Adapting Traditional Medical Care to the Austere Environment, by A.P.T.

contributions to society must be extended into whatever challenging environments that we may face as society. There are four main differences in your practice that will be very different in the austere environment that must be understood. First, you may need to defer treatment and walk away from patients that you would currently treat aggressively. Second, you will need to get out of the mindset of transport or referral to definitive care. Third, will be the need for improvisation in supplies. Finally, you will need to develop or expand your knowledge of preventative medicine. The overall goal will be to treat what you can, given what you have, and keep minor to moderate medical/trauma conditions from worsening, or better yet, not occurring. It will truly be a mix of modern medicine, public health, wilderness medicine and elements of combat medicine. Your triage, initial assessment and ABCs will be the same…




Letter: Updated Survival & Austere Medicine Book

not make. If you have time/money etc – take the Red Cross 1st Aid courses, join a CERT team, GET TRAINING. Survival and Austere Medicine: An introduction V3 https://www.ausprep.org/manuals Where There Is No Doctor Where There Is No Dentist http://hesperian.org/books-and-resources/ The Ship Captain’s Medical Guide https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/the-ship-captains-medical-guide 2007 Ranger Medic Handbook http://www.patriotresistance.com/Ranger_Medic_Handbook_2007_1_.pdf Save Lives Save Limbs http://traumatologi.no/save-lives-save-limbs-life-support-to-victims-of-mines-wars-and-accident/ END DOWNLOAD FOR FREE BEGIN the you have to pay money for these section. The following two books were recommended as being better than the Where There Is No books listed above. One of the primary authors of Survival and Austere Medicine: An introduction V3 made the recommendations. I do not have nor have I read them but I’ll the recommendation as being a good one Wilderness and Survival Medicine 2014: 2nd Edition https://www.amazon.com/Wilderness-Survival-Medicine-2014-2nd/dp/1493720031 Emergency Dentistry Handbook: Providing Dental Care In Disaster Areas, Combat Zones, and Other Austere Environments https://www.amazon.com/Emergency-Dentistry-Handbook-Providing-Environments/dp/1610040449/ Ditch Medicine Ditch Medicine:…




Letter Re: Another Recommendation for the Survival and Austere Medicine e-Text

Mr. Rawles, The subject of survival medicine is one which you touched upon in your novel “Patriots” (nicely done, I might add) as well as occasionally via letters to your blog. All well and good but far less than the subject merits insofar as it may weigh into our collective futures. If I may be so bold I’d like to suggest that it be given at least as much attention as the nifty gadgets readers are often eager to promote. You may or not be aware of a relatively new book on the subject, perhaps the first if not the only peer-reviewed volume on the subject of survival medicine in general. I am speaking of the 2005 publication of Survival and Austere Medicine: An Introduction. The book was written by a small group of writers that include two physicians trained and practiced in the art of medical care under unusually…




Guest Article: The Best Free Medical References for Preppers, by Greg Ellifritz

…kinds of skills, think about the environment in which you will be practicing.  Don’t just save these to your computer.  If there are power outages or if there is an EMP event, your computer won’t likely work.  Print them out or order the books in hard copy form.  There’s nothing like having a real book when the lights go out! If you want to learn more and buy some actual hard copy books for reference material, it would be a good investment.  I recommend the following: Wilderness Medicine, 5th Edition by Paul S. Auerbach 2012 Nurse’s Drug Handbook Ditch Medicine: Advanced Field Procedures For Emergencies by Hugh Coffee Medicine for the Outdoors by Paul Auerbach The Merck Manual of Diagnosis and Therapy Primary Surgery: Volume 1: Non-Trauma by Maurice King Primary Surgery: Volume 2: Trauma by Maurice King The Sanford Guide to Antimicrobial Therapy 2012 Edited by David Gilbert Tactical…




Re-Write of the Austere and Survival Medicine Book

Hi James, I’ve decided to embark on a re-write of the Austere and Survival Medicine book. I know a number of MDs and other health professional read SurvivalBlog. If you think it appropriate would you mind posting a request for chapter authors on your blog. We will be starting with the existing book with the goal of adding more “how to” to the book and by popular demand also making some of the advice even more austere and primitive. The goal is to empower non-medical people to prepare medically for major medium and long term disasters. Once again the book will be available for free download or purchase for cost from CafePress. People who are interested can be directed to this link. – Dr. Craig in NZ…




