us this: Slideshow: The Most Taxed States in the U.S.

G.G. suggested: Taleb Says Unawareness of Deficit Risk Has Him `Extremely Bearish’ on U.S.

The latest from Dr. Housing Bubble: Palms Mar Vista correction. From $740,000 to $540,000 and still overpriced. The Westside of L.A. enters an accelerating correction.

Items from The Economatrix:

Why QE2 + QE Lite Mean that the Fed Will Purchase Almost $3 Trillion Treasurys and Set the Stage for the Monetary Endgame

Banks Keep Failing, No End in Sight

The Credit Meltdown and the Shadow Banking System: What Basel III Missed

Recession Not Over, Double-Dip or Worse Coming

Martin Weiss: Three Government Warnings of Financial Fiascos!

Facts … Continue reading




Odds ‘n Sods:

Dirk W. sent us this news story: The New Resource Wars: What if China Stops Exporting Rare Elements?

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The Heat Wave that Changed American History. (Thanks to “T-Moo” for the link.)

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Safecastle’s big sale ends tomorrow–Thursday, Sept. 30th. This is their last 25% off sale on Mountain House canned storage foods for 2010, with some free bonus items, depending on the size of your order. Safecastle also resumed stocking real canned butter, from Holland. Don’t miss out!

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EliteT sent this from CNN: Why is ‘food security’ sparking unrest?

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Bill M. in New York flagged this: Who is watching you? Nine Industries that know your every move.




Jim’s Quote of the Day:

“War has taught me that each one of us contains every ingredient of the human recipe. By varying measure we are all cowards and brave men, thieves and honest men, selfish and selfless men, malingerers and champions, weasels and lions. The only question is how much of each attribute we allow- or force – to dominate our being.” – Eric L. Haney, Command Sergeant Major US Army, from his book “Inside Delta Force




Note from JWR:

Today we present another entry for Round 30 of the SurvivalBlog non-fiction writing contest. The prizes for this round will include:

First Prize: A.) A course certificate from onPoint Tactical. This certificate will be for the prize winner’s choice of three-day civilian courses. (Excluding those restricted for military or government teams.) Three day onPoint courses normally cost between $500 and $600, and B.) Two cases of Mountain House freeze dried assorted entrees, in #10 cans, courtesy of Ready Made Resources. (A $392 value.) C.) A 9-Tray Excalibur Food Dehydrator from Safecastle.com (a $275 value), D.) A 500 round case of Fiocchi 9mm Parabellum (Luger ) with 124gr. Hornady XTP/HP projectiles, courtesy of Sunflower Ammo (a $249 value), and E.) An M17 medical kit from JRH Enterprises (a $179.95 value).

Second Prize: A.) A “grab bag” of preparedness gear and books from … Continue reading




Dirty Medicine, Part 2, by J.V. in Tacoma, Washington

Welcome to the second installment of Dirty Medicine.  Today we are going to be discussing something that will be beneficial on a few different levels.  It can help you stop uncontrolled bleeding, prevent infection, and repair skin.  That’s right, we are going to talk about sutures, also called stitches, today.

Starting off we are going to need to define what materials will be needed, both for practice and for real life situations.  The most obvious item needed is going to be some sort of suture material.  Suture materials come in various thread compositions as well as sizes.  Something like Chromic Gut (cat Gut) or Polyglycolic Acid is best used for inside the body or mouth as these dissolve after a week or so.  Polypropylene or Ethicon would be better served for skin closer or for tying off a bleeder.

My preferred site for obtaining suture materials is EmergencyEssentials.com. … Continue reading




Letter Re: “Tomorrow When The War Began” Tops Australian Box Offices

James Wesley:
The movie Tomorrow When The War Began–a Red Dawn-style movie produced and set in Australia–is currently #1 in their box office reports. The story is based on a series of books that has been recommended reading in many middle schools. Currently no one is lined up for distribution rights in America, but after the last few days I’m sure there is a new interest by the money hungry studios.

And the series of books is available on Amazon. Regards, – Justin M.