Search Results for: six primitive traps

Bare Bones Survival, by Blake R.

…run out?  Don’t think it can’t happen to you.  We’re all preparing because it provides a sort of insurance against the countless what ifs.  Think of primitive survival skills as your reinsurance or back up to your back up plan.  The purpose of this article is to provoke thought and discussion to the subject of primitive survival and to serve as a brief introduction on “how to.”  When I say bare bones survival I mean just that.  No knives, saws, axes, cordage, rope, water filters, bottles, bladders, portable shelters, lighters, flints, matches, stoves, fuel, or food.  I think you get the point.  The one exception is the clothing on your back since practicing primitive skills nude in the woods would probably be a one way ticket to the insane asylum. SHELTER Most primitive survival situations, pre or post TEOTWAWKI, will require shelter.  It’s probable that this will also be your… Continue reading




Minimizing The BOB And Permaculture, by N.E.

…cordage, and how to use that cordage to make traps. While fire by friction does take longer than flicking a bic or striking flint steel, it did serve as a comfort to learn that by knowing just a single tree, such as the Basswood, I can make fire, cordage, and obtain food, all from recognizing and obtaining this single species. This knowledge weighs nothing. Also during the primitive course, I made a water-proof, primitive shelter. While this is great knowledge, it is not practical. I suggest making a primitive water-proof shelter is not practical, because you won’t have the time required to make a water poof primitive shelter (that could take 3 to 6+ hours to make), once you see storm clouds moving in. Not to mention, the large amount of energy you exhaust making such a shelter. Because of this experience, a rain tarp went to the top of… Continue reading




Knowledge of Survival, by Heather F.

…Everyone writes about what you need to survive the end; but no one writes about what you need to know before the end happens. Protection, Water purification, hunting, trapping, cleaning an animal, sewing, soap making, and herbal knowledge are just a few examples of what I consider to be incredibly important to know. Now, I know what you all are thinking, males got this down for the most part, right? Well what about your women. What happens to them if god forbid they get separated? Can they take care of themselves. A lot of women couldn’t. Protection is pretty straightforward, you think you have it covered with a gun right? What happens when you run out of cartridges? Do you know how to make gun powder? Do you know how to reload fired brass? If not then you might consider learning a primitive skill, bow and arrow making. It’s… Continue reading




Scot’s Product Review: Survival Skills DVD Set Sigma 3 Survival School

…has built ones that lasted as long as 60 hours. As he pointed out, if you can sleep through the night rather than getting up to add wood to a fire, you will be in far better shape. Rest is critical to well-being, and you won’t get it if you get cold and wake repeatedly through the night. After fire, Allen and Hamlin move into food and how to acquire meat using entirely primitive traps, like the Paiute deadfall trap or with snares made with the picture wire you have in your EDC kit. Allen also tells us about traps we might have been cunning enough to have brought with us. I hadn’t thought of having traps in my bugout kit, but I am now planning to add some. Hamlin, as mentioned above, enjoys rats, and Allen likes beaver, neither of which I have tried. I am a bit more… Continue reading




Learning Traditional Skills, by R.I.P.

…layers of wool, most likely the deer are bedded down, you are the only one crazy enough to be out there. Don’t forget that snares can be used for fishing. When you are learning the plants look also for those that have some part that can be put in a small body of water to stun fish. I could go on for a few days, but maybe there will something here that will be of some use to someone. Here is a list of recommended reading, the ones written by those who have actually lived what they write. Outdoor Survival: Primitive Wilderness Living & Survival Skills: Naked into the Wilderness by John & Geri McPherson How to Survive Anywhere by Christopher Nyerges Wilderness Survival Handbook: Primitive Skills for Short-Term Survival and Long-Term Comfort by Michael Pewtherer Any books or field guides written by Tom Brown, Jr. Plants: A Field Guide… Continue reading




Considerations for Raising Chickens After TEOTWAWKI, by Gospel Guy

…chicken feed does not store well. Commercial feed goes rancid quickly, often in as little as two months, particularly if the feed contains extruded soy beans. The best choice in storage feed for chickens is feed grade whole yellow corn or sorghum, whole oats, wheat and Azomite, a mineral supplement. Azomite is a highly regarded natural mineral product which is economical and suitable for use in livestock feed, as a soil amendment and a tonic for humans. The survivalist who is committed to the long-term survival of his poultry should store a one or two year supply of feed and seed to plant future crops of grain. Seed corn does not store well and germination rates decline rapidly. Annual rotation of the open-pollinated seed corn is strongly recommended. Some farmers in living in primitive and very remote areas of the third world store a two year supply of seed corn…. Continue reading