Musings of a Law Enforcement Paramedic – Part 1, by LEO Medic

…struggle when you take them out of their comfort zone. So what is the solution, besides becoming a Wilderness paramedic, marrying a nurse, and going to Cynthia Koelker’s Survival Medicine class, or recruiting a trauma surgeon? First, realize the limitations of your current training. Then address them. If you are an EMT, get training on bandaging, infection control, rehab, suturing, dentistry, et cetera. If you are a nurse, look into getting EMT trained or buy and read a EMS text. Most states will let a nurse challenge the test and test out. Like Mary Gray in Patriots, think about the skills you may need (for example blood transfusions or suturing) and then seek out training in them. I have a cousin in the Peace Corps. I have used this to start all sorts of conversations with doctors I come across to ask questions about medicine in austere conditions. If you…




Health, Hygiene, Fitness and Medical Care in a Coming Collapse, by RangerDoc

physical fitness. Preventative Medicine Next issue: public health measures. For many years I taught and practiced medical and surgical care in austere environments. In the late 1990s I was the chief of the medical special response teams for the US Army, Pacific, and taught disaster planning and medical care in austere environments around the world as a Department of Defense consultant. If I had to choose between having access to modern medical care and having a sound public sanitation system and clean water, it would be a no-brainer. The clean water and hygienic handling of human waste as first perfected in the twentieth century have saved many more lives than have antibiotics and modern surgery. Hepatitis, polio, typhoid fever, dysentery and other waste and waterborne diseases have defeated far more armies throughout history than have poor tactics and strategy. Witness [German General Erwin] Rommel’s own struggle with hepatitis during the…




Letter Re: Adapting Traditional Medical Care to the Austere Environment

Mr. Rawles, I enjoyed the referenced article, and wanted to piggyback a point about triage in combat. Combat medicine is different than a mass casualty incident in a non combat scenario. Good medicine may be bad tactics. In combat, treat those in the yellow category (such as having a finger shot off) first- to get more guns back into the fight. Otherwise you may all die, and that’s bad juju. Don’t waste time on an expectant casualty (i.e. a gunshot wound to the head with brain matter showing). Move instead to the casualty with extremity bleeding where they may be bandaged or tourniqueted and put back into the fight. In TEOTWAWKI, combat may be a hard fact of life and the subtle differences in emergency medicine could make or break a good group’s survival. – Jeremiah Johnson in Florida…




Traditional Womanly Arts for Austere Times by Sue of Suburbia

…This is an important skill to learn now, before a crisis situation occurs, as it takes much time to develop the confidence and knowledge to be able to apply it in a practical way.  I am by no means an expert in this vast field of ancient medicine and am constantly learning, but I find this area tremendously useful and fulfilling as a mother.  I recommend Encyclopedia of Herbal Medicine: The Definitive Home Reference Guide. Lastly and perhaps the most important of all womanly skills is teaching.  In order to preserve these womanly arts for future generations, it is of utmost importance for a woman to include her daughters, nieces and/or young friends in all of these activities such that they become a way-of-life from an early age.  I have no doubt that the future holds much more austerity than what we know now.  We humans are using resources too…




Letter From The Goat Lady Re: Free Survival Medicine Reference

Memsahib:   In your spare time (LOL) you might want to check out this book, downloadable free at http://www.aussurvivalist.com/downloads/AM%20Final%202.pdf or hard copy at http://www.cafepress.com/austeremed.23362365   Survival and Austere medicine would be a REALLY handy thing to have in a SHTF situation as it’s practical info, field tested, and doable by a non-medical person.  All the authors are in the medical field either as MDs, EMTs, RNs, etc.  They knoweth what they are doing and talking about.  Chapter 8 is really good on herbs, preps, uses, and the content is approved by the above listed medical personal.  I think Chapter 8 is really good for beginner or experienced herb users (I should think it’s great – I wrote it).    Anyway, try to find time to give it a peruse – it may be helpful to lots of your readers – the authors do not get any kickback or anything – this was…




TEOTWAWKI Medical Skills: Thoughts on Becoming a “Woofer” (Wilderness First Responder), by Richard B.