SurvivalBlog’s Quick-Start Guide for Preparedness Newbies

…your gas main (or propane tank), and shut your main water valve (or turn off your well pump.) Spend that weekend in primitive conditions. Practice using only your storage food, preparing it on a wood stove (or camping stove.) A “TEOTWAWKI Weekend Experiment” will surprise you. Things that you take for granted will suddenly become labor intensive. False assumptions will be shattered. Your family will grow closer and more confident. Most importantly, some of the most thorough lists that you will ever make will be those written by candlelight.  The Ultimate in Preparedness–A Rural Retreat The ultimate in family preparedness is having a well-stocked rural retreat with a plentiful water supply, located in a lightly-populated agricultural area that is well-removed from major population centers. Less than 1% of the population has a dedicated survival retreat. It is an expensive proposition, but it can be a practical alternative that can double… Continue reading




Start With a “List of Lists”

…main (or propane tank), and shut your main water valve (or turn off your well pump.) Spend that weekend in primitive conditions. Practice using only your storage food, preparing it on a wood stove (or camping stove.) A “TEOTWAWKI Weekend Experiment” will surprise you. Things that you take for granted will suddenly become labor intensive. False assumptions will be shattered. Your family will grow closer and more confident. Most importantly, some of the most thorough lists that you will ever make will be those written by candlelight! (Note: I’ve posted the two preceding paragraphs before, but it bears repeating.) Your List of Lists should include: (Sorry that this post is in outline form, but it would take a full length book to discus all of the following in great detail) Water List Food Storage List Food Preparation List Personal List First Aid /Minor Surgery List Nuke Defense List Biological Warfare… Continue reading




Survival Slingshots, by Brian W.

…the consequences of getting it wrong, cause many hikers to just leave them at home. With the threat of a felony conviction, fines, jail time, confiscation of your weapon, and future headache associated, it just doesn’t seem worth the trouble. Slingshots bridge the gap between small but possibly illegal .22 handguns and snares for catching dinner in the wild. Other primitive weapons have limitations that often leave them in the back of the pickup when you need them. Bows and arrows are unwieldy and not usually taken on simple nature hikes. The atlatl is difficult to master for even the most ardent of survivalists, let alone carrying around a 5 foot arrow. Weapons such as the boomerang and bolo take skill and are not designed for small game. Blow guns are fine but are limited to the number of darts you have brought along. Making darts by hand takes time… Continue reading




Outdoor Survival–The Basics, by Alan B.

…the human. Few other animals help each other the way that human beings do. I know a lot of people just don’t feel that they have the time or resources to prepare for something they believe will never happen. All I can say is read your history books. Catastrophes happen every day. It may not be the end of the world for everyone else, but it might be for you. I’ve read a lot of survival manuals and I think this article pretty much puts it all together in simple terms. You do need to practice as many survival techniques as you can. I could hardly get an ember going with a primitive bow drill, but I eventually did it. It took a better part of an afternoon to learn how. This is truly valuable experience. The Boy Scout handbook is a good place to start. [JWR Adds: I recommend… Continue reading




Retreat Owner Profiles

…see what’s in front of them. We simply accept the fact that this country has changed, and is now too dangerous, too corrupt, insecure and too primitive for the standard of life we look forward to, and we take the necessary measures, meaning we move out of it and start a life somewhere else.   International Profile 5: Mr. and Mrs. Tico in Costa Rica| Mr. and Mrs. Tico Present home : Farm in Northern Costa Rica Ages : 54 & 57 Two sons 30 & 32, who are living in North Carolina. Income $50,000 USD/year secure (many diverse overseas investments) and a tourism business currently at $120,000 or so per year (I own a botanical garden) . Additional income from fruit groves and tilapia ponds $15,000/year. Profession : Gunsmith, nursery grower, waterscaper, fish farmer . Vehicles : Two 1970s Toyota Land Cruiser BJ40’s with 2.4 diesel engines, kept in… Continue reading