told in advance what to expect when they came on the scene. We had outdoor night-practice sessions. No matter their background or experience, everyone learned something new. Quoting from the curriculum documents, here is an overview of what we covered: Day One: Course Overview & Patient Assessment Introductions & Course Overview What is Remote Medicine? Role of the Medical Officer Communications/Telemedicine Medical-legal Considerations Primary Survey Physical Exam Vital Signs Patient History Documentation Day Two: CPR CPR for the Healthcare Provider Considerations for Remote Environments Oxygen Administration Day Three: Trauma Management Orthopedic Injuries Shock Neurological Trauma & Injury Day Four: Trauma Management Wound Management & Infection Chest Injuries Dental Emergencies Lifting & Moving Patients Patient Packaging & Transportation Day Five: Medical Emergencies Cardio-respiratory Emergencies Acute Abdominal Pain Metabolic Illness & Allergic Reactions Medication Administration Lab Day Six: Medical Continued/Environmental Genitourinary Medicine Neurological Illness Altitude Related Illnesses Psychological Emergencies & Rescuer Stress…




The Survivalist’s Odds ‘n Sods:

SurvivalBlog presents another edition of The Survivalist’s Odds ‘n Sods— a collection of news bits and pieces that are relevant to the modern survivalist and prepper, this week from JWR. Today we highlight the population density of the Great Basin region. Survival and Austere Medicine Book Update! A group of medical professionals has rewritten their great Survival and Austere Medicine freeware book. The Second Edition was published in 2005 as a free PDF and has been download more than 5,000 times and it is found in many on-line prepper/survivalist collections. They have just released the Third Edition. The new edition of the book remains free – it is a labor of love from a group of medically-orientated preppers and Survivalists – several MDs, nurses, Physician’s Assistants (PAs), a veterinarian, and a biomedical technician. Most of them live in Australia and New Zealand. The Third Edition (of December, 2017) is a…




The Survivalist’s Odds ‘n Sods:

…penchant for SWAT. HF Ops Reader P.S. sent in this excellent article that details some of the questions and answers a new person might have when considering High Frequency (HF) communications. Do you get a dedicated QRP rig or a full power rig for the field? What additional equipment do you need and what skills do you need to master in order to be effective in using the equipment are just some of the questions dealt with. And again, it encourages the reader to actually use it rather than just collect the equipment. Survival & Austere Medicine Reader G.L. pointed out that the Austrailina Preparedness Forum has posted the release of the third revision of Survival & Austere Medicine. The PDF download is free and this is an excellent resources for those looking to improve their back country medical skills. Of course, nothing can replace the ready access we have…




Sources for Free Survival and Preparedness Information on the Internet, by K.L. in Alaska

…web site.   Medical Resources The Disease Net has a library of downloadable manuals on survival, weapons, emergency medicine, and less serious subjects. Virtual Naval Hospital is a digital library of naval, military, and humanitarian medicine The very important field manual, First Aid For Soldiers FM 21-11 can be downloaded here. One of the best medical handbooks available is the U.S. Army Special Forces Medical Handbook ST31-91B. It can be downloaded free (as well as additional essential guides) from Delta Gear, Inc. A newer version of the Medical Handbook, plus more great material can be downloaded from NH-TEMS (New Hampshire Tactical Emergency medical support). The American Red Cross has some of their disaster guides online for download. For most of their material, you have to go to the local office. Some of it can be copied from the Earth Changes Media Survival Tips page.  The Red Cross Book, First Aid…




The Long View- Part 2, by J.M.

…self-reliance if SHTF. I had both of my daughters take this course for this very reason. I also completely agree with you about ‘Where There Is No Doctor’ and Where There Is No Dentist.’ I prepared an annotated list of references for those who must practice in ‘austere‘ conditions. (Austere medicine is how we will practice after SHTF). This list is available at: http://moljinar.com/page6/files/Austere%20Medicine%20Books%20v2.doc It does contain books that are ‘professional medical’ in content, but goes far beyond basic EMT training. I keep the entire list of books on a USB as references anytime I am deployed to a disaster. And, again, having responded to multiple disasters, I’d NOT recommend ‘acclimating’ yourself to local water. Filter, boil, and/or treat ALL of the water that goes in your mouth. (Tested well water would be an exception, of course.) Look at cholera in Haiti for a very easy example of why you…